Quantcast

The Metropolitan Museum of Art LogoEmail

Type the CAPTCHA word:

Now at the Met

Ready for a Close-Up: Fernand Khnopff's Hortensia

Alison Hokanson, Assistant Curator, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Monday, September 28, 2015

How does an artist go about composing a view? In the nineteenth century, convention dictated that scenes of everyday life should have a well-defined sense of space and a clear focal point, with figures—the "human interest" aspect of a picture—front and center. However, one of our new acquisitions, Hortensia, by the Belgian artist Fernand Khnopff, tackles the question of composition from a whole new angle.

Read More

Now at the Met

Celebrating the Jefferson R. Burdick Collection

Freyda Spira, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Thursday, September 24, 2015

Today marks the launch of the new section of the Museum's website dedicated to the vast, diverse, and often surprising ephemera collection of Jefferson R. Burdick (1900–1963). The trade and postcards, which make up the bulk of the collection of over three hundred thousand objects, span in time from the 1890s to the last months of Burdick's life. An avid collector, Burdick dedicated his life to amassing, organizing, and cataloguing his collection. In addition to the acclaimed collection of over thirty thousand baseball cards—the most in a public collection outside of the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York—Burdick's collection includes a dizzying array of trade cards that were produced by tobacco, candy, and gum companies, as well as bakeries, clothing shops, and milliners, to name just a few types of the American businesses that adopted the form as a means of advertising their products.

Read More

Now at the Met

Great Traditions—Kongo: Power and Majesty with Alisa LaGamma

Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Monday, September 21, 2015

Leaders of the Kingdom of Kongo, a region that today spans the Republic of the Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Angola forged connections with their European counterparts as early as the fifteenth century. While that relationship with the West began as one of equals, soon after the discovery of the Americas, this region of Central Africa became the epicenter of the Atlantic slave trade. This, followed by European colonization in the nineteenth century and the exploitation of the area's immense natural resources, created great instability and subjected Kongo peoples to devastating hardships. The over 170 works created by Kongo artists and presented in this new publication express the majesty of this society in the face of unparalleled challenges and enormous upheaval. Kongo: Power and Majesty accompanies the eponymous exhibition, on view through January 3, 2016.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Body Hidden, the Body Revealed: Neoclassical Drapery Studies

Perrin Stein, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Monday, September 21, 2015

In the late eighteenth century, when the advent of Neoclassicism had many painters turning to subjects inspired by ancient Rome, the ability to render drapery on the human figure became an essential skill, as seen in a group of drapery studies on view in the Robert Wood Johnson, Jr. Gallery through September 28. Just as it had in antiquity, both the challenge and the appeal of the subject lay in the way the drapery both covered and revealed the human form.

Read More

Now at the Met

Celebrating the Living Traditions of the Islamic World: Meet Artist in Residence Peter Hristoff

Jackie Terrassa, Managing Museum Educator for Gallery and Studio Programs, Education

Posted: Friday, September 18, 2015

Last winter, the Education Department and the Department of Islamic Art began to research and plan an extended fifteen-month residency with visual artist Peter Hristoff. Over this time Peter has worked with staff in both departments to co-plan programs that engage a wide variety of Met visitors—from those interested in hearing an artist's views on works in the collection to events that invite participants to create art themselves. Born in Istanbul to a family of Bulgarian artists and strongly influenced by Turkish art, Hristoff is now drawing from his own research of the Met's collection to develop a variety of programs that will connect many different audiences with works of art across the Museum, including those to be featured in the upcoming exhibition The Great Age of the Seljuqs, opening in April 2016.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Artist Project: Season 3

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Thursday, September 17, 2015

At the Season 2 launch of The Artist Project, I was struck by how many artists came up to me and said how much they loved being a part of this initiative. They enjoyed our academic attitude toward their work, an approach that seemed removed from the more glossy side of the contemporary art world. They are right. We address the work of living artists with the same rigor as an ancient tablet, a Chippendale table, or a Rembrandt. We equally enjoy the artists' approach to our work—their surprising choices and thoughtful discussion of what they see and feel from our collection.

Thomas Struth on Chinese Buddhist sculpture, Vik Muniz on our American art storage, Ann Hamilton on a Bamana marionette: each artist in Season 3 delights us with their exploration of the unexpected. Watch them all and discover a different Met through their extraordinary eyes.

Read More

Now at the Met

Porcelain Obsession: Denise Patry Leidy on Her New Book, How to Read Chinese Ceramics

Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Friday, September 11, 2015

A new publication in the highly popular How to Read series, How to Read Chinese Ceramics, by Denise Patry Leidy, Brooke Russell Astor Curator of Chinese Art and an expert in the field, is perfect for students who want to learn more about this fascinating, centuries-old tradition and is just in time for the start of the school year. This book introduces readers to the principal types of Chinese ceramics and covers the progression and development of the medium, using examples from the Met's comprehensive collection.

Read More

Now at the Met

Decorous and Deadly: Weapons of the Royal Hunt in India

Rachel Parikh, Mellon Curatorial Fellow, Department of Arms and Armor

Posted: Thursday, September 10, 2015

The Royal Hunt: Courtly Pursuits in Indian Art, on view through December 8, brings together vibrant Mughal and Rajasthani paintings that depict royalty, nobility, and courtiers engaged in the dynamic yet dangerous sport of hunting. In addition to artworks from the Departments of Asian Art and Islamic Art, a group of weapons and hunting accessories loaned by the Department of Arms and Armor are also on display, which provide not only a greater understanding of the royal hunt, but also a rare opportunity to see these objects in person.

Read More

Now at the Met

MuSe-ing at the Met: A Summer of Learning and Collaboration

Miriam Gold, Former Undergraduate Intern, Education Department

Posted: Wednesday, September 9, 2015

So what is it really like behind the scenes of one of the world's largest art museums?

For three weeks in July, I observed some of the daily routines of the summer MuSe interns here at the Met: forty-one college and graduate students hungry to gain insight into what it's really like to work at an encyclopedic art museum. Each intern is assigned a specific project and supervisor within one of the Met's departments, where he or she carries out the majority of their work. From curatorial and conservation departments to Digital Media and Information Systems & Technology, I was fortunate to be set free in the Met to explore these diverse areas of the Museum and interview the interns (while also being spoiled on a daily basis by an abundance of artistic jewels).

Read More

Now at the Met

Unearthing Gold Masterpieces from Venado Beach, Panama

James Doyle, Assistant Curator, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Posted: Friday, August 28, 2015

In 1948, the United States Navy discovered a rich Precolumbian cemetery with a bulldozer in the target shooting area of Fort Kobbe, a former military installation within the Canal Zone of Panama. In early 1951, after "a great deal of unrecorded digging by soldiers," Samuel Lothrop of the Peabody Museum of Harvard University arrived and conducted systematic excavations of over two hundred burials (fig. 2). After the Harvard project ended, "weekend" archaeologists such as Neville and Eva Harte continued work at Venado Beach and dug over 150 cist-like graves. Another such couple was Lt. Col. and Mrs. Lee E. Montgomery, who excavated in August of 1951, documenting nineteen graves, some of which contained multiple individuals.

Read More

Now at the Met

Existentialism and Abstraction: Etchings by Lucian Freud and Brice Marden

Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Currently on view in the Robert Wood Johnson, Jr. Gallery are works on paper by Lucian Freud and Brice Marden. Although these artists are widely acclaimed for their work in other media, prints play a critical role in their oeuvres. Both artists avidly explored possibilities for printmaking, often developing ideas and innovations that they then applied to work in other media. Their engagement with printmaking—etching in particular—was not only important for the artists, but also had a significant impact on the medium itself by offering up new possibilities.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Florentine Masterpiece Brought Back to Life

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015

What do you do when you have a Renaissance masterpiece in a truly cheap, junky, modern frame? You travel to Florence and have a handcrafted copy made of an original one.

Read More

Now at the Met

All American: Summer of Sargent and Bingham

Nora Gorman, College Group at the Met Committee Member

Posted: Monday, August 17, 2015

On Friday, July 31, the College Group at the Met (CGM) invited local college and graduate students to view The American Wing's summer exhibitions and permanent collection during the event All American: Summer of Sargent and Bingham. The evening's programs highlighted Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends and Navigating the West: George Caleb Bingham and the River, and uncovered exciting connections between the two exhibitions.

Read More

Now at the Met

Caillebotte's Chrysanthemums; or, Unexpected Encounters with Impressionist Interior Design

Jane R. Becker, Collections Management Assistant, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Gustave Caillebotte's Chrysanthemums in the Garden at Petit-Gennevilliers is one of the most exciting recent acquisitions in the Department of European Paintings. Now on view in gallery 824, not only is the painting the Met's first work by the artist, but it encapsulates a fresh approach to still life unseen before its time.

Read More

Now at the Met

Grace Under Pressure: Hungarian Goldsmiths and Their Guilds

Melissa Chumsky, Research Assistant, Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Posted: Monday, August 10, 2015

Munich, June 21, 1868: The premiere of Richard Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg—an opera portraying the well-known and respected guild of the Meistersingers, who entertained German audiences with poetry and song from the fourteenth through the sixteenth century. While it wouldn't be a proper opera without some romance and intrigue thrown in for good measure, it was the complex Renaissance guild system that provided such rich fodder for one of Wagner's only original plotlines. The story highlights an essential tension within the guilds, between artistic spontaneity and strict regulation, and illustrates how this tension was transcended to create incredible art.

Read More

Now at the Met

How Was It Made? The Process of Creating Art

Adrienne Spinozzi, Research Associate, The American Wing; and Medill Higgins Harvey, Assistant Curator of American Decorative Arts, The American Wing

Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Have you ever viewed an artwork and wondered how it was made? The Met's collection is full of art that inspires us to ponder its creation, but the Museum rarely reveals the many steps that were taken to create the final work of art.

Read More

Now at the Met

Why Vestments? An Introduction to Liturgical Textiles of the Post-Byzantine World

Warren T. Woodfin, Kallinikeion Assistant Professor of Art History, Queens College, City University of New York

Posted: Monday, August 3, 2015

The exhibition Liturgical Textiles of the Post-Byzantine World, now on view through November 1, 2015, presents a selection of notable liturgical vestments that communicate the continuing prestige of the Orthodox Church and its clergy in the centuries following the fifteenth-century fall of Byzantine Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. From a strictly theological viewpoint, vestments are hardly a necessity for Christian worship. Liturgical scholars are largely in agreement that for the first several centuries of Christianity's existence, its clergy officiated at services wearing the normal "street dress" of the Roman world. Only gradually did these items of clothing take on special significance as liturgical vestments, to be worn only during worship.

Read More

Now at the Met

Erté Is in Town! Designs for Delman's Shoes Now on View

Femke Speelberg, Associate Curator in Ornament and Architectural Prints, Drawings, and Modelbooks, Department of Drawings and Prints

Posted: Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Almost until the day of his death in 1990 at the advanced age of ninety-seven, Romain de Tirtoff, better known as Erté, was a frequent and much-loved guest of New York City. His visits, which were usually marked by dinners and parties in his honor, were often listed with exclamation marks in the society pages of the New York Times, and an exclusive birthday celebration was hosted by the Circle Gallery in Soho in honor of his ninety-fifth birthday.

Read More

Now at the Met

Art and Life in Thomas Hart Benton's America Today, with Randall Griffey

Rachel High, Publishing and Marketing Assistant, Editorial Department

Posted: Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Missouri native Thomas Hart Benton is often recognized as the leader of Regionalism, the 1930s artistic movement that celebrated rural life in the United States, but few know that New York was his home from 1912 to 1935. In 1930, he received his first major commission for a mural from the New School of Social Research. Called America Today, that mural is the subject of The Metropolitan Museum of Art's latest Bulletin, published to accompany the acquisition of the mural as a gift from AXA in November 2012 and its installation at the Met.

Read More

Now at the Met

What's in a Face?

Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Portraits can reveal so much about the character of the person depicted, beyond the obvious physical traits. What can you tell about the gentleman in this painting?

Read More

Follow This Blog: Subscribe

About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.