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The Artistic Heritage of Modena: At the Origin of the Galleria Estense

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Gamepiece with a Dead Heron ("Falconer's Bag")

Jan Weenix (Dutch, Amsterdam ca. 1641?–1719 Amsterdam)

Date:
1695
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
52 3/4 x 43 3/4 in. (134 x 111.1 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Rogers Fund, 1950
Accession Number:
50.55
  • Gallery Label

    Jan Weenix was the son of the Italianate landscape and genre painter Jan Baptist Weenix (1621–1660/61) and the nephew of Melchior d’Hondecoeter (whose Peacocks hangs nearby). This "hunting trophy" was probably intended for a town house, but it evokes life on a huge estate in another European country. The ends of a hunting horn emerge from beneath the heron’s wings. Two falcon hoods are tucked into the flora and fauna on the right, and to the lower left is a bird whistle made from leather bellows and a lobster claw.

  • Catalogue Entry

    Forthcoming

  • Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

    Inscription: Signed and dated (upper right): Jan Weeninx Fecit Ao.1695

  • Provenance

    ?Baron Nathaniel Mayer Rothschild, Theresianumgasse, Vienna (until d. 1905); his nephew, Baron Alphonse Mayer Rothschild, Theresianumgasse, Vienna, later U.S.A. (by 1939–d. 1942 [seized by the Nazis; inv., 1939, no. 424, as Geflügelstilleben; held at Alt Aussee (2377) and at Munich collecting point (3639)]); his widow, Clarice, Baroness Rothschild, New York ([returned to Austria March 15, 1948; restituted] until 1950; sold to Rosenberg & Stiebel); [Rosenberg & Stiebel, New York, 1950; sold to MMA]

  • Exhibition History

    Buffalo. Albright Art Gallery. "Trends in Painting, 1600–1800," October 2–November 3, 1957, unnumbered cat.

    Athens. National Pinakothiki, Alexander Soutzos Museum. "Treasures from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: Memories and Revivals of the Classical Spirit," August 15–November 15, 1979, no. 50.

    Memphis. Brooks Memorial Art Gallery. "Seventeenth-Century Dutch Paintings from The Metropolitan Museum of Art," May 1–June 23, 1982, no catalogue?

    Columbus, Ohio. Columbus Museum of Art. "Seventeenth-Century Dutch Paintings from The Metropolitan Museum of Art," August 28–November 28, 1982, no catalogue?

    Hamilton, N.Y. Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University. "Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt from The Metropolitan Museum of Art," February 6–April 17, 1983, no. 11.

    Rochester, N.Y. Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester. "Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt from The Metropolitan Museum of Art," May 3–June 5, 1983, no. 11.

    Amarillo, Tex. Amarillo Art Center. "Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt from The Metropolitan Museum of Art," June 22–July 31, 1983, no. 11.

    Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. "Italian Recollections: Dutch Painters of the Golden Age," June 8–July 22, 1990, no. 70.

    New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art," September 18, 2007–January 6, 2008, no catalogue.

  • References

    Ingvar Bergström et al. Natura in posa: la grande stagione della natura morta europea. Milan, 1977, p. 219, ill.

    Scott A. Sullivan. "Rembrandt's 'Self Portrait with a Dead Bittern'." Art Bulletin 62 (June 1980), pp. 242–43, fig. 9, suggests that this kind of hunting piece is really a token of the hunt, rather than a depiction of the results of an actual hunt; notes that the diversity of fowl in the painting would have required different methods of capture.

    Stephanie Dickey et al. Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt from The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Exh. cat., Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University. Hamilton, N.Y., 1983, pp. 32–33, no. 11, ill., describes the arbitrary combination of motifs, making "the scene an emblem of wealth and leisure rather than a naturalistic still life".

    Peter C. Sutton. A Guide to Dutch Art in America. Grand Rapids, Mich., 1986, pp. 190.

    Gregor J. M. Weber. Stilleben alter Meister in der Kasseler Gemäldegalerie. [Kassel], 1989, p. 39, fig. 34a (color), cites the painting as an example of Weenix depicting a classical relief with Pan, Priapus, Silenus, or similar gods.

    Beverly Louise Brown. "Montreal, Dutch Italianate Painters." Burlington Magazine 132 (August 1990), p. 603, claims that the "overblown still life" reveals "how overpowering the urge to aggrandise was at the end of the century".

    Frederik J. Duparc and Linda L. Graif. Italian Recollections: Dutch Painters of the Golden Age. Exh. cat., Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Montreal, 1990, pp. 209–10, no. 70, ill. (color), note the ornate antique urn in the composition and suggest that it recalls his earlier southern scenes; observe the statues and other classical motifs that are prevalent in his works from the 1660s and characteristic of his work in general.

    Walter Liedtke. "Dutch Paintings in America: The Collectors and Their Ideals." Great Dutch Paintings from America. Exh. cat., Mauritshuis, The Hague. Zwolle, The Netherlands, 1990, p. 55, mentions it among the MMA's more significant purchases of Dutch art since World War II.

    Peter C. Sutton. Northern European Paintings in the Philadelphia Museum of Art: From the Sixteenth through the Nineteenth Century. Philadelphia, 1990, p. 359, fig. 131-2, notes the repetition of the relief on the jardiniere in a similar painting by Weenix, dated 1700, in the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

    Sophie Lillie. Was einmal war: Handbuch der enteigneten Kunstsammlungen Wiens. Vienna, 2003, p. 1018, no. 424, lists it in the 1939 inventory of art works owned by Alphonse Rothschild.

    Walter Liedtke. Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 2007, vol. 1, pp. xi, 144; vol. 2, pp. 939–41, no. 216, colorpl. 216.

    Esmée Quodbach. "The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 65 (Summer 2007), pp. 22, 50.



  • See also
437937

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