Art/ Collection/ Art Object
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Terracotta bell-krater (mixing bowl)

Attributed to Asteas
Period:
Late Classical
Date:
ca. 360–350 B.C.
Culture:
Greek, South Italian, Paestan
Medium:
Terracotta; red-figure
Dimensions:
H. 14 5/8 in. (37.1 cm)
Classification:
Vases
Credit Line:
Rogers Fund, 1962
Accession Number:
62.11.3
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 161
Obverse, Dionysos and satyr. Reverse, two youths

Asteas was the leading painter of Paestan vases, with a considerable production and workshop. This early work depicts the wine-god Dionysos and a satyr who precedes him holding a kantharos (drinking cup) and a torch, now mostly lost. The satyr is human except for his ears, and the whole composition distantly echoes that of the famous statue group of the Tyrannicides.
von Bothmer, Dietrich. 1962. "Painted Greek Vases." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 21(1): pp. 10-1, fig. 13.

von Bothmer, Dietrich. 1972. Greek Vase Painting: An Introduction. no. 32, pp. 63, 71, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Mayo, Margaret Ellen and Kenneth Hamma. 1982. The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia no. 104, p. 228, Richmond: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Trendall, Arthur Dale. 1987. The Red-Figured Vases of Paestum. no. 59, p. 73, pl. 30a, b, Rome: British School at Rome.

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