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Met Museum Presents – Spring 2013 Schedule

Please note that events marked with “***” are now being announced.
These include:


* Dan Deacon Site-Specific Music/Video Piece in The Charles Engelhard Court
* Seven Words, Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross in a Multimedia Performance
* Liars in The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
* So Percussion & Man Forever
* Giulio Cesare: Met Meets Met Featuring David Daniels
* The Art & Science Dating Game with DJ Spooky
* Documenting War Today with Sebastian Junger
* From Canvas to Costume with Tim Gunn, Janie Bryant, Julie Taymor, Catherine Zuber
* Zaha Hadid in Conversation
* Glittering Images: An Evening with Camille Paglia


* For tickets, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets or call 212-570-3949.
* Tickets are also available at the Great Hall Box Office, which is open Tuesday-Saturday 10-4:30 and Sunday noon-4:30.
* Tickets include admission to the Museum on day of performance.
* 30 & Under Rush: $15 tickets for ticket buyers 30 years and younger, with proof of age, the day of the event on select performances (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
* Bring the Kids!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.


Performances

Saturday, February 2, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Sau-Wing Lam Collection in Action: The Eight Seasons
This is the second of four concerts (remaining dates are April 12 and May 4, 2013) in which New York’s dynamic Salomé Chamber Orchestra presents programs featuring its members, and guest artists including violinists Daniel Hope, Karen Gomyo, Philippe Quint, and Chee Yun perform on instruments from The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed Instruments, a selection of which are on view in the Metropolitan Museum’s André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments through June 30, 2013.
In this program, violinist and Salomé co-founder Sean Avram Carpenter and violist David Aaron Carpenter are the soloists in Astor Piazzolla’s Four Seasons and Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.
Sean Carpenter says: “For the Vivaldi Four Seasons, I am intending to perform each season on a separate Stradivari violin from each period of the maker's prolific output spanning 40 years. This will be the first time in over 25 years that the Four Seasons will feature four separate Antonio Stradivari violins since the eminent musician Salvatore Accardo performed at the fifth Cremona Festival in Cremona, Italy (as part of the Stradivari Cremona Exhibition of 1987).
"The first season, ‘Spring,’ will be performed on a 1694 Stradivari long-pattern violin known as the ‘Bonvalot, Lady Margaret’ (this instrument is slightly longer than a normal ‘full-size’ violin). The second season, ‘Summer,’ will feature the Metropolitan Museum's own golden-period’ Stradivari from 1711 known as the ‘Antonius.’ The third season, ‘Fall,’ will feature the 1720 Stradivari (from the end of the ‘golden period’), the ‘Bavarian’ from the Lam Collection. The final season, ‘Winter,’ will feature the 1734 ‘Scotland University’ Stradivari also from the Lam Collection. This last violin is significant in that Stradivari constructed it only three years before his death in 1737.
These concerts are made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
This is the first time that musical instruments from the renowned collection assembled by Sau-Wing Lam (1923-1988) are on public display in the United States. The instruments on view—nine violins and one viola—include such masterpieces as the Baltic violin by Giuseppe Guarneri “del Gesù” (1698-1744) and the Scotland University and Bavarian violins by Antonio Stradivari (1644-1737). The opening date of the installation, December 18, coincided with the 275th anniversary of the death of Antonio Stradivari.
The Salomé Chamber Orchestra, New York City’s electrifying new conductor-less string ensemble, was formed in September 2009. www.salomechamber.org
Tickets: $35
Special offer: Purchase single tickets for any two concerts and pay $30/ticket (valid on phone orders only: 212-570-3949)

Thursday, February 14, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
A Judy Collins Valentine
Folk legend Judy Collins makes her third Metropolitan Museum appearance with a Valentine’s Day-themed program on the day itself.
This concert is supported by the estate of Kathryn Walter Stein.
Judy Collins has thrilled audiences worldwide with her unique blend of interpretative folksongs and contemporary themes. Her impressive career has spanned more than 40 years. Her most recent recording, Bohemian, a collection of songs inspired by the 1960s music scene in Southern California, was released in 2011 on her own label, Wildflower Records.
Ticket holders are invited to enjoy a three-course dinner in the Members Dining Room, featuring classic food and wine pairings for $100 per person (both pre- and post-concert dinner seatings are available); call 212-570-3975. In addition, the Petrie Court Café and Wine Bar offers an elegant three-course prix-fixe menu paired with a glass of sparkling wine for $60 per person; call 212-570-3964.
www.judycollins.com
Tickets: $65

Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations
Endellion String Quartet
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Marsha Morton, Edmund Morris
February 15–24, 2013

* Bring the Kids to Beethoven!: $1 tickets for children (ages 7-16) when accompanied by an adult with a full-price ticket (subject to availability) to any Framing Beethoven event. For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212-570-3949, or visit the box office.
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven. Complementing the performances are talks by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edmund Morris on how Beethoven made art out of his disability, Metropolitan Museum art historian Kathryn Calley Galitz on the rise of Romanticism among Beethoven’s art contemporaries, and by art historian Marsha Morton on the context in which his music became central to theories of romanticism and the sublime.
The acclaimed Endellion String Quartet will make its first New York appearances since 1995 with these six concerts. The ensemble, in residence at Cambridge University, marked its 30th anniversary in 2009 with the release of a boxed set of the complete Beethoven string quartets on Warner Classics. Listen to the Endellion String Quartet playing Beethoven.
Of the recordings, which were also named a Gramophone Editor’s Choice of 2009, The Strad said, “The performances of the central canon of 17 quartets are the best overall from the past decade or so. ... The Endellion String Quartet...has steadily evolved from a neat and tidy group into something a little shaggier and far more penetrative, especially in Beethoven. All four players are remarkable artists and Andrew Watkinson is a leader of international stature.”
The Endellion String Quartet enters its 34th year in the 2012-13 season. In addition to the Beethoven set, the quartet’s 30th anniversary year was marked by new commissions of six ‘Quartettini’ from Robin Holloway and a new piece by Roxanna Panufnik and poet Wendy Cope; involvement in Phil Grabsky’s documentary film In Search of Beethoven; a DVD of performance of Beethoven works; a series of performances of Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ incorporating the Endellion’s commission of text from Andrew Motion especially for the piece; and concerts throughout the U.K., and in Europe, China, Japan, and Korea. The Endellion continues its residency (now in its 20th year) at the University of Cambridge, and was involved in special celebratory concerts at the university that recently celebrated its 800th anniversary. www.endellionquartet.com

Friday, February 15, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: “Setting the Stage: A Few Notes on Romantic Painting”
Kathryn Calley Galitz, Associate Museum Educator
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, complemented by related talks, including this one by Metropolitan Museum art historian Kathryn Calley Galitz.
The rise of Romanticism in the early 19th century signaled a rejection of Neoclassical ideals. Reason and order gave way to emotion and untamed nature, and the notion of the man of genius captured the popular imagination. This talk focuses on works by Beethoven’s contemporaries, including Delacroix and Friedrich, setting the stage for the Romantic revolution.
Tickets: $25
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, February 15, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 2; Op. 59, No. 3; and Op. 130 (with Beethoven’s alternative last movement).
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Saturday, February 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 6; Op. 18, No. 1; and Op. 132.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Sunday, February 17, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 4; Op. 74; and Op. 131.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Tuesday, February 19, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: “The Roar That Lies on the Other Side of Silence”
Edmund Morris

Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, complemented by related talks, including this one by Edmund Morris.
This lecture will be Sign Language interpreted.
Edmund Morris, the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of Theodore Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan, is also a classically trained pianist and the author of Beethoven: The Universal Composer. In this program, which will include audio clips and keyboard examples, Morris explores how a deaf genius made art out of his disability, and examines the ways in which many of Beethoven’s most exquisite—or sometimes frightening—sound effects may have arisen from his deafness.
Morris published This Living Hand and Other Essays, which includes his writings on Beethoven and other subjects, in October 2012.
Tickets: $25
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, February 22, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Beethoven: The Sights and Sounds of the Romantic Sublime
Marsha Morton, Professor, Pratt Institute
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, and related talks, including this one by Marsha Morton, professor of art history at Pratt Institute.
Beethoven began composing in the 1790s, when theories of romanticism and the sublime were being formulated in Germany. This talk will consider the context in which his music came to embody the dark drives, metaphysical essence, and “endless longing” (E.T.A. Hoffmann) that inspired generations of musicians, artists, and writers.
Tickets: $25
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, February 22, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 5; Op. 135; and Op. 59, No. 2.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Saturday, February 23, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This program features the Quartets Op. 18, No. 3; Op. 95; and Op. 127.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Sunday, February 24, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Framing Beethoven: Endellion String Quartet
Framing Beethoven: Concerts and Conversations, nine events over 10 days, centers on six concerts performed by England’s Endellion String Quartet of the complete string quartets of Beethoven.
This final program features the Quartets Op. 59, No. 1; and Op. 130 with Grosse Fuge.
This series is supported in part by the Grace Jarcho Ross and Daniel G. Ross Concert Fund.
Tickets: $40
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

***Saturday, March 9, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
Naseer Shamma and Al-Oyoun Ensemble
Naseer Shamma is one of Iraq’s leading cultural icons. He is a leader of the famed Iraqi oud school, a virtuosic approach to the instrument (an Arab lute) that began in the early 20th century, combining Turkish techniques and aesthetics with the melodies and spirit of traditional Iraqi maqam music. Both a composer and performer, Shamma has created an innovative approach to the oud, expanding its technical capabilities and influencing players across the Arab region. In his first performance in the U.S. in more than a decade, Shamma will appear with his Al-Oyoun Ensemble, seven virtuoso musicians from Cairo performing in a contemporary style of Shamma’s own creation, which he calls “Arab chamber music.” “His technical prowess is bewitching… it transforms listening into a mystical experience,” says Cairo’s Al-Ahram Weekly. “All it takes him is a properly tuned oud to lead you far into the depths of metaphysics, then back onto the political plane.”
This event is part of Iraq Now!, two events celebrating contemporary Iraqi culture presented in collaboration with Alwan for the Arts, that also includes a conversation with architect Zaha Hadid on Thursday, March 14.
Tickets: $25

Friday, March 15, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
Charles Lloyd New Quartet and Friends at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
With special guest Maria Farantouri and friends (Jason Moran, Reuben Rogers, Eric Harland, Sokratis Sinopoulos, Alicia Hall Moran)

Tenor saxophone titan Charles Lloyd has been hailed as one of the most restlessly inventive musicians in jazz history. His current quartet—with Jason Moran, piano; Reuben Rogers, bass; and Eric Harland, drums—was honored as the 2011 “#1 Acoustic Group” by the Jazz Times critics poll. “Follow the career of Charles Lloyd,” said The New York Times, “and you see a map of great jazz across half a century.”
In celebration of his 75th birthday—on the actual day—Charles Lloyd performs a program that marshals the creativity of his quartet, special guest singer Maria Farantouri, Sokratis Sinopoulos on lyra, and singer Alicia Hall Moran in music that ranges from Byzantine hymns to 21st-century jazz.
Revered in her native Greece, Farantouri was the legendary voice of resistance during the Greek military junta of the late 1960s, giving hope to millions through the banned protest songs of Mikis Theodorakis and earning widespread praise as the “soul of Greece.”
Tickets: $50

***New program Friday, March 22, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
Seven Words – World Premiere, MMA Commission
A music-video work featuring original live-mixed video installation by Ofri Cnaani
Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross
Performed by the Salzburg Chamber Soloists – New York Debut
Lavard Skou Larsen, Director

When Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross was first performed during the Good Friday service at the Spanish Cádiz Cathedral in 1786, the audience saw a multimedia performance that included special lighting, spoken words, and live music. Inspired by that original setting, the Met invited artist Ofri Cnaani to create a live video installation to encircle the performers and create a theatrical context for the music. Lavard Skou Larsen’s Salzburg Chamber Soloists will make their New York debut with a program featuring their adaptation of the piece, originally scored for string quartet, for a 15-member string orchestra.
Looking at the moment of crucifixion as a moment of extreme physicality, ecstasy, and final surrender, Cnaani worked with the Metropolitan’s prints and drawings collections as a source material for a nuanced, metaphorical, universal, and non-literal interpretation of Haydn’s work. The interaction between sound, word, and image underscores a dialogue that is both historical and contemporary.
Tickets: $45

Saturday, March 23, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
DJ Spooky – Of Water and Ice: A Concert of Compositions Based on Water and Arctic RhythmsWorld Premiere, MMA Commission
Of Water and Ice is a composition for string quartet and video that evolved from DJ Spooky’s large-scale multimedia work Sinfonia Antarctica. Of Water and Ice is a music/video exploration of the composition of ice and water, and our relationship to the vanishing environment of the arctic poles.
There are two related talks following this event: Art and the Environment on March 24, and DJ Spooky and Bill McKibben in Conversation: Climate Change on May 9.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $30

***Thursday, March 28, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Giulio Cesare: Met Meets Met – Appearance by David Daniels
Christopher Lightfoot, Curator, Department of Greek and Roman Art
With David McVicar and Robert Jones

In anticipation of the Metropolitan Opera’s new production of Handel’s Giulio Cesare, this second “Met Meets Met” collaboration explores the world of Julius Caesar. Metropolitan Museum curator Christopher Lightfoot discusses Caesar’s
sojourn in Egypt and the impact of Egyptian art on Rome, setting the stage for a conversation with celebrated director David McVicar and set designer Robert Jones. The creative duo will talk about audience conceptions of this historical era versus the reality and their approach to this new staging. Countertenor David Daniels, who stars as Caesar in the Met’s new production, will perform an excerpt from the opera.
Tickets: $25

Friday, March 29, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert
For the Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert’s 10th anniversary season, the ensemble’s artistic coordinator, cellist Edward Arron, has assembled three programs of the lively mix of repertoire that has elicited critical praise over the last decade. In this second program, Hyunah Yu, soprano; Jeewon Park, piano; Colin Jacobsen, violin; Nicholas Cords, viola; and Edward Arron, cello, perform Schnittke’s Musica Nostalgica for Cello and Piano (1992); the world premiere of a Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert commission, a work for string trio by Dmitry Yanov-Yanovsky; Shostakovich’s Seven Romances on Poems by Alexander Blok for Soprano and Piano Trio, Op. 127; and Beethoven’s Piano Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 16.
These concerts are generously supported by the Brodsky Family Foundation.
Tickets: $35
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, April 5, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
New York Philharmonic CONTACT!
CONTACT!, the New York Philharmonic’s new music series, is in its fourth season. In this second of two programs, Music Director Alan Gilbert conducts a program of recent European works. Principal Oboist Liang Wang is featured in the U.S. premiere of Poul Ruders’s Oboe Concerto (1998). Unsuk Chin’s Gougalon (2012) has its U.S. premiere performance, as does Yann Robin’s Backdraft (2012), a co-commission by the New York Philharmonic and the Fundacao Casa da Musica, Portugal. And Anders Hillborg’s Vaporized Tivoli (2010) has its New York premiere.
This series is made possible by the Xerox Foundation.
Tickets: $20
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, April 12, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Sau-Wing Lam Collection in Action: The Dark Arts of the Viola
In four concerts during the 2012-13 season, New York’s dynamic young Salomé Chamber Orchestra will present programs featuring members and guest artists performing on instruments from The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed
Instruments
, a selection of which will be on view in the Metropolitan Museum’s André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments through June 30, 2013.
These concerts are made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
In this program, violinist Philippe Quint joins Salomé co-founders Sean Avram Carpenter and violist David Aaron Carpenter in performances of works featuring viola: Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola, and String Orchestra, K. 364; Lera Auerbach’s Sogno di Stabat Mater for Violin, Viola, Vibraphone, and Orchestra (2008); and and Paganini’s Sonata per la Grand Viola et Orchestra Op. 35, featuring violist David Aaron Carpenter, violinist Philippe Quint (performing on the “Bavarian” Stradivari in the Mozart work), and violinist Sean Carpenter (performing on the “Baltic” Guarneri del Gesù of 1731).
Tickets: $35
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

***Saturday, April 27, 2013, at 8:00 p.m. in The Charles Engelhard Court
Dan Deacon in The Charles Engelhard CourtWorld Premiere, MMA Commission
Electronic composer and party instigator Dan Deacon performs in places ranging from the streets to the clubs to Carnegie Hall. His latest project, America, is a love letter and a call to action. In a New York Times profile, Deacon stated: “it’s impossible to think about the land without the history of it, and that’s a mixture of guilt and shame.” Deacon brings his fluorescent creativity to the Met Museum with a new music/video piece, specifically created for The Charles Engelhard Court in the Met’s American Wing. This once-in-a-lifetime performance, combining audience-triggered sound and light, video projection with live and electronic sounds, explores Dan’s commitment to civic responsibility through the lens of innovative multimedia performance. “If Dan Deacon comes your way, go…It will change your life forever,” says Bob Boilen of NPR Music. “Oh, and the music is insanely good.”
Tickets: $27 Unreserved seating

Saturday, May 4, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
The Sau-Wing Lam Collection in Action: The Virtuosic Violin
In four concerts during the 2012-13 season, New York’s dynamic young Salomé Chamber Orchestra will present programs featuring members and guest artists performing on instruments from The Sau-Wing Lam Collection of Rare Italian Stringed
Instruments
, a selection of which will be on view in the Metropolitan Museum’s André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments from December 18, 2012, through June 30, 2013.
These concerts are made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
In this program, works by Paganini, Saint-Saëns, Kreisler, and Sarasate will be performed by guest violinists Philippe Quint and Chee-Yun, with David Aaron Carpenter, viola.
Tickets: $35
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

Friday, May 10, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
This event will be live streamed on www.metmuseum.org/livestream
DJ Spooky – Civil War - World Premiere, MMA Commission
DJ Spooky creates a music-video piece for string ensemble with live-mixed electronic music and video using images from the exhibition Photography and the American Civil War, working in tandem with Jeff L. Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs. A related talk, Documenting War, takes place on May 21.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Photography and the American Civil War is on view April 2—September 2, 2013. The exhibition is made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
Tickets: $30

***Saturday, May 18, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. at The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
Liars in The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing
Breaking into the New York dance-punk scene in 2000, Liars have been hailed for music that retains a consistent interest in rhythm and sound texture even as its style shifts dramatically between albums. Their embrace of interdisciplinary multimedia makes them more than just a mere rock band—Liars’ music can’t be separated from the visuals that typically accompany each album. Their work consistently eludes expectations and sabotages casual interpretation, an approach that continues to produce works that defy categorization. In a review for BBC Music, John Doran called WIXIW, their sixth studio album, an “unqualified success.” For their Met Museum debut, Liars present a multimedia site-specific performance in The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing.
This event is presented in collaboration with Wordless Music.
This series is made possible in part by Isabel C. Iverson and Walter T. Iverson.
This event is in conjunction with PUNK: Chaos to Couture, on view from May 7 – August 14, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by Moda Operandi.
Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.
Tickets: $25 Unreserved seating

Friday, June 7, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert
For the Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert’s 10th anniversary season, the ensemble’s artistic coordinator, cellist Edward Arron, has assembled three programs of the lively mix of repertoire that has elicited critical praise over the last decade. To round out the season, Colin Jacobsen, violin; Nicholas Cords, viola; and Edward Arron, cello, perform a program of Biber’s Passacaglia in G Minor for Solo Violin; and a string trio arrangement by Dmitry Sitkovetsky of Bach’s Goldberg Variations.
These concerts are generously supported by the Brodsky Family Foundation.
Tickets: $35
Bring the Kids! $1 tickets available, see www.metmuseum.org/tickets

***Saturday, June 8, 2013, at 7:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
So Percussion & Man Forever
An evening of drumming by the celebrated ensemble So Percussion and composer/percussionist John Colpitts’s experimental drum project Man Forever. Called an “experimental powerhouse” by The Village Voice, So Percussion—America’s premier
modern percussion ensemble—brings their adventurous spirit to the Met Museum to explore the DIY and experimental components of punk. John Colpitts (aka Kid Millions) is a Brooklyn-based multi-instrumentalist, composer, and writer who is
perhaps best known as the drummer for Oneida. Man Forever is his vehicle for exploring the outer limits of drum experimentation and performance. Since 2010, Man Forever has released two full-length albums and two live recordings.
This event is presented in collaboration with Wordless Music.
This series is made possible in part by Isabel C. Iverson and Walter T. Iverson.
This event is in conjunction with PUNK: Chaos to Couture, on view from May 7 – August 11, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible by Moda Operandi.
Additional support is provided by Condé Nast.
Tickets: $25

Friday, June 21, 2013, at 9:30 p.m. in the Great Hall
iPad Mixing Piece
Paul D. Miller invites the audience to bring their iPhones and iPads and collectively mix a soundtrack for a listening party, using his iPhone/iPad app in the Museum’s Great Hall. This app has been downloaded by more than 250,000 users.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $30

Talks

Tuesday, February 12, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Lincoln Seen and Heard with Stephen Lang and Harold Holzer
On the 203rd anniversary of Lincoln’s birth, the Metropolitan Museum presents a special performance of “Lincoln Seen and Heard,” a program that has been performed at the White House, Ford’s Theatre, the George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton Presidential Libraries, and other venues. Actor Stephen Lang (Avatar, Terra Nova, A Few Good Men) reads the words of Lincoln as the Metropolitan Museum’s Harold Holzer, an award-winning Lincoln scholar, narrates and illustrates with Lincoln photographs. Lincoln was frequently photographed at precisely the time of his most important speeches, and this program combines his words and pictures to evoke the real Lincoln—from his days as prairie politician to the presidency and immortality.
Tickets: $30

Wednesday, February 13, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in Bonnie J. Sacerdote Hall
Matisse: In Search of True Painting
Rebecca Rabinow, Curator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
This event is part of the Met Salon Series, which offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments.

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is one of the most acclaimed masters of his generation. The critic
Clement Greenberg, writing in The Nation in 1949, called him a “self-assured master who can no more help painting well than breathing.” However, painting had rarely come easily to Matisse. Throughout his career, he questioned, repainted and reevaluated his work. Curator Rebecca Rabinow explains how Matisse used his completed canvases as tools, repeating compositions in order to compare effects, gauge his progress, and, as he put it, “push further and deeper into true painting.” While this manner of working with pairs, trios, and series is certainly not unique to Matisse, his need to progress methodically from one painting to the next is striking. For Matisse, the process of creation was not simply a means to an end but a dimension of his art that was as important as the finished canvas.
This talk is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Matisse: In Search of True Painting, on view December 4, 2012-March 17, 2013.
The exhibition is made possible in part by Vacheron Constantin.
Additional support is provided by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund and the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund.
The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in collaboration with the Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen, and the Centre Pompidou, Musée National d’Art Moderne, Paris.
The exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
Tickets: $27

***Friday, March 1, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Manet, Courbet, and Baudelaire: Art, the City, and the Birth of Modern Life
From La Vie Moderne to La Belle Epoque: Art and Society in Paris from 1853 to 1914 – the first of two talks (see March 8)

Jerrilynn Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
The period between the 1850s and World War I in Paris is known as time when intellectuals, artists, writers, and performers transformed the city physically, artistically, and socially. Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Marx, Marie Curie, Freud, Zola, and Baudelaire were all setting the stage for the modern world with new discoveries, new ideas, and new ways of looking at society and social relations. The resulting art and literature would scandalize, push against convention, humanize, and ultimately help to transform and shape the modern world.
Tickets: $30 (Series: $55)

***Wednesday, March 6, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Leonardo da Vinci: Singular and Plural
The first of two talks exploring the life and process of Leonardo da Vinci (see March 13)
Luke Syson, Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Curator in Charge, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts
Leonardo worked on a surprisingly small number of works—the Mona Lisa among them—refining and altering them over years. This method created a production bottleneck that could only be dealt with through delegating, leaving us with the problem of how we distinguish a fully autograph product from a painting made in the workshop. This lecture by Luke Syson (organizer of the blockbuster exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan at London’s National Gallery) explores artistic production, collaboration and delegation, and will track Leonardo’s personal journey from a solitary artist to a collaborator working with pupils, assistants, and peers, and back.
This series is made possible by the Giorgio S. Sacerdote Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $40)

***Friday, March 8, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
From Degas to Lautrec: The City and the Dark Side of Café Society
From La Vie Moderne to La Belle Epoque: Art and Society in Paris from 1853 to 1914 – the second of two talks (see March 1)

Jerrilynn Dodds, Dean, Sarah Lawrence College
The period between the 1850s and World War I in Paris is known as time when intellectuals, artists, writers, and performers transformed the city physically, artistically and socially. Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, Marx, Marie Curie, Freud, Zola, and Baudelaire were all setting the stage for the modern world with new discoveries, new ideas, and new ways of looking at society and social relations. The resulting art and literature would scandalize, push against convention, humanize, and ultimately help to transform and shape the modern world.
Tickets: $30 (Series: $55)

***Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Rethinking Leonardo in his Old Age
The second of two talks exploring the life and process of Leonardo da Vinci (see March 6)

Carmen Bambach, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints
The late years of Leonardo da Vinci have often been minimized in comparison to his achievements in Florence and Milan. This may be because it’s sometimes fashionable to consider an artist’s production in old age past its prime or merely a replication of earlier, more successfully received work. In this talk, Carmen Bambach (who organized the Met’s seminal 2003 exhibition Leonardo da Vinci, Master Draftsman) examines Leonardo’s later years and the riches of his interior life and his concrete, multi-faceted production as an artist-thinker. What lies at front and center in the work of Leonardo’s old age is the unfinished dimension of his thought and production.
This series is made possible by the Giorgio S. Sacerdote Fund.
Tickets: $25 (Series: $40)

***Thursday, March 14, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Zaha Hadid
In conversation with Sheila Canby, Patti Cadby Birch Curator in Charge of the Museum’s Department of Islamic Art, and Joseph Giovannini, architect
One of the foremost Iraqis of her generation—and an internationally celebrated architect—Ms. Hadid speaks about culture, transition, and architecture in the evolving global arena.
This event is part of Iraq Now!, two events celebrating contemporary Iraqi culture presented in collaboration with Alwan for the Arts, that also includes a concert by Naseer Shamma and Al-Oyoun Ensemble on Saturday, March 9.
Tickets: $35

***Tuesday, March 19, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
African-American Art, 1913 and 2013
Nell Irvin Painter, Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, Princeton University
Sarah Lewis, faculty, Yale University School of Art, and member, President Obama’s Arts Policy Committee
Introduced by Yaelle Biro, Assistant curator for African Art

The exhibition African Art, New York and the Avant-Garde highlights the arrival of African Art in New York and how this meeting of forces shaped and was shaped by the dawn of Modernism in the United States. Nell Painter, author of The History of White People, in conversation with Sarah Lewis, examines the legacy of this first interaction of white collectors and taste-makers with African art and African-American artists one hundred years ago—and reveals how this hidden history is an essential backdrop for understanding key cultural, social and political aspects of race in America yesterday and today.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde, on view through April 14, 2013.
This exhibition is made possible by the Friends of the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.
Tickets: $25

Sunday, March 24, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Art and the Environment
DJ Spooky, Artist in Residence
Join Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky as he shares his experiences from the North and South Poles in a conversation with Museum curators and visual artists about art and the environment as reflected in American culture. Presented in conjunction with the performance of Of Water and Ice on March 23, this program offers an opportunity to learn about the permanent collection through discussions and presentations.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Free with Museum admission. Reservations and tickets are not required.

***Wednesday, March 27, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
The Art and Science Dating Game
How Artists and Scientists Find Each Other... and What Happens Next?

DJ Spooky, Artist in Residence
This event is part of the Met Salon Series, which offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments.
The potency of collaborations between artists and scientists is undeniable. But how do these
collaborations actually work? How do artists and scientists find each other outside of their labs and studios? How do they turn their mutual interests in environment and climate change into sustained relationships? Join artist, producer, and activist Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky for an informal conversation about partnerships between artists and scientists, and the new work, new research, and new thinking that can emerge from innovative trans-disciplinary collaborations. Participants will include pairs of artists and scientists from the PositiveFeedback consortium of Columbia University, New York University, and the City University of New York. Audience members are encouraged to mingle with panelists following the presentation.
This presentation is co-produced by PositiveFeedback, an initiative of The Earth Institute, Columbia University; Center for Creative Research, NYU; and the CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities, designed specifically to support the research collaborations of artists and scientists focused on climate change.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $27

***Wednesday, April 10, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Geraldine Brooks and Tony Horwitz: A Civil War Dialogue
Moderator: Bill Goldstein, book critic of NBC’s Weekend Today in New York
The novelist Geraldine Brooks and the historian Tony Horwitz have both written about the Civil War—and are married to one another. Join them as they discuss their work, including her novel March and his Confederates in the Attic and Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid that Sparked the Civil War, and how as husband and wife, historian and historical novelist, they have approached the Civil War—and the writing of history—with different aims, styles, concerns, and conclusions.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Photography and the American Civil War, on view April 2—September 2, 2013. The exhibition is made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
Tickets: $25

***Thursday, April 11, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Documenting War Today: Sebastian Junger
Sebastian Junger, author of The Perfect Storm and War, is one of America’s most acclaimed writers and filmmakers. He collaborated with the award-winning photojournalist Tim Hetherington (who was later killed on assignment in Libya) on the Oscar-nominated documentary Restrepo, which chronicled the deployment of a platoon of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley. Mr. Junger will talk about documenting and photographing today’s battlefield, and about how the camera—both video and still—create the narrative of war today. He will offer his personal perspective on how the photographer, the reporter, and the filmmaker face and record the brutality and violence of war, risk their lives to do so, and sometimes die in battle alongside the soldiers and civilians whose experiences they are covering.
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Photography and the American Civil War, on view April 2—September 2, 2013. The exhibition is made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
Tickets: $25

***Tuesday, April 23, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Not Only Photoshop: Manipulating the “News,” and How to Prevent It
Margaret Sullivan, Public Editor of The New York Times
The Met exhibition After Photoshop: Manipulated Photography in the Digital Age showcases various ways in which artists have used digital technology to manipulate the photographic image over the past 20 years. Join Margaret Sullivan to examine the risks and dangers of manipulation of fact facing journalism today in the era of digital and social media. How can the news organizations of today—and the future—remain fast, accurate, and authoritative in a social media world changing the very definition and shape of journalism and news? And what are the larger repercussions for public debate on today’s essential political and social questions when the pace and accuracy (or inaccuracy) of social media pose ever-shifting challenges to civic life?
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition After Photoshop: Manipulated Photography in the Digital Age, on view through May 27, 2013.
Tickets: $25

***Wednesday, April 24, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
From Canvas to Costume: Painting at the Intersection of Theater and Film
Tim Gunn, Janie Bryant, Julie Taymor, and Catherine Zuber
Tim Gunn, fashion consultant and TV personality, and a stellar panel of today’s most visionary and influential costume designers explore the ways in which painting and other visual arts of the past and the present serve as an enduring inspiration in their work for stage, screen and television. Join Emmy Award-winner Janie Bryant (Deadwood and Mad Men), Tony Award-winning director and designer Julie Taymor (The Lion King, Across the Universe, The Tempest); and Catherine Zuber, five-time Tony Award-winner (South Pacific, The Light in the Piazza) as they discuss how the visual arts of the past—and the collections of the Met itself—shape their own art and serve as touchstone and context for understanding their achievements in costuming in a variety of media.
Tickets: $35

***Wednesday, May 8, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Hall
Georgia O’Keeffe: New Mexico/New Subjects
Lisa Messinger, Associate Curator, Department of Modern and Contemporary Art
This event is part of the Met Salon Series, which offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments.

See the American Southwest through the eyes of painter Georgia O’Keeffe as she first encounters it in 1929 and then immortalizes the relics and landscapes around her New Mexico homes into American icons in the 1930s and ’40s.
Tickets: $27

***Tuesday, May 9, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
DJ Spooky and Bill McKibben in Conversation: Climate Change
Following up on DJ Spooky’s multimedia work Of Water and Ice, presented on March 23, Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky will be joining author, educator, and environmentalist Bill McKibben in a conversation about climate change and its effect on our planet, our environment and our culture. The panelists share a deep concern for the environment, and both marshal their creativity and energy towards ongoing efforts to effect positive and sustainable change.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Tickets: $25

***Wednesday, May 15, 2013, at 2:30 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Tulips Beyond Holland: Inspirations from Flowers in Islamic Art
A Lecture Demonstration
Remco Van Vliet, third generation Dutch Master Florist
Navina Najat Haidar, Curator, Department of Islamic Art

Floral forms, whether appearing on scrolling arabesques or enclosed in cusped arches, are among the most enchanting aspects of the art of the Islamic world. The Islamic ideal of paradise conceived of as a garden lies at the root of much of the floral imagery. Historical engagement with medicinal plants; the development of scents and other related products; the response to the natural environment and exchanges with other cultures are also reflected in the development of styles of floral decoration or motifs in Islamic art and architecture. Remco Van Vliet, third-generation Dutch Master Florist will create arrangements with fresh flowers inspired by plants and compositions in the art of the Arab world, Turkey, Iran, and India.
Tickets: $25, $30, $45

***Wednesday, May 15, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Plain or Fancy, Restraint and Exuberance: A Conversation about Taste
Wayne Koestenbaum, author, The Queen’s Throat, Humiliation
Luke Syson, Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Curator in Charge, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts
The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Plain or Fancy? Restraint and Exuberance in the Decorative Arts culls highlights from the Met’s permanent collections to contrast restrained—plain—works of art with richly ornamented—fancy—ones, focusing on those moments in history when pendulum shifts made a sharp swing in one direction or another. Wayne Koestenbaum, one of today’s most influential and controversial cultural critics, joins Luke Syson for a conversation exploring the ways in which stylistic choices may also be moral ones—and how our aesthetic responses are shaped by shame and judgment. Do you like your art “plain” or “fancy”? And what does taste mean, really?
This event is in conjunction with the exhibition Plain or Fancy? Restraint and Exuberance in the Decorative Arts, on view from February 26–August 18, 2013.
Tickets: $25

***Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall
Documenting War
Jeff L. Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs
DJ Spooky, Artist in Residence
Susan Meiselas, photographer
This event is part of the Met Salon Series, which offers opportunities to engage with Met curators, artists, and guests in an informal setting, over coffee and light refreshments.

Jeff Rosenheim leads a conversation with DJ Spooky and acclaimed photographer and filmmaker Susan Meiselas, who gained international acclaim through her coverage of the insurrection in Nicaragua and her documentation of human rights issues in Latin America. Reflecting on the exhibition Photography and the American Civil War, the panel will explore issues of documentation, creation of history, narrative, and the role of the artist at the intersection between art and war.
This event complements DJ Spooky’s latest commission for the Met Museum, a new music/video work (see May 10) inspired by the exhibition.
This event is part of The Met Reframed: DJ Spooky in Residence, a Metropolitan Museum artist residency that in the 2012-13 season features Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky.
The Met Reframed is made possible by Marianna Sackler.
Photography and the American Civil War is on view April 2–September 2, 2013. The exhibition is made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
Tickets: $27

***Wednesday, May 22, 2013, at 6:00 p.m. in The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium
Glittering Images: An Evening with Camille Paglia
In conversation with Carrie Rebora Barratt, Associate Director for Collections and Administration
Camille Paglia, the renowned cultural critic whose audacious and ground-breaking Sexual Personae is one of the most highly praised and controversial works of recent art history, comes to the Met to discuss her newest book, Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars, and to examine the role museums—essential guardians of the centrality of art to contemporary life—play in an America where awareness of the fine arts may be receding, as she puts it, “drastically and tragically in ways that people who live in cities with great museums don’t realize.”
Tickets: $30

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February 5, 2013

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