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Posts Tagged "concerts"

Of Note

Emanuel Winternitz and the Museum's Member Concerts

Rebecca Lindsey, Visiting Committee Member, Department of Musical Instruments and Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Monday, July 27, 2015

Beginning in the early 1940s, the Met became home to a remarkable series of free concerts performed on many of the finest instruments in the Museum's collection. The concerts came about thanks to the efforts of the first curator of the Department of Musical Instruments, Emanuel Winternitz, who believed that the instrument collection needed to be heard as well as seen in order to be fully appreciated. While the use of musical instruments has always been an important part of understanding and interpreting them as art objects at the Metropolitan Museum, the philosophy of the time was much more liberal than today's conservation-minded approach. The concerts began in early 1943 and continued for more than a decade until the creation of a Department of Auditorium Events (later Concerts and Lectures), which gradually replaced the Winternitz-era scholarly programming with more mainstream attractions for which it could charge admission.

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Of Note

The Sax Family: Three Generations of Genius

Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, November 17, 2014

In honor of the bicentenary of the birth of instrument maker Adolphe Sax, the Department of Musical Instruments has opened Celebrating Sax: Instruments and Innovation in gallery 682 of The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments. This new exhibition features some astounding instruments by the maker and his family, and traces the influence he had on other builders of musical instruments.

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Of Note

Celebrating Sax: Instruments and Innovation

Bradley Strauchen-Scherer, Associate Curator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, November 3, 2014

November 6 marks the two-hundredth birthday of Adolphe Sax (1814–1894), and the Met will be celebrating the occasion with a special exhibition, Celebrating Sax: Instruments and Innovation, which features instruments made by three generations of the Sax family. Rare saxophones, brass instruments, and even an exquisite ivory clarinet are among the twenty-six instruments selected to showcase the inventions and innovations of this extraordinary family. The exhibition opens with a free concert by internationally acclaimed saxophone soloist Paul Cohen at 2:30 pm this Wednesday, November 5, in The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments.

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Of Note

David Mannes and the Great Hall Concerts

Rebecca Lindsey, Visiting Committee Member, Department of Musical Instruments and Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Tuesday, April 22, 2014

David Mannes (1866–1969) was a violinist, famed conductor, and one of the most important music educators in the United States, best known for the Manhattan music school he founded in 1916 which today is Mannes College The New School of Music. Though never a Museum employee, Mannes began the distinguished history of musical performances at the Met. He conducted at the Museum for more than forty years, and for thirty years led regular free concerts that The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin described in 1949 as having "America's largest indoor audiences." Particularly during the 1930s, when the Museum had no curator knowledgeable about instruments, Mannes also advised on the acquisition of instruments and their care.

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About this Blog

The Museum's collection of musical instruments includes approximately five thousand examples from six continents and the Pacific Islands, dating from about 300 B.C. to the present. It illustrates the development of musical instruments from all cultures and eras. On this blog, curators and guests will share information about this extraordinary collection, its storied history, the department's public activities, and some of the audio and video recordings from our archives.