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Now at the Met

Reflecting on Alarm Will Sound's Residency

Alan Pierson, Artistic Director, Alarm Will Sound

Posted: Friday, June 27, 2014

There's a corner you turn in the Egyptian Wing of the Metropolitan Museum where the labyrinth of galleries suddenly opens up into a staggering vista of The Temple of Dendur. Though I now always know what I'm about to see, turning that corner is still a powerful experience. Walking into Alarm Will Sound's first rehearsal for I Was Here I Was I at the Temple, I was struck by what an incredible thing it is to be creating art at the Met. We created I Was Here I Was I expressly for The Temple of Dendur, using it not only as venue, but as subject.

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Installation in Progress—Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #370

Eileen Willis, Web Group General Manager

Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Join us in Gallery 399 for a special chance to see the installation of Sol LeWitt's 1982 Wall Drawing #370 in progress. The exhibition officially opens on June 30.

Above: Time-lapse photography of installers preparing Sol LeWitt's Wall Drawing #370.

The loan of Wall Drawing #370 is courtesy of The Estate of Sol LeWitt. The installation is made possible by The Modern Circle. Director/Producer: Kate Farrell; Time-Lapse Photography: Thomas Ling; Production Assistants: Caiti Borruso, Emily Chang

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The Dyes Have It: Exploring Color and Tapestries

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Many #tapestrytuesday readers have asked why some tapestries in the Met's collection have such diverse color palettes. As it turns out, the question you should be asking isn't "Why?" but "Dye?" Understanding the preservation or degradation of a tapestry's color is a complex sort of query whose answer is largely influenced by the dyes used to color its threads. To help unravel the mystery of tapestry colors, I recently sat down for a fascinating lesson in dyeing with two of the Museum's tapestry experts: Cristina Carr, conservator in the Department of Textile Conservation; and Nobuko Shibayama, associate research scientist in the Department of Scientific Research.

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Charles James: Beyond Fashion—Interview with Conservators Sarah Scaturro and Glenn Petersen

Rachel High, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Sarah Scaturro and Glenn Petersen are conservators in The Costume Institute who not only contributed to the conservation of Charles James's works in Charles James: Beyond Fashion, on view through August 10, but also authored an essay for the catalogue which accompanies the exhibition. The book offers a comprehensive study of the life and work of legendary Anglo-American couturier Charles James (1906−1978) and highlights his virtuosity and inventiveness. This publication also includes early photographs and rarely seen archival items, such as muslin study pieces, dress forms, and sketches.

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A Happy Occasion for Melencolia I

Nadine Orenstein, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Monday, June 16, 2014

The year 2014 marks the five-hundredth anniversary of Albrecht Dürer's Melencolia I (1514), a masterpiece of engraving whose imagery has fascinated artists, historians, scientists, and mathematicians for centuries. In honor of this occasion, a small display of Melencolia and several works it influenced is on view through July 14 in the Robert Wood Johnson Jr. Gallery.

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I Was Here I Was I to Channel The Temple of Dendur's History

Meryl Cates, Press Officer, Met Museum Presents

Posted: Friday, June 13, 2014

When Kate Soper's adventurous score for I Was Here I Was I fills The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing on June 20, the gallery itself will be at the center of the performance. The Temple of Dendur has long been an unrivaled venue for concerts, but for this dramatic and unprecedented finale to Alarm Will Sound's yearlong residency, the Temple will be the principal character in a story that spans two millennia and three different storylines.

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Celebrating the World Cup through the Met's Collection

Christopher Gorman, Assistant for Administration, Audience Development

Posted: Thursday, June 12, 2014

Today marks the opening day of the World Cup, the monthlong tournament in which teams from thirty-two nations will compete for the title of best soccer team in the world. Since the Metropolitan's collection includes works of art from all thirty-two nations participating in the games, we thought this would be a perfect occasion to celebrate the global nature of our holdings.

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Metropolitan Museum Singled Out for Curatorial Achievement in Time-Based Media

Pari Stave, Senior Administrator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art

Posted: Thursday, June 12, 2014

The Metropolitan Museum recently swept the AICA-USA Arts Awards for Excellence in Curatorial Achievement in the time-based media category.​

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A New Web Feature: One Met. Many Worlds.

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2014

The art at the Met reaches across the globe, so we wanted to start providing our collection information in some of the many languages represented by these cultures. Our new web feature One Met. Many Worlds. brings you more than five hundred collection highlights in eleven languages: English, Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

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Solace and Silence: The Music of Arvo Pärt

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media Department

Posted: Friday, May 30, 2014

"Feel the World Stand Still"

This phrase is currently emblazoned on subway ads across New York City promoting the Arvo Pärt Project at St. Vladimir's Seminary, which will bring the Estonian composer to New York for the first time since 1984. While this kind of dramatic hyperbole often surrounds any discourse regarding Pärt's music—"mystical," "heavenly," "timeless" are frequently used—the overwhelming acceptance of his work is a rare occurrence in the landscape of contemporary concert performance. His is a music that seamlessly bridges the gap between the modern and the ancient, minimalism and Gregorian chant, making the comparisons often cited between Pärt's music and that of both Phillip Glass and Josquin dez Prez the equivalent of an artist being equally heralded alongside Rothko and Caravaggio.

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About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.