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Staff List

Imtikar Ally, Senior Department Technician, has worked at The Met since 1990. He joined the department in 2005.

Kurt Behrendt, Associate Curator of South Asian Art, has been at The Met since 2006. He has curated more than half a dozen exhibitions, including Buddhism along the Silk Road (2012) and Cosmic Buddhas in the Himalayas (2017), and has published widely on the Buddhist art of the Indian subcontinent. Before coming to The Met, he taught graduate and undergraduate courses at Temple University. Ongoing field research in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Tibet, Japan, and Southeast Asia provides a foundation for his exhibitions and publications. His 1997 PhD from UCLA focused on the Buddhist architecture of Gandhara.

Selected Publications:

Woman with auburn hair and turquoise scarf Monika Bincsik, Assistant Curator, specializes in Japanese decorative arts and textile. From 2008 to 2009 she was a Jane and Morgan Whitney Research Fellow at the Museum. Later she worked as a research assistant at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, where she earned a second PhD on Japanese lacquers. As an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Met from 2013 to 2015, she conducted research on lacquerware, textile, ceramics, and netsuke. She was co-curator of Kimono: A Modern History (2014) and curated Discovering Japanese Art: American Collectors and the Met (2015). She has published numerous articles on Japanese decorative arts and collecting history.

Selected Publications:

  • Bincsik, Monika. "Japanese Lacquer in Eighteenth-Century Europe: Status and Value—Market Price of Craftsmanship and the Canon of the Grand Arts." In East Asian Lacquer: Material Culture, Science and Conservation, edited by S. Rivers, R. Faulkner, and B. Pretzel, 28–39. London: Archetype, 2011.
  • ———. "Discovering Japanese Art: American Collectors and The Met." Orientations 46.2 (2015): 118–131.
  • ———. "An Appreciation of Nabeshima." Impressions 37 (2016): 35–51.
John T. Carpenter, Mary Griggs Burke Curator of Japanese Art, has been with The Met since 2011. From 1999 to 2011, he taught the history of Japanese art at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and served as head of the London office of the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures. He has published widely on Japanese art, especially in the areas of calligraphy, painting, and woodblock prints, and has helped organize numerous exhibitions at the Museum, including Designing Nature (2012–13); Birds in the Art of Japan (2013); Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan (2013–14); and Celebrating the Arts of Japan (2015–17).

Selected Publications:

  • Carpenter, John T., ed. Hokusai and His Age: Ukiyo-e Painting, Printmaking, and Book Illustration in Late Edo Japan. Leiden: Hotei, 2005.
  • ———, ed. Reading Surimono: The Interplay of Text and Image in Japanese Prints. Leiden: Hotei, 2008.
  • ———, ed. Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012.
Lori Carrier, Senior Technician, is responsible for the safe handling, storage, and installation of the department's artworks. She is also responsible for monitoring gallery and storage climate conditions, tracking artworks in The Museum System (TMS), and inventorying the department's extensive collection. She holds an MFA from the New York Academy of Art, and is a practicing artist in her spare time. She loves lists, long strings of numbers, and perfect spacing. Her favorite curatorial instruction is "make it beautiful."

Alison Clark, Collections Management Specialist, joined the department in 2006. She coordinates object photography, some exhibitions and loans, and department website content. Alison also works with The Met's databases, monitors gallery/storage climate, and conducts provenance research. She participates in the Museum's Collection Care Group and Time-Based Media Working Group. An alumna of Beloit College, she holds an MA in medieval history from Fordham University and a graduate certificate in museum studies from New York University. Her previous experience includes the Merchant's House Museum, the New York Public Library, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.
John Guy, Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art, served as senior curator of Indian art at the Victoria and Albert Museum for 22 years and is an elected fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. He also served as an advisor to UNESCO on historical sites in Asia and has worked on a number of archaeological excavations. Since coming to the Met in 2008, he has curated and co-curated numerous exhibitions, most recently Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century (2014), Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 (2013), and Cambodian Rattan: The Sculptures of Sopheap Pich (2013).

Selected Publications:

  • Guy, John. Indian Art and Connoisseurship: Essays in Honour of Douglas Barrett. New Delhi: Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts; Mapin Publishing, 1995.
  • ———. Woven Cargoes: Indian Textiles in the East. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998.
  • MetPublications: Selected Publications by John Guy
Man wearing a grey suit and standing in a garden Maxwell K. (Mike) Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman, joined The Met in 1971 to help oversee the expansion of the Chinese art collection and the addition of new exhibition spaces. Since 2011 he has served as department chair. Mike has curated more than 50 exhibitions, authored or contributed to numerous catalogues, and taught graduate and undergraduate seminars on Chinese painting at Yale, Princeton, Columbia, and the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. He earned his BA from Yale University and his PhD from Princeton University, and was elected fellow at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

Selected Publications:

Yuan-li Hou, Douglas Dillon Conservator of Chinese Paintings, joined the department in 2003. A leader in The Met's Asian Art Conservation Studio, she is responsible for restoring and remounting fragile or damaged works and training students in traditional remounting techniques. Yuan-li has 41 years of experience as a conservator. She trained and worked at The Palace Museum (1975–85) and, after immigrating to the United States in 1986, she worked as a restoration consultant for both private collectors and cultural institutions. She was a conservation specialist at the Freer and Sackler Galleries from 1998 to 2000.
Woman with long auburn hair, glasses, and a white shirt Jessica Kuhn, Collections Management Assistant, joined the department in the winter of 2014. She assists with exhibitions, photographing works in the collection, provenance research, and helping maintain the collections management database. Previously, she worked in the registration department of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco. She has a BFA in photography and an MA in arts administration from the Fashion Institute of Technology.
Soyoung Lee, Curator, joined the Museum in 2003. A specialist in the ceramics of Korea and Japan, she is primarily responsible for The Met's Korean art collection, programs, and galleries. She has organized major international loan exhibitions with accompanying catalogues, including Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom (2013) with Denise Patry Leidy, and Art of the Korean Renaissance, 1400–1600 (2009), as well as shows focusing on the permanent collection, such as Korea: 100 Years of Collecting at the Met (2015). She earned a PhD from Columbia University with a dissertation on the relationship between Korean and Japanese ceramics from the 15th through 19th century.

Selected Publications:

Woman with dark hair wearing a lavender shirt and dark blazer. Shi-yee Liu, Assistant Research Curator of Chinese Art, received her PhD from Yale University in 2003. She wrote her dissertation on the artist Chen Hongshou (1599–1652) and has published on the artist consistently since then. Focusing on traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy, she has authored an exhibition catalogue and a wide range of English and Chinese articles that examine artworks from an interdisciplinary angle. Curator of the exhibition Show and Tell: Stories in Chinese Painting (2016–17), she also participates in other exhibition projects and publishes the documentation of Chinese paintings and calligraphies on the Museum's website.

Selected Publications:

Pengliang Lu, Henry A. Kissinger Curatorial Fellow, joined the Museum in 2013 to assist in the organization of and research for the 2017 exhibition Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties, 221 B.C.–A.D. 220. From 2002 to 2008, he worked at the Shanghai Museum. Pengliang works with Chinese decorative arts and has published several articles on metal works, ceramics, textiles, and literati objects. He is also a PhD candidate at the Bard Graduate Center, conducting research on Chinese bronzes and antiquarianism of the 13th and 14th centuries.

Selected Publications:

  • Lu, Pengliang. "Xuanlu Bianyi (On Xuande Bronze Incense Burners)." Wenwu 7 (2008): 64–92.
  • ———. "Beyond the Women's Quarters: Meaning and Function of Cloisonné in the Ming and Qing Dynasties." In Cloisonné: Chinese Enamels from the Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties, edited by Béatrice Quette, 63–79. New York: Bard Graduate Center, 2011.
  • ———. "The Ingenuity of Qin-Han Craftsmanship." In Age of Empires: Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties, edited by Jason Sun, 39–49. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017.
Tegan Miller, Associate for Administration, joined the department in 2015. She is the assistant to Douglas Dillon Chairman Maxwell K. Hearn, and manages the Friends of Asian Art program. She is also responsible for organizing the biannual Visiting Committee meetings and assists with general administrative support for curators, exhibitions, and events. Tegan received her BA in English from Temple University and her MA in English education from New York University.
Jennifer Perry, Mary and James Wallach Family Conservator of Japanese Art, joined the department in 2010. Jennifer is responsible for the care and conservation of Japanese paintings and Tibetan and Nepalese thangkas. From 2004 to 2010, she was associate conservator at the Cleveland Museum of Art, where she established a program for the conservation of East Asian paintings. From 1997 to 2004, she worked as a Japanese painting conservator at Oka Bokkodo, Co. Ltd., a studio in Kyoto, Japan. A graduate of Williams College, Jennifer received her MA in art history and a certificate in conservation from the New York University Institute of Fine Arts.

Selected Publications:

  • Oka, Yasuhiro, and Jennifer Perry. "The Use of Digital Imaging in the Mass Repair of Japanese Historical Documents and Sutras: An Alternative to Direct Leaf Casting." Studies in Conservation 47, no. 3 (2002): 149–153.
  • Belard, R., H. Higuchi, and J. Perry. "Furunori (Aged Wheat Starch Paste): Challenges of Production in Non-traditional Settings." Journal of the Institute of Conservation 32, no. 1 (2009): 35–57.
  • Leona, Marco, P. Londero, J. Perry, K. Fukunaga, G. Bailey, and C. Hale. "Designing Nature: Ogata Kōrin's Technical Choices in Irises at Yatsuhashi." In Science and Art: The Painted Surface, edited by Antonio Brunetto, Giovanni Brunetti, Costanza Miliani, 335–52. London: The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014.
Beatrice Pinto, Supervising Departmental Technician, was hired as a security officer at The Met in June 1997. In October 1998, she was promoted to assistant maintainer for the department of lighting and design; she joined the Department of Asian Art as a technician in May 1999. Beatrice received a promotion to senior technician in 2001 and to supervising technician in 2005. As one of a team of four, she is responsible for the handling, installation, and de-installation of all works of art in the department's galleries, as well as for gallery rotations and exhibitions.
Woman with long dark hair wearing a necklace and sleeveless dress Kalyani Madhura Ramachandran, Research Assistant, studies the permanent collection of South Asian Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain art and provides organizational support for a range of curatorial activities, including exhibition installations and rotations, object acquisitions, and Museum publications; she also contributes to the website and conducts gallery talks. Kalyani was previously the department's Solow Graduate Intern in Indian and Southeast Asian Art. She received an MPhil in anthropology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar in 2015, and a BA in history from the University of Delhi in 2012.
Man with dark hair and glasses wearing a black suit with a white shirt and grey tie.
Joseph Scheier-Dolberg, Assistant Curator of Chinese Painting and Calligraphy, has been working at The Met since January 2013. He has curated the exhibitions The Art of the Chinese Album (2014) and Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy—Selections from the Collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang (2014). Joseph has published on a wide range of subjects, including the Qing imperial art collection, contemporary ink painting, the history of Chinese albums, and the appreciation of rocks in premodern China.

Selected Publications:

  • Scheier-Dolberg, Joseph. "Qianlong in Our Eyes: A Case of Evolving Taste at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston." In The Last Emperor's Collection: Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy from the Liaoning Provincial Museum, edited by Willow Weilan Hai Chang, Yang Renkai, and David Ake Sensabaugh. New York: China Institute, 2008.
  • — — —. "Turning the Page: The Art of the Chinese Album." Orientations Magazine 46.2 (March 2016): 157–163.
  • — — —. "The Story of the Stones: A Record of Obsession in Four Vignettes." In Museum of Stones: Ancient and Contemporary Art at the Noguchi Museum, edited by Dakin Hart, 26–35. New York and London: The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum in association with Giles, 2016.
Man with dark hair and glasses wearing a houndstooth jacket and a purple tie with distinctive motifs. Zhixin Jason Sun, Brooke Russell Astor Curator of Chinese Art, received his PhD in Chinese art and archaeology from Princeton University. He has curated exhibitions on various subjects, including Excellence and Elegance: Decorative Art of the Eighteenth Century Qing Court (2007); Small Delights: Chinese Snuff Bottles (2012); Colors of the Universe: Chinese Hardstone Carvings (2012-15); A Passion for Jade: The Heber Bishop Collection (2016); and the 2017 landmark exhibition Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Dynasties (221 B.C.–A.D. 220). He has lectured and published widely in his area of expertise, including on Chinese jade carving, metalwork, calligraphy, and archaeology.

Woman with long dark hair, glasses, and a black shirt Jacqueline Taeschler, Senior Collections Management Assistant, has been working at The Met since 1975. For 25 years, she worked in the reproduction studio, reproducing objects from the Museum's sculpture collection for merchandising in The Met Store. After the studio closed, she came to work in the Department of Asian Art, where she maintains the collection database and prepares paperwork for acquisitions, departmental loans, and special exhibitions. She received her BFA from The Cooper Union.

Stephanie Wada, Research Associate, received her BA in history at Vassar College and did her graduate studies in art history at Columbia University. She has taught Japanese and Asian art courses at Temple University's Tyler School of Art, The New School, CUNY, and as a preceptor at Columbia University. From 1986 through 2015, Stephanie was associate curator at the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation and the Mary Griggs Burke Collection; in 2000 she was a contributing author to Bridge of Dreams, the catalogue that accompanied the exhibition Masterpieces of Japanese Art from the Mary Griggs Burke Collection at The Met.

Selected Publications:

  • Wada, Stephanie. Selected catalogue entries in Jewel Rivers: Japanese Art from the Burke Collection, edited by Miyeko Murase, with Gratia Williams Nakahashi and Stephanie Wada. Richmond: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1994.
  • Wada, Stephanie. The Oxherder: A Zen Parable Illustrated. New York: George Braziller, 2002.
  • Sadao, Tsuneko S., and Stephanie Wada. Discovering the Arts of Japan: A Historical Overview. New York: Abbeville Press, 2010.
Woman with short dark hair, glasses, and a lavender-and-pink silk scarf Kewei Wang, Starr Conservator of Chinese Painting, joined The Met in 2013. She restores fragile or damaged works, and trains students in traditional techniques of remounting. Kewei has 40 years of experience in the conservation of Chinese painting. She trained and worked at The Palace Museum (1976–1989). Later, she served as conservator of Asian and Western artworks on paper at The Hai Yan Institute for Conservation of Works of Art in Germany (1989–93) and senior conservator of Asian painting at the University of Michigan Museum of Art (1996–2013), where she conserved Asian paintings from the university museum as well as from other American museums.

Jill Wickenheisser, Administrator, joined the Museum in 2011 as an associate administrator and was appointed administrator in 2015. Jill currently supervises all aspects of the administrative staff and oversees the department's exhibitions, rotations, and capital projects. Jill is also responsible for departmental fiscal activities, including the operational budget, donor funds, personnel issues, and gallery maintenance. She received her BA in art history from Rutgers University in 2008 and her MA in arts and cultural management from Pratt Institute in 2015.
Man with salt-and-pepper hair and a white shirt Masanobu Yamazaki, Conservator, is responsible for the Museum's Japanese paintings collection. Before coming to The Met, he spent 15 years as a conservator of Japanese paintings for Oka Bokkodo Co. Ltd., one of the premier conservation studios in Japan. He has also worked on special projects for The British Museum and The Museo Nacional de Soares dos Reis in Porto, Portugal. As an affiliate with the Association for the Conservation of National Treasures in Japan, he has worked on national treasures and important cultural properties for institutions throughout Japan.
Woman with short black hair and a black blouse Hwai-ling Yeh-Lewis, Senior Collections Manager, oversees the storage and care of over 35,000 works in the Asian Art collection. This includes all administration procedures related to acquisitions, incoming and outgoing loans, the collection database, exhibitions, and collection inventory. She also manages internal and external requests for access to the collections, and works with the collections team to facilitate gallery installations and implement the highest standards for collection care. She received her MS in education from Indiana University.