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Now at the Met

Celestial Steeds: A Celebration of the Year of the Horse

Zhixin Jason Sun, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014

To celebrate the Year of the Horse, the Metropolitan Museum is presenting a selection of exceptional works in Gallery 207 for a limited period.

Since its domestication in prehistoric times, the horse has played an essential role in Chinese life. During the Shang and Zhou dynasties (ca. 1600–256 B.C.) horse-drawn chariots were a sign of high social status and the premier weapon of war. By the fourth century B.C., increasing encounters with nomadic horsemen led to the adoption of mounted cavalry as a dominant force in the battles between rival states that culminated with the unification of the country and establishment of the first Chinese empire—the Qin dynasty (221–206 B.C.).

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Highlights of Gridiron Greats: Vintage Football Cards in the Collection of Jefferson R. Burdick

Freyda Spira, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Thursday, January 23, 2014

On the occasion of the 2014 Super Bowl—the first ever played in the New York area—the Metropolitan Museum is displaying a selection of vintage football cards from its celebrated Jefferson R. Burdick Collection of printed ephemera. The exhibition Gridiron Greats: Vintage Football Cards in the Collection of Jefferson R. Burdick, on view through February 10, features some 150 football cards printed between 1894 and 1959.

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Now at the Met

Small Delights: Chinese Snuff Bottles

Zhixin Jason Sun, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Tuesday, January 14, 2014

The current exhibition Small Delights: Chinese Snuff Bottles (on view through June 15, 2014) is drawn entirely from the Museum's extensive collection, and features many works that haven't been shown in decades. These exquisite miniatures not only illustrate the extraordinary technical virtuosity and refined aesthetic sensibility achieved by Qing craftsmen, but also provide a window on life and culture in late imperial China.

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Now at the Met

Featured Catalogue: The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925

Nadja Hansen, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Tuesday, January 7, 2014

To coincide with the opening of the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925, Thayer Tolles—the Met's Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture in The American Wing—has coauthored an evocative catalogue that explores the themes of the Old West as brought to life in enduringly popular sculptures. The publication includes new photography, essays that consider the complex role artists played in constructing the public perception of the West, and an illustrated chronology of historical and artistic events.

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Introducing #tapestrytuesday

Sarah Mallory, Research Assistant, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A riddle, if you will: What type of artwork did Henry VIII love so much that he owned at least 2,500 examples, and Louis XIV and the Medici family value so immensely that they each established their own production workshops?

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A Three Kings Day Reunion

C. Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Monday, January 6, 2014

Today, January 6, marks the Feast of the Epiphany, also known as Three Kings Day. This festival is widely celebrated, especially in western Christianity, as the day that the three wise men offered frankincense, myrrh, and gold to the Christ Child following their long journey from the East. This year, Three Kings Day is especially auspicious for the Museum's collection because today we celebrate the exceptional reunification of the sculptures pictured above.

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Peacocks and Dragons, Oh My!

Denise Patry Leidy, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, January 3, 2014

The lush green hue of this Chinese court robe was created using peacock feathers, which were twisted onto silk threads before weaving the garment. The use of such peacock-feather threads is thought to have begun in China in the fifth century. However, the first preserved examples date to the early seventeenth century, and costumes woven with peacock feathers are extremely rare. This robe, which has not been displayed for more than fifty years, is now on view in Power and Prestige: Chinese Dragon Robes, 18th–21st Century.

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Precious Punctuation?

Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art; and Denise Patry Leidy, Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, December 27, 2013

Dragons? Cashews? Crescent moons? What are those comma-shaped ornaments seen in the exhibition Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom?

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Installing Ink Art

Mike Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art

Posted: Thursday, December 26, 2013

What does it take to install an exhibition of contemporary Chinese art?

The diversity in scale, media, and format of the seventy-some pieces in Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China have tested the talents and ingenuity of the Museum's incredibly resourceful staff. After a number of advance planning meetings, our installation began in earnest on October 30 in the Early Chinese Buddhist Sculpture Gallery (206)—just off the Great Hall Balcony. There, we planned to display three 16 1/2-foot-tall hanging scrolls from Qiu Zhijie's 30 Letters to Qiu Jiawa, (2009) and the five triptychs of Yang Jiechang's Crying Landscapes (2002). Together, these works would announce to visitors to the Asian Wing that they were entering the world of contemporary China, where old and new often come together.

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Balthus: Cats and Girls—Interview with Curator Sabine Rewald

Nadja Hansen, Editorial Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Monday, December 23, 2013

With less than a month left to see the exhibition Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, I sat down with Sabine Rewald—Jacques and Natasha Gelman Curator in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art,  and author of the accompanying exhibition catalogue—to discuss her many years of fascination with Balthus, as well as her latest research that has brought such a renewed richness to the artist's subjects.

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Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.