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Met Museum Presents – February 2013

Performances & Talks Include:
* Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet Performing the Complete Beethoven String Quartets, and Talks by Edmund Morris, Kathryn Calley Galitz, and Marsha Morton
* “Lincoln Seen and Heard” with Stephen Lang and Harold Holzer
* The Sau-Wing Lam Collection in Action: Eight Seasons, Vivaldi’s and Piazzolla’s
* A Judy Collins Valentine


Performances 

Saturday, February 2, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Sau-Wing Lam Collection in Action: The Eight Seasons
This is the second of four concerts (remaining dates are April 12 and May 4, 2013) in which New York’s dynamic Salomé Chamber Orchestra presents programs featuring its members, and guest artists including violinists Daniel Hope, Karen Gomyo, Philippe Quint, and Chee Yun perform on instruments from The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed Instruments, a selection of which are on view in the Metropolitan Museum’s André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments through June 30, 2013.
In this program, violinist and Salomé co-founder Sean Avram Carpenter and violist David Aaron Carpenter are the soloists in Astor Piazzolla’s Four Seasons and Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.
These concerts are generously supported by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
This is the first time that musical instruments from the renowned collection assembled by Sau-Wing Lam (1923-1988) are on public display in the United States. The instruments on view—nine violins and one viola—include such masterpieces as the Baltic violin by Giuseppe Guarneri “del Gesù” (1698-1744) and the Scotland University and Bavarian violins by Antonio Stradivari (1644-1737). The opening date of the installation, December 18, coincided with the 275th anniversary of the death of Antonio Stradivari.
The Salomé Chamber Orchestra, New York City’s electrifying new conductor-less string ensemble, was formed in September 2009. Founded by the Carpenter siblings (violinists Sean and Lauren and violist David), Salomé is dedicated to advancing the works of both underappreciated and well-recognized chamber composers, and to performing a broad range of repertoire from Baroque to contemporary. Salomé’s intelligent, artistic, and interdisciplinary approach to music- making produces refreshing and vibrant performances that attest to the wealth of talent that can be found in this great city and in this generation of musicians. www.salomechamber.org
Tickets: $35 

Tuesday, February 12, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
“Lincoln Seen and Heard” with Stephen Lang and Harold Holzer
On the 203rd anniversary of Lincoln’s birth, the Metropolitan Museum presents a special performance of “Lincoln Seen and Heard,” a program that has been performed at the White House, Ford’s Theatre, the George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton Presidential Libraries, and other venues. Actor Stephen Lang (Avatar, Terra Nova, A Few Good Men) reads the words of Lincoln, as the Metropolitan Museum’s Harold Holzer, an award-winning Lincoln scholar, narrates and illustrates with Lincoln photographs. Lincoln was frequently photographed at precisely the time of his most important speeches, and this program combines his words and pictures to evoke the real Lincoln—from his days as prairie politician to the presidency and immortality.
Tickets: $30 

Thursday, February 14, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
A Judy Collins Valentine
Folk legend Judy Collins makes her third Metropolitan Museum appearance with a Valentine’s Day-themed program on the day itself.
This concert is supported by the estate of Kathryn Walter Stein.
Ticket holders are invited to enjoy a three-course dinner in the Members Dining Room, featuring classic food and wine pairings for $100 per person (both pre- and post-concert dinner seatings are available); call 212-570-3975. In addition, the Petrie Court Café and Wine Bar offers an elegant three-course prix-fixe menu paired with a glass of sparkling wine for $60 per person; call 212-570-3964.
Judy Collins has thrilled audiences worldwide with her unique blend of interpretative folksongs and contemporary themes. Her impressive career has spanned more than 40 years. Her most recent recording, Bohemian, a collection of songs inspired by the 1960s music scene in Southern California, was released in 2011 on her own label, Wildflower Records. www.judycollins.com
Tickets: $65

Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations
Endellion String Quartet
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Marsha Morton, Edmund Morris
February 15–24, 2013

* Bring the Kids to Beethoven!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability) to any Framing Beethoven event. For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations
, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven. Complementing the performances are talks by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edmund Morris on how Beethoven made art out of his disability, Metropolitan Museum art historian Kathryn Calley Galitz on the rise of Romanticism among Beethoven’s art contemporaries, and by art historian Marsha Morton on the context in which his music became central to theories of romanticism and the sublime.
The acclaimed Endellion String Quartet will make its first New York appearances since 1995 with these six concerts. The ensemble, in residence at Cambridge University, marked its 30th anniversary in 2009 with the release of a boxed set of the complete Beethoven string quartets on Warner Classics. Listen to the Endellion String Quartet playing Beethoven.
Of the recordings, which were also named a Gramophone Editor’s Choice of 2009, The Strad said, “The performances of the central canon of 17 quartets are the best overall from the past decade or so. ... The Endellion String Quartet...has steadily evolved from a neat and tidy group into something a little shaggier and far more penetrative, especially in Beethoven. All four players are remarkable artists and Andrew Watkinson is a leader of international stature.”
The Endellion String Quartet enters its 34th year in the 2012-13 season. In addition to the Beethoven set, the quartet’s 30th anniversary year was marked by new commissions of six ‘Quartettini’ from Robin Holloway and a new piece by Roxanna Panufnik and poet Wendy Cope; involvement in Phil Grabsky’s documentary film In Search of Beethoven; a DVD of performance of Beethoven works; a series of performances of Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ incorporating the
Endellion’s commission of text from Andrew Motion especially for the piece; and concerts throughout the U.K., and in Europe, China, Japan, and Korea. The Endellion continues its residency (now in its 20th year) at the University of Cambridge, and was involved in special celebratory concerts at the University that recently celebrated its 800th anniversary. www.endellionquartet.com 

Friday, February 15, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: “Setting the Stage: A Few Notes on Romantic Painting” with Metropolitan Museum art historian Kathryn Calley Galitz
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, complemented by related talks, including this one by Metropolitan Museum art historican Kathryn Calley Galitz.
The rise of Romanticism in the early 19th century signaled a rejection of Neoclassical ideals. Reason and order gave way to emotion and untamed nature, and the notion of the man of genius captured the popular imagination. This talk focuses on works by Beethoven’s contemporaries, including Delacroix and Friedrich, setting the stage for the Romantic revolution.
Tickets: $25 

Friday, February 15, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 2; Op. 59, No. 3; and Op. 130.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Saturday, February 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 6; Op. 18, No. 1; and Op. 132.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Sunday, February 17, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 4; Op. 74; and Op. 131.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Tuesday, February 19, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: “The Roar That Lies on the Other Side of Silence” with Edmund Morris
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, complemented by related talks.
This lecture will be Sign Language interpreted.
This talk is by Edmund Morris, the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of Theodore Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan, who is also a classically trained pianist and the author of Beethoven: The Universal Composer. In this program, which will include audio clips and keyboard examples, Morris explores how a deaf genius made art out of his disability, and examines the ways in which many of Beethoven’s most exquisite—or sometimes frightening—sound effects may have arisen from his deafness.
Morris’s published This Living Hand and Other Essays, which includes his writings on Beethoven and other subjects, in October 2012.
Tickets: $25 

Friday, February 22, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Beethoven: The Sights and Sounds of the Romantic Sublime with Pratt Institute Professor of Art History Marsha Morton
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, and related talks, including this one by Marsha Morton, professor of art history at Pratt Institute.
Beethoven began composing in the 1790s, when theories of romanticism and the sublime were being formulated in Germany. This talk will consider the context in which his music came to embody the dark drives, metaphysical essence, and “endless longing” (E.T.A. Hoffmann) that inspired generations of musicians, artists, and writers.
Tickets: $25 

Friday, February 22, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 5; Op. 135; and Op. 59, No. 2.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Saturday, February 23, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 3; Op. 95; and Op. 127.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Sunday, February 24, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This final program features the Quartets Op. 59, No. 1; and Op. 130 with Grosse Fuge.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40 

Every Friday and Saturday, 5:00–8:00 p.m. on the Balcony Bar—Free with admission
ETHEL and Friends
ETHEL, the acclaimed string quartet that Pitchfork.com described as “a necessary jet of cold water in the contemporary classical scene,” began as resident ensemble at the Metropolitan Museum’s Balcony Bar in October. Marking the first time that a prominent musical group has been featured in that venue, ETHEL will perform there each Friday and Saturday evening on a regular basis, sometimes with friends and collaborators, throughout the year. The quartet will also select musical groups from ETHEL’s expansive list of notable colleagues to perform when the group is on the road. This new programming initiative will provide a variety of musical experiences to Met audiences, delivered by a range of ensemble types and compositions. 
Click here for the schedule of performers.
The Balcony Bar serves appetizers and cocktails on the second-floor balcony overlooking the Great Hall. Three sets of performances between 5:00 and 8:00 p.m. will take place each Friday and Saturday.
Free with Museum admission

Talks and Special Gallery Tours

Wednesday, February 13, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in Bonnie J. Sacerdote Hall
“Matisse: In Search of True Painting”
Rebecca Rabinow, Curator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
This event is part of the Met Salon Series, which offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments.

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is one of the most acclaimed masters of his generation. The critic Clement Greenberg, writing in The Nation in 1949, called him a “self-assured master who can no more help painting well than breathing.” However, painting had rarely come easily to Matisse. Throughout his career, he questioned, repainted and reevaluated his work. Curator Rebecca Rabinow explains how Matisse used his completed canvases as tools, repeating compositions in order to compare effects, gauge his progress, and, as he put it, “push further and deeper into true painting.” While this manner of working with pairs, trios, and series is certainly not unique to Matisse, his need to progress methodically from one painting to the next is striking. For Matisse, the process of creation was not simply a means to an end but a dimension of his art that was as important as the finished canvas.
This talk is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Matisse: In Search of True Painting, on view December 4, 2012-March 17, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible in part by Vacheron Constantin.
Additional support is provided by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund and the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund.
The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in collaboration with the Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, and the Centre Pompidou, Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets: $27


* For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
* Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 10-4:30 and Sunday noon-4:30.
* Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
* 30 & Under Rush: $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
* Bring the Kids!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.


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January 7, 2013

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