Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Glass jug

Period:
Imperial, Flavian or Trajanic
Date:
mid-1st–early 2nd century A.D.
Culture:
Roman
Medium:
Glass; blown in a dip mold
Dimensions:
H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm)
Classification:
Glass
Credit Line:
Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1881
Accession Number:
81.10.187
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 168
Translucent blue green; handle in same color.
Solid rim, folded out, down, round, and in, with beveled upper surface forming sloping collar; tall, cylindrical neck, with slight horizontal indent at base; bell-shaped body with side flaring to hollow, slightly bulging flange, then tapering sharply in; hollow, outsplayed base ring; pushed-in bottom; strap handle with single central rib that has a long, downward notched trail that extends down side, applied to top of body, drawn up and outwards in a straight line, then turned in and down, and trailed off on top of neck and underside of rim.
On body, nineteen vertical ribs from flange to neck, and partially extending with a twist on to lower neck.
Intact, but internal cracks across bottom; pinprick and elongated bubbles in neck and handle; slight dulling, faint iridescence, and small patches of weathering.

This vessel belongs to a very distinctive group of attractive, tall-necked jugs that were probably made at Colonia Agrippina (modern Cologne) on the River Rhine in Germany. Examples have been found exclusively in the northwestern provinces of the Roman Empire. This jug is said to come from Samarobriva (modern Amiens, France).
Said to be from Amiens, France (Froehner 1879, p. 139, pl. XVI, 84).

Until 1881, collection of Jules Charvet, Le Pecq, Île-de-France; 1881, purchased from J. Charvet by Henry G. Marquand; acquired in 1881, gift of Henry G. Marquand.
Froehner, Wilhelm. 1879. La verrerie antique: déscription de la Collection Charvet. no. 7, pp. 73, 78, 112-3, 139, pl. XVI, 84, Le Pecq: Jules Charvet.

Metropolitan Museum of Art. 1881. Twelfth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Association for eight months ending December 31, 1881. pp. 215-6, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Richter, Gisela M. A. 1911. "The Room of Ancient Glass." Bulletin of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 6(6) Supplement: pp. 19-20, fig. 24.

Smith, Ray Winfield. 1949. "The Significance of Roman Glass." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 8(2): p. 51.

Harden, Donald Benjamin and Grace Crowfoot. 1956. "Glass and Glazes." A History of Technology: The Mediterranean Civilizations and the Middle Ages, c. 700 B.C. to c. A.D. 1500, Vol. 2, Charles Singer, Eric John Holmyard, Alfred Rupert Hall, and Trevor Williams, eds. p. 340, fig. 318, Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Fremersdorf, Fritz. 1958. Die Denkmäler des römischen Köln. Bd. 3 Römisches Buntglas in Köln., Die Denkmäler des römischen Köln, Bd. 3. p. 33, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter & Co.

Fremersdorf, Fritz. 1958. Die Denkmäler des römischen Köln: herausgegeben von der Archäologischen Gesellschaft und dem Römisch-Germanischen Museum Köln. Bd. 4: Das naturfarbene sogenannte blaugrüne Glas in Köln, Bd. 4. p. 23, Berlin: Archäologischen Gesellschaft und dem Römisch-Germanischen Museum Köln.

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