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  • Settlement Reached on Monet’s Garden at Argenteuil

  • Superb Examples of Indo-Islamic Metalwork Displayed at Metropolitan Museum This Fall

    Drawing inspiration from their rich local heritage of craftsmanship as well as from that of the larger Islamic world, metalworkers in India during the Mughal period (from the 16th through the 19th century) gave splendid form to many functional and decorative objects.

  • Jeweled Arts Exhibition at Metropolitan Museum Reveals Splendor of the Mughal Courts

    The grand imperial vision, refinement, and opulence for which the Mughal rulers of India (1526-1858) were renowned found ultimate expression in their jeweled arts. In a dazzling display opening to the public on October 18, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present "Treasury of the World": Jeweled Arts of India in the Age of the Mughals, a landmark exhibition of more than 300 spectacular examples of Mughal and other related jeweled objects from The al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait National Museum. The presentation at the Metropolitan is a pioneering effort to show Mughal-period jeweled arts, for which The al-Sabah Collection is unrivaled in scope and scale.

  • The Pharaoh's Photographer:

    When Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon opened the tomb of the ancient Egyptian king Tutankhamun in 1922, the spectacular find was captured in stunning and evocative detail by Harry Burton (1879-1940), the outstanding archaeological photographer of his day. This fall, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present some 60 photographs—primarily by Burton—made between 1906 and 1939, documenting the excavation of King Tutankhamun's tomb and some of the other major archaeological finds in Egypt. The gelatin silver prints, which come from the photographic archives of the Department of Egyptian Art, have never been shown publicly.

  • Neo-Impressionism: The Circle of Paul Signac

    To complement the major exhibition Signac 1863-1935: Master Neo-Impressionist, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present paintings, drawings, and watercolors – selected entirely from the Museum's own collections – by Charles Angrand, Henri-Edmond Cross, Maximilien Luce, Hippolyte Petitjean and other artists who, like Paul Signac, exuberantly followed the groundbreaking techniques of optical painting introduced in the 1880s by Georges Seurat. On view at the Metropolitan from October 2 through December 30, 2001, Neo-Impressionism: The Circle of Paul Signac will feature some 60 works by these artists as well as by the better-known Signac and Seurat.

  • EXTREME BEAUTY: THE BODY TRANSFORMED

    Over time and across cultures, extraordinary manipulations of the body have occurred as concepts of beauty have continued to evolve. Extreme Beauty: The Body Transformed – an exhibition opening December 6 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art – will offer a unique opportunity to see fashion as the practice of some of the most extreme methods to conform to shifting concepts of the physical ideal. Various zones of the body – neck, shoulders, bust, waist, hips, and feet – have been constricted, padded, truncated, or extended through a variety of techniques. The more than 100 costumes and accessories in the exhibition – ranging from a 16th-century iron corset to Thierry Mugler's notorious "Motorcycle" bustier – will be augmented by anthropological and ethnographic examples and by paintings, prints, and drawings, including caricatures by Gilray, Cruikshank, Daumier and Vernet.

  • DRESS REHEARSAL: ORIGINS OF THE COSTUME INSTITUTE

    Dress Rehearsal: Origins of The Costume Institute – opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on August 1 – is the second of the two-part installation (the pendent to Curios and Treasures) surveying one of the world's largest and most renowned costume collections. Costume collecting at the Metropolitan began in 1946 with the transfer of the collection of the former Museum of Costume Art, which had been founded in 1937 by a theater-oriented group of civic leaders under the direction of the New York philanthropist and savant Irene Lewisohn. That collection formed the core of The Costume Institute's now-comprehensive current holdings of more than 80,000 costumes and accessories.

  • Signac 1863-1935: Master Neo-Impressionist

    On view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from October 9 through December 30, 2001,Signac 1863-1935: Master Neo-Impressionist, will be the first major retrospective of the artist's work in nearly 40 years. Best known for his luminous Mediterranean seascapes rendered in a myriad of "dots" – and later mosaic-like squares – of color, Signac adapted the "pointillist" technique of Georges Seurat with stunning visual impact. The exhibition will feature 121 works, including some 70 oils and a rich selection of Signac's watercolors, drawings, and prints, providing an unprecedented overview of the artist's 50-year career.

  • Major Retrospective Will Survey Career of Candace Wheeler, America's First Important Female Textile and Interior Designer

    Candace Wheeler (1827-1923)—the national expert in her time on decorative textiles and interiors, one of the first women to work in the male-dominated design world of the 19th century, and a woman who devoted her life to educating young women and encouraging their careers in the field of applied arts—will be the focus of an exhibition opening October 10 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Candace Wheeler: The Art and Enterprise of American Design, 1875-1900, the first major retrospective to address the accomplishments of this remarkable woman, will feature some 105 works including textiles, wallpapers, drawings, paintings, photographs of interiors, and furniture. Much of the exhibition will demonstrate the uniquely American style of design created by Wheeler and her associates. Candace Wheeler will be on view through January 6, 2002.

  • First New York Exhibition to Focus on Photography and the Bauhaus Experience Opens June 5

    The first New York exhibition to focus on photography and the Bauhaus experience will be on view in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Howard Gilman Gallery from June 5 through August 26, 2001. Dancing on the Roof: Photography and the Bauhaus (1923-1929) will explore the period of freewheeling innovation –- which began when master instructor László Moholy-Nagy arrived at the progressive German art school and ended when photography became an official part of the school's curriculum – through some 60 photographs by a dozen artists. Many of the prints are unique and have never been exhibited; most are from New York area collections.

  • Photographs: A Decade of Collecting

    Masterpieces of early French photography and groundbreaking modern photographs created since 1960 – both the earliest and most recent chapters in the history of the 160-year-old medium – will be on display at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in an exhibition celebrating the first decade of collecting by the Museum's Department of Photographs. Photographs: A Decade of Collecting will open on June 5, 2001.

  • Terry Winters: Printed Works

    A retrospective exhibition of prints by the American artist Terry Winters will open June 12, 2001, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Ninety works created between 1983 and the present, all from the Museum's collection, will be on view through September 30 in the Helen and Michael A. Kimmelman Gallery of the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing for modern art.

  • Glass of the Sultans

    On October 2, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present the landmark exhibition Glass of the Sultans, the first-ever museum survey of rare Islamic glass and the first scholarly reassessment of this material anywhere in more than 70 years. Some 160 spectacular and precious examples from the world's preeminent collections will be shown, including Islamic glass found in archaeological sites, seventh-century works influenced by Imperial Roman glassmaking traditions, Iranian relief-cut glass (sometimes in the cameo technique), ornately gilded and enameled works from the 13th and 14th centuries, and brilliant 19th-century Persian and Indian glass. Among the diverse works on display will be tiny medallions, delicate four-inch-tall cosmetic flasks, and ornate blown-glass vessels measuring some 15 inches in height and 12 inches in diameter. Also on view will be examples of 13th- to 20th-century European glass directly inspired by Islamic glass or made for the Oriental market. The exhibition will feature more than a dozen works from the Metropolitan's prestigious collection.

  • Beyond the Easel: Decorative Painting by Bonnard, Vuillard, Denis, and Roussel, 1890–1930

    A unique exhibition Beyond the Easel: Decorative Painting by Bonnard, Vuillard, Denis and Roussel, 1890-1930, will provide American audiences a rare opportunity to experience the decorative projects carried out in France between 1890 and 1930 by Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Vuillard, Maurice Denis, and Ker Xavier Roussel. On view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from June 26 through September 9, 2001, the exhibition consists of approximately 80 paintings and folding screens on loan from international public and private collections.

  • The Annenberg Collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Masterpieces

    Fifty-three paintings, watercolors, and drawings by 18 of the greatest artists who worked in France in the 19th and early 20th centuries comprise the Annenberg collection, which returns to The Metropolitan Museum of Art for six months beginning May 24, 2001. This annual event, now in its eighth year, provides an exceptional opportunity for visitors to view this renowned collection, which is installed in three central rooms within the Museum's Nineteenth-Century European Paintings and Sculpture Galleries.

  • Three Events in June to Celebrate William Blake Exhibition at Metropolitan Museum of Art

    In celebration of the exhibition William Blake, The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Concerts & Lectures series will present three programs in June featuring, respectively, the distinguished poets Stanley Kunitz, Galway Kinnell, and Nancy Willard; poet, songwriter, and rock singer Patti Smith accompanied by guitarist Oliver Ray; and New York University professor of fine arts Robert Rosenblum.

  • Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche

    The Christmas tree and Neapolitan Baroque crèche at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, a long-established yuletide tradition in New York, will be on view for the holiday season beginning late November. The brightly lit, 20-foot blue spruce – with a collection of 18th-century Neapolitan angels and cherubs among its boughs and groups of realistic crèche figures flanking the Nativity scene at its base – will once again delight holiday visitors in the Museum's Medieval Sculpture Hall. Set in front of the 18th-century Spanish choir screen from the Cathedral of Valladolid, with recorded Christmas music in the background, the installation reflects the spirit of the holiday season. There will be a spectacular lighting ceremony every Friday and Saturday evening at 7:00 p.m.

  • Recent Acquisitions of Art from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas on View this Summer

    The geographic expanse and cultural diversity covered by the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas will be highlighted this summer when a selection of works acquired by The Metropolitan Museum of Art over the past five years goes on view at the Museum, beginning May 22. The exhibition African, Oceanic, and Ancient American Art: Recent Acquisitions will include some 70 works from such widely diverse places as the Republic of Vanuatu in the South Pacific, the country of Ethiopia in northeastern Africa, and the central highlands of Mexico and will demonstrate the breadth of department's collecting interests. Equally varied are the functions to which the works were put, the materials from which they are made, and the eras in which they were produced. They range in date from the end of the second millennium B.C. to 1998.

  • Joel Shapiro on the Roof

    Five sculptures by renowned American artist Joel Shapiro (born 1941) are currently on view in the 2001 installation of The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. Drawn from public and private collections, Joel Shapiro on the Roof includes three large cast bronze and two painted cast aluminum sculptures, dating from 1989 to the present. Three have not been exhibited previously in New York, and two have been newly created. The works are exhibited in the 10,000-square-foot open-air space that offers spectacular views of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline. The installation marks the fourth consecutive single-artist installation on the Roof Garden.

  • Franz Liszt's Grand Piano

    The last piano owned by famed Hungarian composer and pianist Franz Liszt (1811-86) – known as a revolutionary figure of romantic music and the one of the great virtuoso pianists – is currently on view in The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments at The Metropolitan Museum of Art through July 23. Manufactured around 1865 by the French company Erard, the grand piano was owned by Liszt during the last 15 years of his life and was used by him primarily for composing and teaching. It was lost after Liszt's death but was rediscovered in 1991 by the Italian pianist Carlo Dominici, the current owner of the instrument, with its soundboard miraculously intact. After a period of careful restoration, this historic instrument has been returned to playing order.