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Exhibitions

Current search results within: 1999-1989

  • SCHEDULE OF EXHIBITIONS JANUARY - APRIL 2000

    New Exhibitions
    Upcoming Exhibitions
    Continuing Exhibitions
    New and Recently Opened Installations
    Traveling Exhibitions
    Visitor Information

  • MASTERPIECES FROM LISBON'S GULBENKIAN MUSEUM ON VIEW AT METROPOLITAN MUSEUM

    Calouste Sarkis Gulbenkian Biography
    Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation

  • ROCK STYLE IS THEME FOR METROPOLITAN MUSEUM'S DECEMBER COSTUME INSTITUTE EXHIBITION

    This press kit for Rock Style includes a general press release about the exhibition, immediately following, as well as statements from the exhibition's sponsors:
    Tommy Hilfiger USA, Inc.;
    Condé Nast;
    The Estée Lauder Companies Inc.

  • A CENTURY OF DESIGN, PART I: 1900-1925

    A Century of Design, Part I: 1900-1925 — the first in a four-part series of exhibitions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art surveying design in the 20th century — will present some of the Museum's finest examples of furniture, metalwork, glass, ceramics, textiles, jewelry, and drawings from the first quarter of the 1900s. Highlighting the Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, and Art Deco movements, the exhibition will be on view in the Metropolitan Museum's Gallery for Modern Design and Architecture from December 14, 1999, through March 26, 2000.

  • CELEBRATING THE AMERICAN WING: NOTABLE ACQUISITIONS 1980-1999

    American Wing galleries and The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art On November 10, 1924, The Metropolitan Museum of Art's American Wing — the first permanent installation in an American art museum of American colonial and early Federal decorative arts and architecture — opened to the public. Seventy-five years later to the day, in celebration of this landmark anniversary, the Museum will present an exhibition of notable works acquired by gift or purchase since 1980, when spacious additional galleries designed to house American decorative arts, as well as American paintings and sculpture, were opened.

  • KOREAN CERAMICS FROM THE MUSEUM OF ORIENTAL CERAMICS, OSAKA

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present a selection of Korean ceramics from the renowned collection of the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka, beginning January 25. Representing the periods of highest achievement in the peninsula's long ceramic tradition, the 48 exquisite works in Korean Ceramics from the Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka will explore a variety of ceramic forms and techniques. Dating from the 12th to the 19th century, the works on view will include luminous jade-green celadon wares of the Koryo dynasty (918-1392) as well as superb examples of the innovative stoneware known as punch'ong and white porcelains of the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). The objects will be exhibited alongside the Metropolitan's own Korean art collection in the Museum's permanent Arts of Korea gallery, which was inaugurated in June 1998.

  • EUROPEAN HELMETS, 1450-1650: TREASURES FROM THE RESERVE COLLECTION

    The Metropolitan Museum will present European Helmets, 1450-1650: Treasures from the Reserve Collection, the third in a series of thematic installations drawn from the Museum's extraordinary collection of European headpieces, beginning January 25, 2000. Featuring some 70 helmets, many of them to go on display for the first time, the exhibition will explore the evolution, technology, form, and fashion of European head defense over two centuries. The majority of the helmets have rarely been exhibited or published in the last 50 years and, therefore, constitute a collection virtually unknown to Museum visitors, scholars, and collectors.

  • THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART OPENS WALKER EVANS ARCHIVE ON FEBRUARY 1

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art will open the Walker Evans Archive, one of the most complete single-artist archives of the 20th century, as a special research center devoted to the American photographer Walker Evans (1903-1975), on February 1, 2000. Acquired in 1994 by the Museum's Department of Photographs, the Walker Evans Archive includes Evans's black-and-white negatives, color transparencies, and motion-picture film from the late 1920s to the 1970s; the artist's original manuscripts, diaries, correspondence, and audiotape recordings of interviews and lectures; and his personal library and collections. This extraordinary trove will provide artists and scholars with a rare insight not only into the artistic achievement of Walker Evans, but also into the cultural, intellectual, and personal context of his career. The opening of the Archive coincides with the premiere of Walker Evans, the Museum's retrospective exhibition of the photographer's work, on view from February 1 through May 14, 2000.

  • THE WORLD OF SCHOLARS' ROCKS: GARDENS, STUDIOS, AND PAINTINGS

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present for more than six months beginning in February an exhibition of some 90 Chinese paintings, featuring images of ornamental rocks or landscapes inspired by the fantastic forms of such stones, complemented by more than 30 actual scholars' rocks. Drawn primarily from the Museum's holdings, and supplemented by a select number of loans from private collections, The World of Scholars' Rocks: Gardens, Studios, and Paintings – opening at the Metropolitan Museum on February 1, 2000 – will examine the Chinese taste for strangely shaped rocks during the last 1000 years, tracing through pictorial images as well as actual examples the evolution and transformation of the genre from the 11th to the 20th century.

  • NORTHERN DRAWINGS FROM THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM'S ROBERT LEHMAN COLLECTION TO BE SHOWN IN TWO ROTATIONS

    Opening February 8, 2000, the second rotation of Northern drawings from The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Robert Lehman Wing will feature 15th- and 16th-century German, Netherlandish, and French drawings and manuscripts that have not been exhibited in nearly a decade. Selected from the trove of treasured master drawings and illuminations assembled by Robert Lehman, the works on view in Northern Drawings of the 15th and 16th Centuries in the Robert Lehman Collection will be complemented by several loans from the Museum's Department of Medieval Art. Four autograph sheets by Albrecht Dürer will be among the highlights of the presentation. Works by Martin Schongauer, Hans Baldung Grien, and Maerten van Heemskerck will also be featured, in addition to drawings from the Circle of Jan van Eyck and the Circle of Rogier van der Weyden.

  • MASTERPIECES OF JAPANESE ART FROM THE MARY GRIGGS BURKE COLLECTION

    More than 200 works of Japanese art from the renowned collection of Mary Griggs Burke — a selection of ceramics, sculptures, paintings, and lacquers dating from the earliest cultures of around 3000 B.C. to the Edo period (1615-1867) — will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from March 30 through June 25, 2000. Organized chronologically, the exhibition will provide an overview of the development of Japanese art and will also explore the use of divergent artistic traditions, including those adapted from other cultures and those that reflect native tastes, within Japan.

  • SUBJECTS AND SYMBOLS IN AMERICAN SCULPTURE: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

    Nineteenth-century American artists regarded "ideal themes" — those inspired by mythology, history, and literature — as the most challenging and venerable in the hierarchy of genres. Such subjects provided an opportunity for sculptors to demonstrate their familiarity with allegorical, historical, and literary topics, their skill at incorporating identifying attributes into their compositions, and frequently also their expertise in rendering the nude.

  • ART AND ORACLE: SPIRIT VOICES OF AFRICA

    A figure sculpted in central Africa's rainforest to determine guilt or innocence, a maternity image made by an Igbo potter to enable a woman to conceive children, and a set of dice carved to decide the destiny of a Shona chief will be among the works featured in Art and Oracle: Spirit Voices of Africa, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from April 26 through July 30, 2000. Throughout history and around the world, peoples have sought the intervention of divine powers to understand their fate, and this exhibition will demonstrate the dynamic relationship between ritual practice and creative expression through some 200 artifacts from more than 50 African cultures.

  • DAVID SMITH ON THE ROOF

    A selection of works in burnished stainless steel by David Smith (1906-1965) — considered one of the most original and influential American sculptors of his generation — will be on view beginning May 15, on the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. David Smith on the Roof will mark the third consecutive single-artist installation on the Roof Garden, a 10,000 square-foot open-air space that offers a panoramic view of the Manhattan skyline and Central Park.

  • AMERICAN MODERN: 1925-1940 — DESIGN FOR A NEW AGE

    American Modern: 1925-1940 — Design for a New Age, an exhibition tracing the rise of a distinctively American modern design aesthetic through the efforts of 40 of its creative pioneers, will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from May 16, 2000 through January 9, 2001. More than 100 objects, including furniture, clocks, appliances, lamps, textiles, posters, and more, from the Museum's collection and from the John C. Waddell Collection — a major promised gift to the Metropolitan — will reveal the aesthetic, cultural, and economic forces that ultimately shaped the modern design movement in America.

  • ANNENBERG COLLECTION OF IMPRESSIONIST AND POST-IMPRESSIONIST MASTERWORKS

    Fifty-three paintings, watercolors, and drawings by 18 of the greatest artists who worked in France in the 19th and early 20th century comprise the Annenberg collection, which will return to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for six months beginning in May 2000. This annual event, now in its sixth year, provides an exceptional opportunity for visitors to experience this renowned private collection. The works are shown in the Museum's Nineteenth-Century European Paintings and Sculpture Galleries, hung together in three central rooms, surrounded by the Met's own collection of 19th-century European paintings.

  • FIREWORKS

    No form of entertainment involves so much ingenuity at so great a cost for such a dazzling — but woefully ephemeral — effect as fireworks. Many attempts have been made over the centuries to create for posterity a visual record of fireworks displays, especially those mounted in connection with official occasions, such as a noble marriage, the entry of a ruler into a city, military victories, and coronations. Before photography became prevalent, these records were most often made as prints — woodcuts, engravings, etchings, and lithographs — since these could be made in multiple impressions and could thus be distributed to a wide audience as a document or souvenir of the occasion. In celebration of the new millennium, the exhibition Fireworks will feature more than 100 prints and drawings depicting firework displays from the 16th to the early 20th century.

  • CHARDIN

    Chardin — a major loan exhibition of more than 65 works that will survey the great 18th-century artist's distinguished career as a still-life and genre painter — will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from June 27 through September 3, 2000.

  • ART AND THE EMPIRE CITY: NEW YORK, 1825-1861

    In America in the second quarter of the 19th century — between 1825, when the Erie Canal was built, and 1861, when the Civil War began — the visual arts proliferated. On September 19, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present a landmark exhibition, Art and the Empire City: New York, 1825-1861, which will explore in unprecedented depth the history of American art of this period, as epitomized in New York City.

  • CHRISTMAS TREE AND NEAPOLITAN BAROQUE CRÈCHE

    Christmas Concerts at the Met
    Christmas at The Cloisters

  • METROPOLITAN MUSEUM ANNOUNCES REOPENING OF GALLERIES FOR ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART

    October 19 marks the culmination of an 18-month-long renovation and reinstallation project at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as nearly 1,500 works from the permanent collection of the Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art return to public view. The newly reorganized galleries feature the monumental sculpture, distinctive metalwork, delicately carved ivories and seals, exquisite jewelry, and other works of art made in the ancient Near East over nearly nine millennia. A highlight is the dramatic renovation of the Assyrian relief gallery, evocative of an audience hall in the palace of Ashurnasirpal II.

  • CARLETON WATKINS: THE ART OF PERCEPTION EXPLORES WORK OF VISIONARY 19th-CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHER

    An exhibition of 98 images by Carleton Watkins (1829-1916), America's greatest landscape photographer, will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Carleton Watkins: The Art of Perception. The first large-scale examination of an often under-recognized artist, the exhibition includes more than 85 mammoth prints, including work from his famous series of the pristine and then virtually unknown Yosemite Valley, as well as many other lyrical views of the American West.

  • WILLIAM RUDIN AND ANDREW SAUL ELECTED TRUSTEES, DIANE BURKE ELECTED HONORARY TRUSTEE OF

    (September 24, 1999) – William C. Rudin and Andrew M. Saul have been elected Trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Diane W. Burke an Honorary Trustee of the Museum, it was announced recently by James R. Houghton, Chairman of the Board of the Metropolitan. The elections took place at the September 14 meeting of the Board of Trustees.

  • PORTRAITS BY INGRES: IMAGE OF AN EPOCH OPENS AT METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OCTOBER 5

    Widely regarded as the greatest portrait painter of the 19th century and one of the most brilliant draftsmen of all time, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) dominated French painting for more than half a century and left an enduring legacy, inspiring artists such as Cézanne, Degas, Matisse, and Picasso. On view October 5, 1999, through January 2, 2000, Portraits by Ingres: Image of an Epoch brings together 40 paintings and 92 drawings from every period of the artist's prodigious career, providing visitors with a unique opportunity to appreciate the refinement, originality, and beauty of Ingres's portraiture. Spanning six decades, from the last years of the Revolution to the Second Empire, the portraits in the exhibition constitute a "Who's Who" of the ruling elite in France — the aristocracy of birth, beauty, politics, wealth, and intellect.

  • ROCK 'N' ROLL TO BE THEME OF METROPOLITAN MUSEUM'S DECEMBER COSTUME INSTITUTE EXHIBITION

    The exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum will be organized in five sections that will address the synergy between rock music and fashion: Poets and Dreamers; Icons; Brilliant Disguise; Rebels; High Style. The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland will spotlight classic rock-'n'-roll performers and their pervasive influence on style in the exhibition titled Rock Style, to be launched at the Metropolitan Museum from December 9, 1999, through March 19, 2000. A selection of more than 40 major rock artists who have influenced style from the 1950s to the present will be represented by fashions from the collections of The Costume Institute and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, as well as by loans from the private collections of several of the rock stars themselves. Artists represented will include Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Aretha Franklin, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie, Tina Turner, Elton John, Mama Cass, Stevie Nicks, Bruce Springsteen, Bono, David Byrne, Grace Jones, Madonna, and Björk.

  • COSTUME AND CHARACTER IN THE AGE OF INGRES

    For the first time in its history, The Costume Institute will present an exhibition ancillary to one of The Metropolitan Museum of Art's major loan exhibitions of paintings. Costume and Character in the Age of Ingres will be on view in The Costume Institute from September 9 through November 21, 1999 — coinciding with the exhibition Portraits by Ingres: Image of an Epoch in the second-floor Special Exhibitions Galleries.

  • THE ARTIST AS COLLECTOR: MASTERPIECES FROM THE C. C. WANG FAMILY COLLECTION

    Nearly 100 works of Chinese painting collected by the renowned artist/collector C. C. Wang — who has amassed one of the two most important private collections of Chinese old master paintings of the 20th century — will be on view in The Artist as Collector: Masterpieces of Chinese Painting from the C. C. Wang Family Collection. The exhibition features the recent promised gift by the Oscar Tang family of 12 major works acquired from the C. C. Wang Family in 1997, along with some 50 additional paintings and calligraphies acquired from Mr. Wang by the Museum over the last 26 years. These works are augmented by important loans from The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Art Museum, Princeton University, The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the British Museum, and The C. C. Wang Family.

  • LANDMARK EXHIBITION OF EGYPTIAN ART OPENS AT METROPOLITAN MUSEUM ON SEPTEMBER 16

    "Egyptians were probably the first to be aware of the nobility inherent in the human form and to express it in art." — Heinrich Schafer, Principles of Egyptian Art (1919)

  • CONTEMPORARY EGYPTIAN ART AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

    Sculptures by Adam Henein and paintings by Farouk Hosny — both prominent artists working in contemporary Egypt — are the featured works in Farouk Hosny/Adam Henein: Contemporary Egyptian Artists and Heirs to an Ancient Tradition, an exhibition opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on September 14, 1999. The exhibition, which features more than 50 sculptures by Henein (of which 44 constitute a single installation) and approximately 34 paintings by Hosny, will remain on view in the Museum's first-floor galleries of Egyptian Art through January 23, 2000.

  • DAIDO MORIYAMA: HUNTER

    Daido Moriyama: Hunter, a series of 40 vintage prints of postwar Japan by one of its foremost photographers, Daido Moriyama (b.1938), is on view in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's North Mezzanine Gallery, in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing.

  • BARBARA CHASE-RIBOUD: THE MONUMENT DRAWINGS

    Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Monument Drawings, a series of 23 original works by the American artist, novelist, and poet, will be on view in the North Mezzanine Gallery of The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Lila Acheson Wallace Wing.

  • GUSTAVE MOREAU: BETWEEN EPIC AND DREAM

    To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of French artist Gustave Moreau (1826-1898), The Metropolitan Museum of Art is presenting a major exhibition — the largest retrospective of Moreau's work ever shown in the United States — featuring masterpieces from every phase of his distinguished career. Gustave Moreau: Between Epic and Dream includes nearly 175 works — some 40 paintings and 60 watercolors in addition to drawings and preparatory studies, lent primarily from the Musée Gustave Moreau in Paris, with other works drawn from public and private collections in Europe and America.

  • CéZANNE TO VAN GOGH: THE COLLECTION OF DOCTOR GACHET OPENS AT METROPOLITAN MUSEUM MAY 25

    Some 50 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and drawings that have never before been lent from the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, are the centerpiece of an exhibition devoted to the extraordinary art collection formed by Dr. Paul-Ferdinand Gachet (1828-1909), the physician who cared for Vincent van Gogh in the months prior to his suicide in 1890, and who was immortalized in several renowned portraits by the artist. The exhibition, which features more than 130 works in all, includes an additional 40 paintings and works on paper from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and other collections in Europe and America that also once belonged to the legendary Dr. Gachet, who was both friend and patron to the artists — Monet, Pissarro, Guillaumin, Renoir, Sisley, and above all, Cézanne and Van Gogh — whose works he collected.

  • JOE DIMAGGIO BASEBALL CARDS TO GO ON DISPLAY AT METROPOLITAN IN TIME FOR OPENING OF NEW YORK BASEBALL SEASON IN APRIL

    Seven rare baseball cards spanning the career of the late New York Yankees icon Joe DiMaggio — the earliest dating to his fabled rookie year of 1936 — will go on display in The American Wing of The Metropolitan Museum of Art on April 20, concurrently with the opening of the 1999 baseball season and the celebration of Joe DiMaggio Day at Yankee Stadium (April 25). The DiMaggio cards will be on view remain on view through the World Series — October 31, 1999.

  • INSTALLATIONS IN THE HOWARD GILMAN GALLERY SPRING AND SUMMER 1999

    MASTERPIECES FROM THE GILMAN PAPER COMPANY COLLECTION February 26 - May 23, 1999

  • RODIN'S MONUMENT TO VICTOR HUGO

    This loan exhibition will comprise approximately 20 sculptures by Auguste Rodin, ranging from a small terracotta sketch to a life-size portrait in marble, as well as bronze figures, all relating to Rodin's monument to Victor Hugo that was originally commissioned for the Panthéon in Paris. Although a plaster model for the work was a popular success in the Paris Salon of 1897, the completion of this version of the monument and its installation in the Panthéon never took place. A modified version of it in marble was erected in the gardens of the Palais Royal in Paris, where it stood until 1933.

  • THE NATURE OF ISLAMIC ORNAMENT, PART IV: FIGURAL REPRESENTATION

    One of the most misunderstood aspects of Islamic art is its supposed ban on figural representation. In fact — and surprising to many people — figural imagery is relatively common during many periods in various Islamic cultures. A special exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in the fall of 1999 will examine these traditions and the variety of figural forms found in Islamic art, as well as the religious issues involved and the resultant tendency toward greater abstraction in ornamentation.

  • PICASSO: PAINTER AND SCULPTOR IN CLAY

    More than 170 rarely exhibited unique ceramic works by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), created by the artist in the South of France primarily from 1947 to 1962, will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Picasso: Painter and Sculptor in Clay, from March 3 through June 6, 1999. Although Picasso is acknowledged as one of the most revolutionary artists of this century, with an unquestioned reputation as a painter, sculptor, draftsman, and printmaker, this exhibition is the first large-scale examination of his ceramic oeuvre, which he commenced at the age of 66. Intimately related in theme and subject matter to Picasso's art in other media, the subjects of these works range from still lifes to bullfights and include a lively cast of characters: a mistress and a wife, lovers and clowns, dancers and musicians, centaurs and fauns, as well as birds and fish. These join many sculpted and painted ceramics that celebrate the female form — nude and clothed, standing and seated.

  • DEVOTIONS AND DIVERSIONS: PRINTS AND BOOKS FROM THE LATE MIDDLE AGES IN NORTHERN EUROPE

    Some of the earliest extant northern European prints and books — all from The Metropolitan Museum of Art's exceptional collection of this material — will be presented in Devotions and Diversions: Prints and Books from the Late Middle Ages in Northern Europe , from May 11 through August 29, 1999, in the Museum's Karen B. Cohen Gallery and Charles Z. Offin Gallery. Forty-one German, Netherlandish, and French woodcuts and metalcuts (many of them unique impressions), several Netherlandish woodcut blockbook pages, and about twenty illustrated books, including a number of printed French Books of Hours, will be on view.

  • HANS HOFMANN AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

    The work of the noted abstract artist and influential teacher Hans Hofmann (1880-1966) will be the subject of an exhibition, Hans Hofmann at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, on view from April 13 through October 17, 1999. The focus of the exhibition will be the nine paintings of "The Renate Series" and several other paintings by Hofmann in the Museum's collection.

  • THE NATURE OF ISLAMIC ORNAMENT PART III: GEOMETRIC PATTERNS

    The third in a four-part series on Islamic ornament dating from the 9th to the 18th century, The Nature of Islamic Ornament, Part III: Geometric Patterns will open on March 17, 1999. Some 25 objects that feature predominantly geometric decoration, drawn from the Metropolitan Museum's own collection — including illuminated manuscripts, rugs, carved and inlaid woodwork, and pottery — reflect the variety of production of Islamic art and the wide range of application of geometric patterns.

  • MIRROR OF THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

    Nearly 300 outstanding examples of medieval art — all drawn from the superb holdings of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and all acquired during the last two decades — will be moved from their customary settings this spring for Mirror of the Medieval World, an important new exhibition of the art of the Middle Ages. Organized thematically, the exhibition will feature several unexpected groupings of works of art created between the fourth and the 16th century, inviting visitors to reassess familiar works and to draw stylistic comparisons among objects created for purposes as diverse as personal adornment, the activities of daily life, and liturgical rites.

  • ABAKANOWICZ ON THE ROOF

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art will open an outdoor installation of sculptures by Magdalena Abakanowicz, one of the most startlingly innovative artists of our time, on May 1, 1999. Abakanowicz on the Roof will feature a selection of figural works, including signature pieces as well as objects created during the past year that have never before been exhibited. They will be installed in the 10,000-square-foot open-air space of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, located atop the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing. The Cantor Roof Garden offers a spectacular view of Central Park and the New York City.

  • AMERICAN FOLK ART IN THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

    Paintings, watercolors, drawings, and portrait miniatures by the greatest names in American folk art — Rufus Hathaway, Edward Hicks, Joshua Johnson, Ammi Phillips, and other artists working within naive and provincial traditions in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries — will be featured in American Folk Art in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, on view in The American Wing.

  • EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY FRENCH DRAWINGS IN NEW YORK COLLECTIONS

    Throughout the 18th century, France was an artistic center whose influence reached far beyond its borders. In a culture that placed a high value on artistic inspiration and individuality, the appreciation of drawings — one of the most immediate and intimate of art forms — saw a vast expansion. Though drawings continued to play a utilitarian role in the artist's creative process, they were increasingly made as independent objects, with an eye toward display and delectation. On view February 2 through April 25, 1999, Eighteenth-Century French Drawings in New York Collections surveys the many achievements of this widely-admired period of French art, when artists such as Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Robert, David, and Greuze, among others, created images of surpassing beauty and virtuosity.

  • GUARDIANS OF THE LONGHOUSE: ART IN BORNEO

    The first American exhibition devoted exclusively to the Kenyah-Kayan art of central Borneo will open at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on April 13, 1999. With loans from museums and private collectors nationwide, Guardians of the Longhouse: Art in Borneo will feature more than 60 works exploring the theme of the supernatural and physical defense of the longhouse community in Kenyah-Kayan art. Dating from the classic period of Borneo art, from the late 19th to the early 20th century, works in the exhibition — many of which have never been displayed before — range from robust wooden figures and architectural sculpture to delicately carved items of personal adornment.

  • THE TREASURY OF SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI

    In an unprecedented collaboration, the Ministry of Culture in Rome, the Apostolic Library at the Vatican, and the Basilica and Convent of San Francesco at Assisi have organized this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition to heighten awareness of the effects of the earthquakes that devastated Assisi, Italy, in September 1997. Nearly 70 masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance panel painting, sculpture, goldsmiths' work, textiles, and manuscript illumination have been lent from the collections of the Basilica of San Francesco. These will be joined at The Metropolitan Museum of Art by an additional 30 works of art from museums and private collections throughout Europe and America in The Treasury of Saint Francis of Assisi. Among the works featured will be some of the key monuments in the development of early Renaissance art, leading up to that epoch's first flowering in the work of Cimabue and Giotto in Assisi approximately 700 years ago.

  • DOSSO DOSSI, COURT PAINTER IN RENAISSANCE FERRARA

    The first monographic survey of Dosso Dossi's work, opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art January 14, will include some 60 paintings carefully chosen to reflect the richness and quality of the artist's achievement. On view January 14 through March 28, 1999, Dosso Dossi, Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara features rarely lent masterpieces from collections in America and Europe — above all, the Borghese Gallery in Rome — and offers a unique opportunity to experience the full scope of Dosso's work, not seen since the dispersal of Ferrara's artistic treasures following the end of Este rule in the late 16th century.

  • CUBISM AND FASHION

    Cubism and Fashion — an exhibition demonstrating how the fundamental traits of Cubism in art have been translated into fashion — will open in The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art on December 10, 1998. The examples on display will range from the beginnings of Cubism in 1908 to the present day. This landmark exhibition will be launched on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of The Costume Institute Gala, known as the "Party of the Year."

  • CLAY INTO ART: SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OF CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS

    Clay into Art: Selections from the Contemporary Ceramics Collection in The Metropolitan Museum of Art brings together 61 ceramic pieces from the Museum's collection that capture an unprecedented period of creativity in ceramics and demonstrate the dramatic breadth of styles that emerged during the latter half of this century. The exhibition will include works by an international group of ceramists, from conceptually traditional vessel forms such as teapots, bowls and vases, to unconventionally monumental sculptures. This is the fourth exhibition in the Department of 20th Century Art's continuing series of shows that feature works executed in one medium.

  • CHRISTMAS TREE AND NEAPOLITAN BAROQUE CRÈCHE

    The Christmas tree and Neapolitan Baroque crèche at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, a long established yuletide tradition in New York, will be on view for the holiday season. The brightly lit, twenty-foot blue spruce — with a collection of 18th-century Neapolitan angels and cherubs among its boughs and groups of realistic crèche figures flanking the Nativity scene at its base — will once again delight holiday visitors in the Museum's Medieval Sculpture Hall. Set in front of the 18th-century Spanish choir screen from the Cathedral of Valladolid, with recorded Christmas music in the background, the installation reflects the spirit of the holiday season. There will be a spectacular lighting ceremony every Friday and Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m.

  • NATIVE AMERICANS' ARTISTIC HERITAGE ON VIEW

    Native Paths: American Indian Art from the Collection of Charles and Valerie Diker, a 20-month-long Metropolitan Museum exhibition of some 140 exceptional Native American works of art, will explore the broad cultural and artistic diversity of the Native peoples of this hemisphere — different times and places, materials and functions, peoples and traditions. More than 70 works will be shown in the first of three six-month rotations, ranging from quilled and beaded objects to pottery and basketry vessels to wood and bone sculpture. An important group of Plains Indian drawings, known today as ledger drawings, will also be on view. While some works in the Diker Collection date to the late 18th century, most date to the 19th and early 20th century. The exhibition will be on view from May 7, 1998, through January 2, 2000.