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The Metropolitan Museum of Art Announces the 2013-14 Season of Met Museum Presents – Performances and Talks that Amplify, Enrich, and Reinterpret the Met's Collection and Galleries

* Alarm Will Sound Artist Residency
* Gallery-Hopping Concerts: A John Zorn Birthday Celebration, and The Grand Tour: Early Music in the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250-1800
* Four Chamber Operas, Including Two World Premieres and a NY PHIL BIENNIAL Presentation with Alan Gilbert
* Calder Quartet Performing Complete Bartók Quartets and More with David Longstreth and Iva Bittová
* TEDxMET Independently Organized TED Conference: Icons
* William Christie, Patti Smith, Gotham Chamber Opera, The Declassified, Concerto Köln, The Hilliard Ensemble, Tenet, Rosanne Cash, Venice Baroque Orchestra, Judy Collins, Vienna Boys Choir, the Salzburg Marionette Theater, and More
* Talks featuring Adam Gopnik, Alain de Botton, and Others


The 2013-14 season of Met Museum Presents, the Metropolitan Museum’s recently renamed series of performances and talks, continues to take direct inspiration from the Museum’s vast collection and galleries and the mastery they represent, with events featuring some of the world’s most esteemed performers, scholars, and thinkers. This is the second year programmed by Concerts & Lectures General Manager Limor Tomer.

“This new season positions the Met at the center of a multi-disciplinary conversation with a stunning range of voices and ideas,” said Metropolitan Museum Director Thomas P. Campbell. “From period music to provocative discussions, this season’s line-up uses the collection to take creative risks and stress our global relevance. It truly demonstrates the Met's ability to inspire artists of all kinds and engage every visitor's imagination.”

“This season is about the Met as a generative force,” continued Limor Tomer. “We are inviting performers and thought-leaders to dig into the tissue of the Met itself, and engage with the ideas that the building generates. Three performances literally take you from gallery to gallery! I hope this will be a revelatory, unexpected, and fun season for our audiences.”


Highlights of the 2013-14 Season

* An Artist Residency by Alarm Will Sound, Alan Pierson, Music Director—The acclaimed ensemble of composer/performers will perform, work with curators and educators, and conduct talks and workshops in the second such season-long artist residency at the Met. Among the performances are a site-specific work created for The Charles Engelhard Court in The American Wing with music by Aphex Twin, Tyondai Braxton, and Edgard Varèse and choreography by John Heginbotham; an all-Steve Reich program featuring the New York premiere of Radio Rewrite, and a program dubbed “The Permanent Collection,” in which, in the words of Music Director Alan Pierson, “Alarm Will Sound imagines its own musical version of the Metropolitan Museum's permanent collection, developing a canon for the new music ensemble.”

* Old Masters, New Quarters—Inspired by the comprehensive renovation and re-installation of the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250-1800, a series of events features a “Grand Tour” through these galleries with leading early music ensembles and artists Tenet, Dark Horse, QuickSilver, and harpsichordist Jory Vinikour; and programs spotlighting masters of the Italian Baroque with countertenor Philippe Jaroussky and the Venice Baroque Orchestra; and a program on the influence of Italy on J.S. Bach with Concerto Köln.

* Exhibition- and Collection-Inspired Concerts—Special exhibitions and the collection as a whole are complemented with a program spotlighting the parallels drawn between line in etchings and line in music with The Declassified; a concert saluting the newly installed Venetian galleries by Philippe Jaroussky and the Venice Baroque Orchestra; a program representing a millennium of music with The Hilliard Ensemble; and Roseanne Cash headlining a concert saluting the Martin guitar.

* Chamber Opera—Two chamber operas commissioned by the Metropolitan Museum will have world premieres at the Met: the Lembit Beecher/Hanna Moscovitch I Have No Stories to Tell You, about a photojournalist’s return home from the Middle East, performed by the Gotham Chamber Opera and conducted by Neal Goren in the Medieval Sculpture Hall, preceded by Monteverdi’s Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda in the Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court; and I Was Here I Was I, a Metropolitan Museum-commissioned work combining narratives surrounding the history of The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing, by Kate Soper (composer) and Nigel Maister (librettist/director) to be performed in the Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art and at The Temple of Dendur by Alarm Will Sound, conducted by Alan Pierson. This series also includes a new production of HK Gruber’s Gloria – a Pigtale, conducted by New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert, with designer/director Doug Fitch, as part of the Philharmonic’s inaugural NY PHIL BIENNIAL city-wide new-music festival; and two new productions by the Salzburg Marionette Theatre in its 100th anniversary season: The Ring Cycle, Abridged, set to a classic recording of Wagner’s operas by Sir Georg Solti leading the Vienna Philharmonic and a cast featuring Hans Hotter, Birgit Nilsson, Kirsten Flagstad, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau,; and Alice in Wonderland featuring 19th-century English country dance music.

* Masters at the Met—Four singular events celebrate iconic composers and performers: John Zorn—A Museum-Wide Celebration marks the native New York composer’s 60th birthday with an event featuring musicians performing all new compositions by Zorn in various galleries. These works were created and chosen specifically for their organic and sonic relevance to the gallery spaces. Arvo Pärt in the Temple celebrates the Estonian composer with a performance of Pärt’s Kanon Pokajanen for four-part a cappella choir by the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing. Baroque music pioneer William Christie leads Juilliard-415 in the Vélez Blanco Patio. Rock legend Patti Smith returns to the Met with a tribute to 12th-century German writer, composer, and mystic Hildegard of Bingen. Grammy-winning vocalist Jane Monheit sings a Valentine’s Day program and folk legend Judy Collins returns to the Met with an evening of Celtic folk songs.

* Bartók String Quartet Cycle Performed by the Calder Quartet with special guests David Longstreth of Dirty Projectors and Iva Bittová—Expanding on the Metropolitan Museum tradition of string quartet residencies, this three-concert series features the six string quartets of Bela Bartók, a touchstone of 20th-century chamber music, enhanced by music of Janácek, Peter Eötvös, and David Longstreth of the Dirty Projectors, performed by the Calder Quartet, who will be joined by David Longstreth and vocalist/violinist Iva Bittová.

* 1913: The World Implodes—Adam Gopnik hosts a series of four conversations that put the milestone year in perspective, and two seminal works of that time are performed in striking settings. Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (1913) will be performed in a two-piano arrangement by Duo Amal (along with Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, which premiered in 1813, in a two-piano arrangement), and Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire (1912) will be performed by the American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME) alongside a companion piece written in 2013. The four conversations, covering New York, Paris, Europe at large, and Africa, feature writer Alain de Botton, art critic Sebastian Smee, and historian Kwame Anthony Appiah.

* Holiday Concerts—The Met’s annual holiday concerts will feature the Vienna Boys Choir, The Crossing, Calmus Ensemble Leipzig, Salomé Chamber Orchestra, and João Carlos Martins, who will conduct an all-Bach program with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s.

* TEDxMET: Icons—A day of talks by thought leaders and artists focusing on the theme of “Icons”—signature buildings, stories, lives, and beliefs—from writers, scientists, artists, musicians, and Met curators.

* Spark—A new conversation series hosted by Julie Burstein, Peabody Award-winning creator of public radio’s Studio 360, explores ideas and issues through the lens of the Met’s collection. Among the fall events is “Fabric Changes Everything: The Interwoven World,” about the vital role of fabric in human history, with speakers including designers Eileen Fisher and Paul van Zyl.

* Talks, Salon Series, etc.— A host of talks on the Met’s collections and special exhibitions feature Met curators and Met favorites including Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman of the Department of European Paintings; Maxwell Hearn, Douglas Dillon Curator in Charge of the Department of Asian Art; Amelia Peck, Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Decorative Arts; Rebecca Rabinow, Leonard A. Lauder Curator of Modern Art; H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture; Kathy Galitz; Barry Lewis; and Jerrilynn Dodds.

The collaboration between the Metropolitan Museum and WQXR will continue in the 2013-14 season with the recording, broadcasting, and streaming of a selection of concerts and events.

Two recently-introduced ticket programs, Bring the Kids! ($1 tickets when accompanied by a full-price purchase), and 30 & Under Rush ($15 day-of-event tickets)—both subject to availability—are growing, with over 600 purchased in the 2012-13 season as of the end of March 2013.

Tickets for the Met Museum Presents 2013-14 season of events are available now:

* For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
* Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 11—3:30; beginning July 1, Monday-Saturday 11—3:30.
* Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
* 30 & Under Rush: $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event on select performances (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
* Bring the Kids!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) for select performances when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.


The Metropolitan Museum of Art thanks the Stavros Niarchos Foundation for its support of this season’s Met Museum Presents.

Additional Funding has been provided by the New York State Council on the Arts.


Alarm Will Sound Artist Residency
Alarm Will Sound, the 20-member New York group of composer/performers led by Music Director Alan Pierson, is known for bringing vitality, intelligence, and a sense of adventure to a broad variety of musical and theatrical expression. The acclaimed ensemble will perform, work with curators and educators, and conduct talks and workshops in a season-long artist residency at the Met. “Alarm Will Sound brings to their performances a deep-rooted sense of discovery that stems from their creativity as composers and their appetites for all kinds of art,” said Limor Tomer. “Their nimbleness and their work in a variety of media make them wonderful collaborators with the Met.”
“Alarm Will Sound is so excited for our year-long residency at the Metropolitan Museum,” said Alan Pierson. “Each of our concerts connects in a different way with the Metropolitan Museum's collections and with the building itself: the new theatrical work I Was Here I Was I and the music/dance collaboration Twinned both create new theatrical experiences specific to two of the Met’s most iconic galleries, and for The Permanent Collection, Alarm Will Sound imagines its own musical version of the Metropolitan Museum's permanent collection, developing a canon for the new music ensemble.” www.alarmwillsound.com
In the course of the 2013-14 season, the group will conduct public talks, workshops, and tours relating to the themes raised by the residency. The highlights of the residency are four concerts:

Friday, October 11, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Alarm Will Sound: The Permanent Collection
In this concert, Alarm Will Sound performs works they would “exhibit” if they had a permanent collection: Music by Ligeti, Wagner, and Schoenberg.

Saturday, November 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Alarm Will Sound: All-Steve Reich Concert
The New York premiere of Radio Rewrite (2013), a piece based on songs by Radiohead, highlights a program that features Reich’s Clapping Music, Piano Counterpoint, City Life, Four Genesis Settings, and New York Counterpoint.

Thursday, February 20, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Charles Engelhard Court
Alarm Will Sound: Twinned
A site-specific music/dance performance created specifically for The Charles Engelhard Court in The American Wing showcases choreography by John Heginbotham and music by Tyondai Braxton, Aphex Twin, and Edgard Varèse.

Friday, June 20, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in the Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art and at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
Alarm Will Sound: I Was Here I Was I by Kate Soper and Nigel Maister—World Premiere, Metropolitan Museum Commission
Inspired by the architecture and holdings of the Met’s Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art as well as the writings of Victorian adventurer and Egyptologist Amelia Edwards, I Was Here I Was I, a Metropolitan Museum commission for the Alarm Will Sound residency, takes the audience on a journey through space and time, exploring The Temple of Dendur as both a destination and an object of historical and aesthetic appropriation. A 19th-century woman sails down the Nile discovering beauty and brutality in equal measures. In ancient Nubia, two brothers drown in the Nile, setting in motion a chain of events that will see their temple saved from a similar fate millennia later and brought to the Metropolitan Museum. A contemporary tourist confronts The Temple of Dendur. Thus, generations seek to control memory and secure their place in history. The work uses spoken text, song, and both live and recorded music, and the audience travels through the Met’s Egyptian galleries to experience the performance.


Old Masters, New Quarters
This series celebrates the completion of the Museum’s New European Paintings Galleries, 1250-1800, with an event that takes place within those galleries, and two concerts that spotlight related musical traditions.

Tuesday & Wednesday, September 17 & 18, 2013, at 8:00 p.m. in the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250-1800
The Grand Tour
This unprecedented evening takes audience members into four different galleries to experience, one after another, four different programs by some of the world’s leading early music artists: ensembles Tenet, Dark Horse, and QuickSilver, and harpsichordist Jory Vinikour perform music that harmonizes with the content of the individual galleries.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Concerto Köln: Bach and the Italians
One of Europe’s most prominent period instrument ensembles, Concerto Köln focuses on the Italian influences at work in the music of J.S. Bach, and the great cross-fertilization that occurred when artists traveled throughout Europe, infusing their new host countries with ideas and culture from their homes. The program features dall’Abaco’s Concerto a più istrumenti, Op. 5, No. 3; Locatelli’s Concerto Grosso in G Minor, Op. 1, No. 12; Vivaldi’s Cello Concerto in D Minor, RV 407, and Sammartini’s Sinfonia in A Major; as well as Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 4 & 5.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Philippe Jaroussky & Venice Baroque Orchestra: The Venetian Baroque
Acclaimed French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky joins the Venice Baroque Orchestra, the estimable Italian period instrument ensemble, and its music director Andrea Marcon, for a program of their core Italian Baroque repertoire. Jaroussky sings arias by Nicola Porpora: “Mira in cielo” from Arianna, “Si Pietoso il tuo labbro” from Semiramide riconosciuta, “Nel già bramoso petto” and “Le limpid’onde” from Ifigenia in Aulide, “Come nave in ria tempest” from Semiramide d’Assiria, “Dall’amor piu sventurato” from Orfeo, and “Alto Giove” and “Nell’attendere il mio bene” from Polifemo. The orchestra plays Vivaldi’s Concerto in F Major for Two Horns, Strings, and Continuo, RV 538, and Geminiani’s Concerto Grosso for Two Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D Minor “La Follia,” after Corelli, Op. 5, No. 12.
This concert complements the Museum’s newly reinstalled Venetian Renaissance gallery.


Chamber Opera @ the Met
For the first time, the Metropolitan Museum will hold world premiere performances of two chamber operas. One of them will be a commission of the Museum, presented in the Museum’s galleries. The New York Philharmonic continues its collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum with the presentation of a chamber opera, conducted by Music Director Alan Gilbert, that is part of its new NY PHIL BIENNIAL; and audience favorite the Salzburg Marionette Theatre returns to the Met with two new productions in its 100th anniversary season.

Friday, December 13, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Saturday, December 14, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Salzburg Marionette Theatre
The Ring Cycle, Abridged

This first production to music by Wagner in the Salzburg Marionette Theatre’s history is an abridged, two-hour version of the Ring of the Nibelung, created in cooperation with the Salzburg State Theatre under the direction of Philippe Bruner. This 2012 production, which features two live actors with the marionettes, is set to a classic Decca recording of Sir Georg Solti leading the Vienna Philharmonic, the Vienna State Opera Chorus, and a cast including Hans Hotter, Birgit Nilsson, Kirsten Flagstad, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. www.marionetten.at
These programs are made possible by the Brodsky Family Foundation.

Saturday, December 14, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Sunday, December 15, 2013, at 3:00 in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Salzburg Marionette Theatre
Alice in Wonderland

This production of Lewis Carroll’s timeless classic Alice in Wonderland premieres in September 2013. It features a newly recorded soundtrack voiced by actors in English, with 19th-century English folk songs performed on violin and piano.
These programs are made possible by the Brodsky Family Foundation.

Wednesday & Thursday, February 26 & 27, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in the Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court and the Medieval Sculpture Hall
Wednesday, February 26, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. HD Transmission in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

Gotham Chamber Opera
Neal Goren, Conductor
Robin Guarino, Director
Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda by Claudio Monteverdi
I Have No Stories to Tell You by Lembit Beecher—World premiere

This double-bill program by New York’s acclaimed Gotham Chamber Opera, conducted by Artistic Director Neal Goren, presents a 17th-century battle set piece and a brand new work, each presented in a Metropolitan Museum gallery. Gotham Chamber Opera composer-in-residence Lembit Beecher and librettist Hannah Moscovitch respond to Monteverdi’s 1624 depiction of fierce battle set during the First Crusade, Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda, by focusing on the after-effects of war. Their 30-minute opera, I Have No Stories to Tell You, a commission by Gotham Chamber Opera for performance in the Medieval Sculpture Hall, depicts a photojournalist’s return home after an extended assignment in the Middle East. She is haunted by her experiences and reluctant to discuss them with her husband, who no longer understands her. The glimpses of her life that we see over the course of a year depict her struggles and a relationship driven to the brink. Scored for a period instrument ensemble and inspired by interviews with soldiers and army psychologists, I Have No Stories to Tell You explores the effects of war on one’s identity and sense of home. www.gothamchamberopera.org
Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda will be presented in the Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court. The audience will then proceed to the adjacent Medieval Sculpture Hall for the performance of I Have No Stories to Tell You. Featured singers will be mezzo-soprano Beth Clayton and baritone Craig Verm. Both productions are directed by Robin Guarino.
Instruments from the Metropolitan Museum’s Musical Instruments collection will be used in the performance.
A live HD transmission of the first performance will take place in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.

Thursday, May 29, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Friday, May 30, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Sunday, June 1, 2014, at 2:00 p.m., in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium

An NY PHIL BIENNIAL Event
Alan Gilbert, Conductor
Doug Fitch, Designer/Director
Giants Are Small, Production
In collaboration with The Juilliard School
Gloria – a Pigtale by HK Gruber

The popular children’s book by Rudolf Herfurtner about the lovely lady pig Gloria with curly golden hair, and the envious sty-mates who consider her a deviant, combines anthropomorphic folk imagery with darker overtones about race and diet. Viennese composer HK Gruber, known for a fanciful, eclectic style in such works as Frankenstein!!, adapted the story as a chamber opera for five singers and 10 instrumentalists that premiered in 1994. About a 2004 production, the Hamburger Morgenpost said, “The pigsty is a parable about life, society and all of us, completely avoiding moralising undertones: a wonderful pig’s breakfast…. Gruber’s music sways between rustic folklore and jazz in dashing distortion."
New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert conducts this new production and continues a Philharmonic collaboration with designer/director Doug Fitch and Giants Are Small, which has included productions of Le Grand Macabre (2010), The Cunning Little Vixen (2011), and the upcoming A Dancer’s Dream: Two Works by Stravinsky (June 27-29, 2013).
“Gruber’s whimsical, child-like veneer covers up a deep and complex set of truths,” commented Alan Gilbert about the work. “This production is a fantastic opportunity to work with this wonderful composer, forces from the Juilliard School, and of course with the brilliant Doug Fitch and Giants Are Small.”
This event is part of the inaugural NY PHIL BIENNIAL, a two-week immersive exhibition showcasing the best of today’s new music through orchestral events, guest ensembles, and concerts with small ensembles with partners across New York City. www.nyphil.org

Friday, June 20, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in the Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art and at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
Alarm Will Sound
Alan Pierson, Conductor
I Was Here I Was I by Kate Soper and Nigel Maister—World Premiere, Metropolitan Museum Commission

Inspired by the architecture and holdings of the Met’s Lila Acheson Wallace Galleries of Egyptian Art as well as the writings of Victorian adventurer and Egyptologist Amelia Edwards, I Was Here I Was I, a Metropolitan Museum commission for the Alarm Will Sound residency, takes the audience on a journey through space and time, exploring The Temple of Dendur as both a destination and an object of historical and aesthetic appropriation. A 19th-century woman sails down the Nile discovering beauty and brutality in equal measures. In ancient Nubia, two brothers drown in the Nile, setting in motion a chain of events that will see their temple saved from a similar fate millennia later and brought to the Metropolitan Museum. A contemporary tourist confronts The Temple of Dendur. Thus, generations seek to control memory and secure their place in history. The work uses spoken text, song, and both live and recorded music, and the audience travels through the Met’s Egyptian galleries to experience the performance.
The work uses spoken text, song, and both live and recorded music, and the audience travels through the Met’s Egyptian galleries to experience the performance. Alarm Will Sound Music Director Alan Pierson conducts.


Exhibitions Amplified, and More
Saturday, November 23, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Declassified: Line and Expression
The acclaimed young New York ensemble The Declassified, called “a new collective of some of the brightest young classical musicians in the world” by Time Out New York, presents a program that, like etchings, creates momentum and interplay through the use of musical lines, and makes evident the connection between the free and improvisational approach of the etching process and music written using similar techniques. The program combines tastes of 18th-century France—Rameau’s Les Boréades and Couperin’s Les Barricades Mysterieuses (a clear example of how musical lines can build upon themselves and take flight)—with contemporary works: a playful orchestration of the Couperin work by Thomas Ades, Golijov’s Tenebrae, Nico Muhly’s Motion, and Pärt’s Fratres.
This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Artists and Amateurs: Etching in Eighteenth-Century France, which will be on view at the Museum October 1, 2013—January 5, 2014.
This concert is made possible by the Xerox Foundation.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
The Hilliard Ensemble: ARKHANGELOS, A Millennium of Music
The Hilliard Ensemble, England’s celebrated a cappella vocal quartet, performs a concert encompassing a millennium of Christian music. The program, which complements the extensive arts of Byzantium in the Met’s collection, takes its name from a setting of Greek Orthodox text that composer Ivan Moody wrote for the ensemble, which is on the program. The concert also features music from Armenia, 13th-century France, and 16th-century England, and celebrates the ensemble’s continuing relationship with several living composers: Arvo Pärt (Estonia), Vache Sharafyan (Armenia), and Katia Tchemberdji and Alexander Raskatov (Russia).

Thursday, February 13, 2014, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Unknown “Lincoln-Douglass” Debate
Harold Holzer, Historian
Though they met at the White House several times and regularly exchanged views, Abraham Lincoln and African-American leader Frederick Douglass never publicly argued the crucial issues of slavery, freedom, and racial justice. This is the Lincoln-Douglass debate that never happened; but in this performance piece—using words from their actual correspondence and commentary, illustrated by period paintings, photographs, and sculpture—Harold Holzer brings Lincoln and Douglass face-to-face for an unprecedented confrontation. Holzer will be joined by accomplished performers to portray Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

Saturday, February 22, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Rosanne Cash and Friends: Early American Guitars
Martin Guitars have a long history with the Cash family. Johnny Cash had dozens of Martins, including some that had belonged to Mother Maybelle Carter of the Carter family of country music fame. Grammy Award-winning musician and songwriter Rosanne Cash celebrates Martin Guitar’s legacy as well as her own family’s history with the company through a program featuring music written and performed on the legendary instruments.
This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Early American Guitars, which will be on view at the Museum January 14—December 7, 2014.


1913: The World Implodes—Performances and Conversations
In 1913 the world shook and rattled. Europe was on the verge of committing suicide. Africa exploded into European and American consciousness, technology was on a dizzying trajectory, and music was losing its grip on tonality, slipping loudly into entropy. Two path-breaking works were premiered within eight months of each other: Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire (October 16, 1912) and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring (May 29, 1913). Two concerts at the Metropolitan Museum this season present these works in striking settings and, to put the music of this period into context, Met Museum Presents offers a series of four conversations curated and hosted by New Yorker Critic at Large Adam Gopnik.

Performances:
Saturday, November 2, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME)
Called by Time Out New York “one of new York’s brightest new music indie-bands,” ACME performs Pierrot Lunaire, Schoenberg’s Expressionist melodrama of 21 songs for voice and piano, violin, cello, flute, and clarinet, alongside a new work composed a century later.

Saturday, November 9, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Duo Amal
Twenty-eight-year-old pianists Yaron Kohlberg of Israel and Bishara Haroni of Palestine are the preeminent pianists of their generation in their respective homelands. Together they are Duo Amal, and on this program they will perform arrangements of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 (1813) and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring (1913). Stravinsky himself wrote the arrangement for piano four-hands.

Conversations:
Wednesday, October 2, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Why Europe Committed Suicide
Adam Gopnik, Critic at Large, The New Yorker
Adam Gopnik offers an overview of the cultural life of Western Europe and America a century ago—at a moment when the modernist movement seemed to reach a new apex of innovation in the visual arts, music, and literature—and then asks how that banquet turned, in a matter of months, into the catastrophic tragedy of World War I. Why did a civilization at a height of confidence and accomplishment become suicidal? And could we fall to a similar fate today?

Wednesday, October 9, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Why New Art Mattered
Sebastian Smee, Pulitzer Prize–Winning Art Critic, Boston Globe
In 1913, the triumph of Synthetic Cubism in France and the Armory Show in the United States brought modernism to America, thus introducing to the world a new wealth of creative innovation, from the found objects of Duchamp to the hermetic poetry of Picasso and Braque. Sebastian Smee explores the overt and hidden wellsprings of innovation in art that made history, and asks what its true and best legacy is a century later. Adam Gopnik hosts.

Wednesday October 16, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
How Proust Changed Our Minds
Alain de Botton, Writer
Alain de Botton, the much-celebrated author of How Proust Can Change Your Life and one of the leaders of London’s The School of Life, celebrates the centenary of the publication of the first volume of Marcel Proust’s masterpiece In Search of Lost Time with a lecture on the story and ultimate spell cast by a book publication that, baffling to so many on its first appearance, has improbably become one of the most beloved books of our time. Adam Gopnik hosts.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Africa and the West
Kwame Anthony Appiah, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values, Princeton University
Yaëlle Biro, Assistant Curator, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Mr. Appiah and Ms. Biro join Adam Gopnik to untangle the moment when America and Europe became keenly and irrevocably aware of Africa as a generative force, and reveal how this intercontinental awareness continues to inform us. Adam Gopnik hosts.


Bartók String Quartet Cycle
Bartók String Quartets Performed by the Calder Quartet with special guests David Longstreth of Dirty Projectors and Iva Bittová
The six string quartets of Béla Bartók, composed between 1908 and 1939, are a towering oeuvre of 20th-century chamber music. In this series, the young California-based Calder Quartet, called “superb” by The New York Times and “formidable” by The New Yorker, perform the quartets in three concerts along with music focusing on Bartók’s deep debt to the human voice, with the help of two special guest artists. http://calderquartet.com
This series is made possible in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.

Saturday, October 12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Calder Quartet
Bartók’s String Quartets Nos. 1 and 5 are joined on the program by Hungarian composer Peter Eötvös’s Korrespondenz (1992), which the composer describes as follows: “[The] string quartet reproduces the dramatic relations between Leopold Mozart and his son, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, through excerpts from their correspondence.” Eötvös sets this in three connected scenes, complete with stage directions about the attitude of the two characters. The first violin and viola represent Wolfgang Mozart and the second violin and cello give his father’s side of the “conversation.”

Friday, November 1, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Calder Quartet with David Longstreth
For this program featuring the Bartók Quartets Nos. 3 and 4, the Calder Quartet is joined by David Longstreth, founder of the rock band Dirty Projectors, for performances of his new compositions created specifically for this program, as well as new arrangements of Dirty Projectors songs for voice and string quartet.

Friday, November 22, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Calder Quartet with Iva Bittová
For this program featuring the Bartók Quartets Nos. 2 and 6, the Calder Quartet is joined by the Czech singer, violinist, and composer Iva Bittová for music by Janácek, Bartók, and improvisations for voice and string quartet. Ms. Bittová, according to The New York Times, “represents a peculiarly Eastern European blend of tradition and modernity … She takes on the role of the singer as town crier whose voice animates old myths and current news.”


Masters at the Met
Four events celebrate iconic composers and performers:

Friday, September 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Patti Smith
Rock legend Patti Smith returns to the Met with a tribute to Hildegard of Bingen, the 12th-century German Benedictine abbess who was a writer, composer, philosopher, visual artist, mystic, and visionary.

Saturday, September 28, 2013, from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. in Various Galleries
John Zorn—A Museum-Wide Celebration
A recipient of the 2006 MacArthur Award, New York City native John Zorn is a composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist, and multi-instrumentalist, whose influential body of work defies categorization. To celebrate his 60th birthday (September 2, 2013), the Met presents an unprecedented Museum-wide musical event devoted to the work of one composer. For an entire day, the Museum’s galleries pulsate with John Zorn’s restless and electric creativity, as musicians perform in various galleries. Some of the works presented on this day are new works commissioned by the Metropolitan Museum for the occasion. Others are existing pieces, specifically selected for their organic and sonic relevance to particular gallery spaces.
Performers include Mike Patton, voice; Kenny Wollesen, percussion; Carol Emanuel, harp; John Zorn, organ; Jay Campbell, cello; Chris Otto, violin; Erik Friedlander, cello; and others.
Performances will begin in the Great Hall with a new work, an opening antiphonal fanfare for six trumpets; and continue at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing with Gnostic Preludes; the Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court with an organ solo by John Zorn; the Medieval Sculpture Hall with Holy Visions; the Van Rensselaer Hall in the American Wing with All Hallow’s Eve; a gallery of Abstract Expressionism, featuring Jackson Pollock’s painting Autumn Rhythm (No. 30), with a solo by John Zorn on alto saxophone; the Oceania galleries with selections including Dark River; the Assyrian gallery with a solo cello work; the Vélez Blanco Patio with Mycale; The Charles Engelhard Court with The Alchemist; and concluding at The Temple of Dendur with selections from Six Litanies for Heliogabalus.

Saturday, February 15, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
A Valentine from Jane Monheit
The Grammy-nominated jazz and popular vocalist sings a special program in celebration of Valentine’s Day.

Friday, April 11, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in the Vélez Blanco Patio
William Christie
Featuring Juilliard-415

Harpsichordist, conductor, musicologist, teacher, and founder of the unique ensemble Les Arts Florissants, William Christie has renewed the appreciation of Baroque music in France. An acknowledged master of tragédie-lyrique as well as opéra-ballet, Christie conducts Juilliard’s period-instrument ensemble, Juilliard-415, in the Met’s Vélez Blanco Patio, whose gracefully arcaded galleries, elaborately carved marble capitals, windows, and doorframes were part of an early 16th-century castle.
This program is developed in collaboration with the Juilliard School’s Historical Performance Department.

Thursday, May 8, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Judy Collins: Coming Home
Internationally acclaimed singer-songwriter Judy Collins returns to the Metropolitan Museum with a night of her favorite Celtic folk songs and stories that created the backbone of American folk music.
This concert is made possible by the estate of Kathryn Walter Stein.

Monday, June 2, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
Arvo Pärt in The Temple of Dendur
Featuring The Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

Widely considered Arvo Pärt’s masterpiece, Kanon Pokajanen, a 1997 composition for a four-part a cappella choir, will be performed in the acoustically and visually dramatic setting of The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing. This meditative and powerful piece, a setting of the Canon of Repentance to Our Lord Jesus Christ, an Orthodox hymn, is sung with the singers arranged in a circle, surrounded by the audience. Performing the work is the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, Tõnu Kaljuste, Director, which made the definitive recording of the work in 1998 under Pärt’s supervision.


Holiday Concerts
Saturday, December 7, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
João Carlos Martins with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s—Bach for the Holidays
Brazilian pianist and conductor João Carlos Martins conducts the Orchestra of St. Luke’s in an all-Bach program. Martins is known for overcoming his struggles with hand injuries to record Bach’s complete keyboard works, and for founding the Bachiana Philharmonic and the Bachiana Youth Orchestra in Brazil.

Sunday, December 8, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Calmus Ensemble Leipzig
Founded in the birthplace of Johann Sebastian Bach, Calmus Ensemble Leipzig is one of the most successful vocal groups in Germany. The ensemble makes its Metropolitan Museum debut with a holiday program built around music by Bach.

Monday, December 9, 2013, at 6:30 & 8:45 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Vienna Boys Choir
Back by popular demand, the famed choir returns to the Met with its annual holiday program.
These concerts are made possible by the Mrs. Donald Oenslager Fund.

Friday, December 20, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Salomé Chamber Orchestra
After their 2012-13 concert series playing the rare instruments of the Sau-Wing Lam Collection, the Salomé Chamber Orchestra returns to the Met with a program of seasonal music.

Sunday, December 22, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Crossing
After their critically-acclaimed performance during the Met’s holiday concert series in 2012, The Crossing returns with a program of seasonal music.


TEDxMet: Icons
Saturday, October 19, 2013, 10:00 a.m.—6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Met presents its first TEDx conference: a daylong celebration of signature buildings, singular stories, modern lives, and medieval beliefs, featuring speakers and performers from a range of disciplines. These “ideas worth spreading” from writers, scientists, artists, musicians, and Met curators, are presented in the signature full-throttle TED style.
This independent TEDx event is curated and planned by Met Museum Presents. Created in the spirit of TED’s mission, “ideas worth spreading,” the TEDx program will feature a hugely colorful and diverse roster of artists, scientists, and thought leaders who will take on the notion of icons, and how we make them, break them, and become them.
Check the website for the schedule of speakers.
Made possible by Adrienne Arsht.


Spark
A new conversation series hosted by Julie Burstein, Peabody Award-winning creator of public radio’s Studio 360, explores ideas and issues through the lens of the Met’s collection. Each cabaret-style program gathers artists, thought leaders, and performers from theater, film, politics, literature, science, and pop culture to engage in wide-ranging, fresh conversations and performances.
This series is supported by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.

Tuesday, November 5, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Fabric Changes Everything: The Interwoven World
Eileen Fisher, Fashion Designer
Amelia Peck, Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Decorative Arts, and Manager, The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art
Paul van Zyl, Fashion Designer

Pull on a thread from a bolt of cloth, and you unravel a story of empires, espionage, poverty, and a fabric trade that upended social order. In this program, Met curator Amelia Peck describes a moment in the 17th century when bed linens were the most valuable thing one owned, Paul van Zyl tells of his journey from human-rights activist to creator of luxury fashion brand Maiyet, and designer Eileen Fisher talks about her company’s focus on sustainability and human rights as well as beautiful clothes. This evening of illustrated conversation explores the “interwoven globe” and how fabric can, and did, change everything.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800, which will be on view at the Museum September 10, 2013–January 5, 2014. The exhibition is made possible in part by The Coby Foundation, Ltd., The Favrot Fund, and the Quinque Foundation.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Painting and Provocation
Simone Dinnerstein, Pianist
Sabine Rewald, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Curator of Modern Art
Deborah Tolman, Psychologist and Author
Dar Williams, Singer

Met curator Sabine Rewald describes Balthus’s 1938 painting Thérèse Dreaming as “the epitome of dormant adolescent sexuality.” Ms. Rewald will be joined by pianist Simone Dinnerstein, who plays one of Balthus’s favorite Mozart sonatas. Psychologist and author Deborah Tolman talks about her book Dilemmas of Desire (2005), in which teenage girls speak candidly about their sexual curiosity and confusion. And Dar Williams sings a few of her songs that capture beautifully the dreams and desires of girls. Intimate, revealing, disturbing, and inspiring, the stories told this evening will explore what Thérèse may have been dreaming about.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations, which will be on view at the Museum September 24, 2013–January 13, 2014. The exhibition is made possible in part by the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation.


Met Salon Series
The Met Salon Series offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an intimate and informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments. Events take place in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade 1500–1800
Amelia Peck, Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Decorative Arts, and Manager, The Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art
Melinda Watt, Associate Curator, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts
John Guy, Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art
Joyce Denney, Independent Scholar of Asian Art
Marika Sardar, Research Associate, Department of Islamic Art
Amy Bogansky, Research Assistant, The American Wing

In an unprecedented museum-wide collaboration, curators and scholars from across the Met have come together to create an exhibition with a global scope. In this conversation, the team converges to discuss its investigation into the relationship between the textile trade, industry, and world economics, and the emergence of what can be considered the first global visual language.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800, which will be on view at the Museum September 10, 2013–January 5, 2014. The exhibition is made possible in part by The Coby Foundation, Ltd., The Favrot Fund, and the Quinque Foundation.
This lecture is made possible in part by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.

Wednesday, November 13, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Out of the Darkness: Jacopo Bassano’s The Baptism of Christ—A Venetian Masterpiece
Andrea Bayer, Curator, Department of European Paintings
Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge, Paintings Conservation

Jacopo Bassano’s last great masterpiece, The Baptism of Christ, has now undergone a technical examination and treatment that have confirmed its extraordinary quality and led to significant new observations about the artist’s technique and the issue of “non-finito” (“not-finished”). Andrea Bayer and Michael Gallagher discuss the findings of their study and the importance of Bassano’s work in the context of the Museum’s newly conceived Venetian Renaissance gallery.
This lecture is made possible by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
What’s Chinese About Contemporary Chinese Art?
Maxwell Hearn, Douglas Dillon Curator in Charge of the Department of Asian Art
Maxwell Hearn examines a distinct subset of art produced by Mainland Chinese artists from the 1980s to the present; namely, a contemporary “ink aesthetic” in which references to traditional pictorial and calligraphic concepts suggest a conscious effort on the part of artists to engage with and transform inherited Chinese art forms—to extend, question, or subvert them—as a defining feature of their artistic vision.
This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China, which will be on view at the Museum December 10, 2013—April 6, 2014.
This lecture is made possible by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
The American Bison: Live and Sculpted
Patrick Thomas, Vice President & General Curator and Associate Director, Bronx Zoo, Wildlife Conservation Society
Thayer Tolles, Curator, The American Wing

The North American bison captured the popular imagination as a symbol of the Old West. Sculptors produced bronze statuettes representing the bison as a metaphor for a bygone past, basing their work in many cases on visits to urban zoos. Their eastern destination of choice was the Bronx Zoo, which opened to the public in 1899, and led efforts to display bison in an appropriate habitat setting and to repopulate the breed in its native West. Patrick Thomas and Thayer Tolles examine the impact and interconnectedness of artistic representations and conservation efforts, past and present, involving this iconic animal.
This program is in conjunction with the exhibition The American West in Bronze, 1850-1925, which will be on view at the Museum December 17, 2013—April 13, 2014. The exhibition is made possible in part by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation and The Henry Luce Foundation.
This lecture is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.


Talks
Tuesday, September 24; Thursday, October 3; and Thursday, October 24, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
My Met
Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings
Why do we respond to some works of art at first encounter while others remain elusive, revealing themselves to us only slowly, over time? Keith Christiansen discusses some of the pictures that have meant the most to him as well as those he has come to love over time. He also talks about the comprehensive reinstallation of the European paintings collection that will have been just inaugurated, as well as some important acquisitions that he thinks have taken the collection—and him—in a new direction.
This series is made possible by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.

Thursday, October 3, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Grand Central Terminal—A Century of Greatness
Barry Lewis, Architectural Historian
More than one hundred years ago, at the same time that the Metropolitan Museum was being built on upper Fifth Avenue, the New York Central Railroad married steel construction and electric train traction with a beaux-arts vision of the city that reimagined New York on a 20th-century scale. Grand Central Terminal is an amalgam of modernist efficiency and neoclassical grandeur; but that very Yankee synthesis created a city within a city of transit hub, skyscraper commercial buildings, and an apartment-house boulevard, Park Avenue, that stretched to 97th Street. A look at American urbanism when cities—not suburbs—were on our minds, and our major city, New York, was entering the category of “world-class capital.”

Thursdays, October 10 & 24, and November 7, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Masterworks from the Met
Three Masterpieces from the Age of Empires: Caravaggio, Velázquez, and Rubens

Jerrilynn Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
The Baroque period yielded some of the most vital and brilliant artists of all time. Opulent courts, powerful patrons, colliding cultures, strengthening religions, and increasingly complex politics provided the backdrop for painting to become a potent expression of the moment. This series explores a work from the Met’s collection by each of three monumental figures of this remarkable age. From different corners of Europe, these great masters provide three different interpretations of Baroque art.
October 10: Caravaggio (The Denial of Saint Peter, 1571-1610)
October 24: Velázquez (The Supper at Emmaus, 1622–23)
November 7: Rubens (Venus and Adonis, mid- or late 1630s)
This series is made possible in part by the Samuel White Patterson Lecture Fund.

Thursday, October 10; Thursday, October 17; Wednesday, November 20; Thursday, December 5; Wednesday, December 11; and Thursday, December 19, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Patriots, Pashas, and Peasants: French Painting from Delacroix to Courbet
Kathy Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
The 1820s witnessed the birth of Romanticism, as Delacroix, Ingres, and other French artists embraced new subjects, inspired by cross-Channel exchanges and the lure of the exotic. The Paris Salon of 1824 launched the battle between the Romantics and the Classicists, an aesthetic struggle that defined a generation of French artists. By mid-century, the modern-life subjects of Courbet and Manet threatened to subvert the artistic establishment, setting the stage for the Impressionist revolution.
This series is made possible by The Arthur Gillender Fund.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, at 2:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Dr. Albert Barnes and The Barnes Collection
Marlene Barasch Strauss, Art Historian
Having developed eyedrops for newborns, Dr. Albert Barnes amassed a fortune, which he used to build the greatest private collection of Post-Impressionist and early modern art in the world. Paintings by Monet, Renoir, Cézanne, Van Gogh, Seurat, Matisse, and Picasso, among others—cherished names of 19th- and 20th-century French painting—were installed in the limestone mansion he established as a school, not a museum, for the purpose of study. How Barnes assembled that collection during the Great Depression and the subsequent removal of the collection from Merion, Pennsylvania, to Philadelphia are the subjects of this lecture.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Canticle of the Birds of the Poet Attar
Michael Barry, Department of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University
The world-famous Canticle of the Birds, the most beautiful intact Persian manuscript in the Metropolitan Museum, was illustrated for a king in Herat in present-day Afghanistan in 1487. Created by Islam’s greatest artists of the book, the work was completed in 1609 for presentation to Iran’s royal shrine at Ardabil, holy burial ground of the shahs. This talk illuminates some of the prodigiously rich mystical symbolism of the manuscript’s art—the flight and fusion of all the world’s soul-birds into the radiance of the Divine Sun-Bird—in light of some of the most glorious Islamic paintings from the Persian and Indian regions, in the Metropolitan’s collection.

Tuesdays, March 11, March 25, and April 8, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
“Innocents Abroad”: Nineteenth-Century American Painters in Europe
H. Barbara Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture, The American Wing
Most leading 19th-century American painters sought instruction and inspiration in Europe. This series focuses on their studies in England (Whistler, Sargent, and others), Germany (Leutze, Chase, and others), and France (Eakins, Cassatt, and others); their pursuit of the picturesque in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere; and the effect of these experiences on their art, whether they remained abroad or returned home.
This series is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.

Thursdays, April 24 and May 1, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Life and Times
Rebecca Rabinow, Leonard A. Lauder Curator of Modern Art, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
Each lecture in this ongoing series delves into the unique and fascinating life of one particular masterpiece within the Metropolitan Museum’s collection. Explore the unique personalities who created, contributed to, and cherished these extraordinary works of art. The series begins with a look at Juan Gris’s Violin and Playing Cards on a Table (1913), a colorful Cubist still life painted in the foothills of the Pyrénées Mountains on the eve of World War I. The focus of the second lecture is Henri Matisse’s Three O’Clock Sitting (1920), which he created on the sunny Riviera while teaching one of his favorite models how to paint.
April 24: The Life and Times of Juan Gris’s Violin and Playing Cards on a Table (1913)
May 1: The Life and Times of Henri Matisse’s Three O’Clock Sitting (1920)
This series is made possible by the Mrs. Joseph H. King Fund.

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April 30, 2013





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