Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Jérusalem, Chemin de Naplouse

Artist:
Auguste Salzmann (French, 1824–1872)
Printer:
Imprimerie photographique de Blanquart-Évrard, à Lille (French, active 1851–55)
Date:
1854
Medium:
Salted paper print from paper negative
Dimensions:
Image: 23.1 x 33 cm (9 1/8 x 13 in.) Mount: 44.8 x 59.5 cm (17 5/8 x 23 7/16 in.)
Classification:
Photographs
Credit Line:
Gilman Collection, Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation, 2005
Accession Number:
2005.100.373.171
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 852
Centrally placed olive trees stretch toward a vacated sky, while rocky terrain leads to a stone wall that marks the split between heaven and earth. This picturesque landscape recalls Salzmann’s earlier endeavors as a painter; throughout the late 1840s and early 1850s, he exhibited idyllic views of Italy and France at the official Salons. He had been influenced by the Barbizon School, a group of artists dedicated to elevating the genre of landscape painting in France. Here, he also references his photographic instructor, the eminent artist Gustave Le Gray (1820–1884), who promoted the paper negative process in France and created striking compositions of single beech and oak trees in the Fontainebleau Forest just outside Paris.
Inscription: Inscribed in negative then gone over in pencil, recto BL: "141"; printed on mount, recto BC: "Aug. Salzmann // JÉRUSALEM // CHEMIN DE NAPLOUSE // Gide et J. Baudry, éditeurs. // Imp. Photogr. de Blanquart - Evrard, à Lille."; inscribed in pencil on mount, recto TR: "171"; inscribed in pencil on mount, verso TR: "8.30 G"
André Jammes Collection; [Graphics International, Ltd.]; Gilman Paper Company Collection, New York, October 7, 1978

Perez, Nissan. "An Artist in Jerusalem: Auguste Salzmann." The Israel Museum Journal 1 (Spring 1982). pp. 19–50.



In 1854, Auguste Salzmann created approximately two hundred paper negatives during a four-month sojourn in Jerusalem. He recorded sixty-eight sites and categorized them, with some exceptions, by monotheistic religion—Judaism, Christianity, or Islam. Many of the resulting salted paper prints were circulated privately soon after his return to Paris. In 1856, the album, Jerusalem: A Study and Photographic Reproduction of the Holy City, was first advertised as a commercial endeavor for a wider public. Photographic plates were distributed three at a time over fifty-eight installments from September 1856 through 1859. All of Salzmann’s Jerusalem photographs were printed by the preeminent Blanquart-Évrard firm of Lille, France, while their distribution was managed by Gide et Baudry of Paris. Each album was meant to include two volumes of photographic plates accompanied by an archaeological treatise authored by Salzmann. The album in The Met collection is complete with 174 unbound photographic plates.
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