Art/ Collection/ Collection/ Art Object

Collar

Date:
1900–1901
Culture:
American
Medium:
linen
Credit Line:
Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of the Brooklyn Museum, 2009; Gift of Mrs. Maurice Volpe, 1956
Accession Number:
2009.300.3560a, b
Not on view
This is an excellent example of the extreme height and stiffness of the early 20th-century detachable collar. The stiffness was created by multiple layers of linen and is the utmost example of how style prevailed over comfort. In this period shirts were made without collars or cuffs to facilitate laundering and to allow the wearer to change the detachable collars and cuffs as they were soiled. A crisp clean collar was essential as a sign of gentility and the detachable aspect made that readily accessible for men who could afford them. This particular style, without any sort of turn down or wing, would have been worn for very formal occasions. This collar, called "The Dudley" by the manufacturer, emphasizes the social ideals represented and by extension, the status of the wearer. This type of stiff detachable collar went out of fashion by the end of World War I.
Marking: Printed: "The Dudley/3x 15 1/2/ Extra Quality. Four Fold."
Inscribed in Ink: "E. Marcuson"
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