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METROPOLITAN MUSEUM LECTURES IN THE GRACE RAINEY ROGERS AUDITORIUM

JANUARY, FEBRUARY, AND MARCH 2009

For tickets, call the Concerts & Lectures Department at 212-570-3949 or visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, where updated schedules and programs (including additional lectures that are free with Museum admission) are available. Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday–Thursday 10–5:00, Friday and Saturday 10–7:00, and Sunday noon–5:00. Student discount tickets are available for some events; call 212-570-3949.

Tuesday, January 6, at 11 a.m.Dada and Surrealism: From Duchamp to Dalí, presented by art historian Marian Burleigh-Motley. This five-part series focuses on the personalities of the men and the little-known women involved in two 20th-century movements that were styles of life rather than of art: Dada, which emerged during World War I, and Surrealism, which evolved in the decades leading up to World War II. The series opens with Dada Cabaret, Cinema, and New Kinds of Art in Zurich: Jean Arp, Sophie Taeuber; Anti-art and the Cult of the Machine in New York: Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, Beatrice Wood, and Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. This series is made possible in part by The Marks Family Foundation. (Series continues on January 13, 20, 27, and February 3)
Series tickets (5 Tuesdays): $100
Single tickets: $23

Wednesday, January 7, at 6 p.m.Rubens Meets "Miami Vice": The Art of the Heist. Art historian and author Charles Scribner III recounts the 1985 theft of two prized paintings created by Peter Paul Rubens for King Philip IV from a remote Spanish Museum. The dramatic story continues with Scribner's own great Walter Mitty adventure—his recruitment as a Rubens expert by U.S. Customs for an undercover sting in South Beach, Miami, six years later, to recover one of the stolen masterpieces, the exquisite painting Aurora.
Tickets: $23

Saturday, January 10, at 6 p.m.Contemporary Artists: Classics and Comers, presented by Robert Storr, Dean of the Yale University School of Art. This three-part series explores the subtle patterns of creative interchange and competition that exist between older artists who are working today at the top of their form—Louise Bourgeois, John Baldessari, Lucian Freud, Ellsworth Kelly, Raoul De Keyser, Jasper Johns, and Gerhard Richter—and their younger counterparts, including Kiki Smith, Jenny Saville, Lisa Yuskavage, Odili Donald Odita, and Luc Tuymans, who are equally active in defining contemporary art. The series begins with Estranged Images: Richter, Johns, and Tuymans. This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund. (Series continues on January 17 and 24)
Series tickets (3 Saturdays): $60
Single tickets: $23

Tuesday, January 13, at 11 a.m.Dada and Surrealism: From Duchamp to Dalí, presented by art historian Marian Burleigh-Motley. This five-part series, which began on January 6, focuses on the personalities of the men and the little-known women involved in two 20th-century movements that were styles of life rather than of art: Dada, which emerged during World War I, and Surrealism, which evolved in the decades leading up to World War II. The series continues with Dada in Berlin: John Heartfield, Hannah Höch; Cologne: Max Ernst, Jean Arp; and Hanover: Kurt Schwitters. This series is made possible in part by The Marks Family Foundation. (Series continues on January 20, 27, and February 3)
Series tickets (5 Tuesdays): $100
Single tickets: $23

Tuesday, January 13, at 6 p.m.Old Masters, New World, presented by author and former Forbes and Wall Street Journal reporter Cynthia Saltzman, recounts the story of an unprecedented boom in the art market when, in the late 19th century, America's new industrial tycoons began to vie for Europe's extraordinary old masterpieces, laying claim to works by Vermeer, Titian, Rembrandt, and others and causing a major migration of art across the Atlantic.
Tickets: $23

Wednesday, January 14, at 6 p.m.Salute to the 1920s and 1930s, presented by David Garrard Lowe, author of Art Deco New York, with singer KT Sullivan. This four-part series pays tribute to London and New York in the extraordinary period between the First and Second World Wars—focusing on Art Deco hotels, stately ocean liners, the sophisticated songs of Noël Coward, and the elegance of the Prince of Wales. The series opens with An Evening with Noël Coward, conceived and narrated by David Garrard Lowe with songs performed by KT Sullivan. This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund. (Series continues on January 21, 28, and February 4)
Series tickets (4 Wednesdays): $80
Single tickets: $23

Saturday, January 17, at 6 p.m.Contemporary Artists: Classics and Comers, presented by Robert Storr, Dean of the Yale University School of Art. This three-part series explores the subtle patterns of creative interchange and competition that exist between older artists who are working today at the top of their form—Louise Bourgeois, John Baldessari, Lucian Freud, Ellsworth Kelly, Raoul De Keyser, Jasper Johns, and Gerhard Richter—and their younger counterparts, including Kiki Smith, Jenny Saville, Lisa Yuskavage, Odili Donald Odita, and Luc Tuymans, who are equally active in defining contemporary art. The series continues with Abstraction Plural: Kelly, De Keyser, and Odita. This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund. (Series continues on January 24)
Series tickets (3 Saturdays): $60
Single tickets: $23

Tuesday, January 20, at 11 a.m.Dada and Surrealism: From Duchamp to Dalí, presented by art historian Marian Burleigh-Motley. This five-part series, which began on January 6, focuses on the personalities of the men and the little-known women involved in two 20th-century movements that were styles of life rather than of art: Dada, which emerged during World War I, and Surrealism, which evolved in the decades leading up to World War II. The series continues with From Dada to Surrealism in Paris, 1917–23: André Breton, Marcel and Suzanne Duchamp, Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Man Ray, Francis Picabia. This series is made possible in part by The Marks Family Foundation. (Series continues on January 27 and February 3)
Series tickets (5 Tuesdays): $100
Single tickets: $23

Wednesday, January 21, at 11 a.m.In Choirs of Angels: Illuminated Music Manuscripts, lecturer and radio commentator Thomas Forrest Kelly joins Metropolitan Museum Curator of Medieval Art Barbara Drake Boehm in an examination of the Museum's little-known collection of Italian musical manuscripts. Created on the eve of the Renaissance, Italian choir books marry heavenly hymns beloved by Dante to jewel-like paintings praised by Vasari. This lecture is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Choirs of Angels: Painting in Italian Choir Books, 1300–1500, on view at The Metropolitan Museum through April 12. The exhibition is made possible by the Michel David-Weill Fund. Tickets: $23

Wednesday, January 21, at 6 p.m.Salute to the 1920s and 1930s, presented by David Garrard Lowe, author of Art Deco New York. This four-part series, which began on January 14, pays tribute to London and New York in the extraordinary period between the First and Second World Wars—focusing on Art Deco hotels, stately ocean liners, the sophisticated songs of Noël Coward, and the elegance of the Prince of Wales. The series continues with London in the 1920s and 1930s: Claridge's and the Dorchester; Streamlined Cinemas and Chic Shops. This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund. (Series continues on January 28 and February 4)
Series tickets (4 Wednesdays): $80
Single tickets: $23

Saturday, January 24, at 6 p.m.Contemporary Artists: Classics and Comers, presented by Robert Storr, Dean of the Yale University School of Art. This three-part series explores the subtle patterns of creative interchange and competition that exist between older artists who are working today at the top of their form—Louise Bourgeois, John Baldessari, Lucian Freud, Ellsworth Kelly, Raoul De Keyser, Jasper Johns, and Gerhard Richter—and their younger counterparts, including Kiki Smith, Jenny Saville, Lisa Yuskavage, Odili Donald Odita, and Luc Tuymans, who are equally active in defining contemporary art. The series concludes with The Beautiful and Unbeautiful: Freud, Yuskavage, and Saville. This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.
Series tickets (3 Saturdays): $60
Single tickets: $23

Tuesday, January 27, at 11 a.m.Dada and Surrealism: From Duchamp to Dalí, presented by art historian Marian Burleigh-Motley. This five-part series, which began on January 6, focuses on the personalities of the men and the little-known women involved in two 20th-century movements that were styles of life rather than of art: Dada, which emerged during World War I, and Surrealism, which emerged in the decades leading up to World War II. The series continues with Surrealist Painting, 1924–29: Joan Miró, André Masson, Max Ernst, Yves Tanguy, and René Magritte. This series is made possible in part by The Marks Family Foundation. (Series continues on February 3)
Series tickets (5 Tuesdays): $100
Single tickets: $23

Wednesday, January 28, at 6 p.m.Salute to the 1920s and 1930s, by David Garrard Lowe, author of Art Deco New York. This four-part series, which began on January 14, pays tribute to sophisticated London and New York in the extraordinary period between the First and Second World Wars—focusing on Art Deco hotels, stately ocean liners, the songs of Noël Coward, and the elegance of the Prince of Wales. The series continues with New York in the 1920s and 1930s: The Finale of Urban Elegance. This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund. (Series continues on February 4)
Series tickets (4 Wednesdays): $80
Single tickets: $23

Thursday, January 29, at 6 p.m.Amore: The Art of Love in Renaissance Italy, presented by Andrea Bayer, Curator of European Paintings, examines the great tradition of art associated with love and marriage in Renaissance Italy, including 15th-century cassoni, grand chests carved and painted with scenes from Roman history and the Bible, and 16th-century marriage paintings by Botticelli, Titian, and Lorenzo Lotto. This lecture is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Art and Love in Renaissance Italy, on view at the Metropolitan Museum through February 16. The exhibition is made possible by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. Additional support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The exhibition was organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets: $23

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Tuesday, February 3, at 11 a.m.Dada and Surrealism: From Duchamp to Dalí, presented by art historian Marian Burleigh-Motley. This five-part series, which began on January 6, focuses on the personalities of the men and the little-known women involved in two 20th-century movements that were styles of life rather than of art: Dada, which emerged during World War I, and Surrealism, which evolved in the decades leading up to World War II. The series concludes with Surrealism in the 1930s: Salvador Dalí, Alberto Giacometti, and Pablo Picasso. This series is made possible in part by The Marks Family Foundation.
Tickets: $23

Wednesday, February 4, at 6 p.m.Salute to the 1920s and 1930s, presented by David Garrard Lowe, author of Art Deco New York. This four-part series, which began on January 14, pays tribute to London and New York in the extraordinary period between the First and Second World Wars—focusing on Art Deco hotels, stately ocean liners, the sophisticated songs of Noël Coward, and the elegant style of the Prince of Wales. The series concludes with The Prince of Wales: Golden Symbol of an Age. This series is supported by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.
Series tickets (4 Wednesdays): $80
Tickets: $23

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Friday, March 27, at 7 p.m.Paula Robison: Dancing with Bach, Partita in A Minor, a lecture-performance presented by flutist Paula Robison with baroque dancer Catherine Turocy and harpsichordist James Richman, is an in-depth examination of J. S. Bach's Partita in A Minor, BWV 1013, including an investigation of the dances of the period that inspired the composer. The evening concludes with a complete performance of the Partita.
Tickets: $23

Note: All ticketed lectures include entrance to the Metropolitan Museum's galleries, including The Cloisters museum and gardens, on the day of the event.

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December 16, 2008

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