Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Dish

Date:
1750–75
Geography:
Made in West Yorkshire, Leeds, England
Culture:
British
Medium:
Earthenware
Dimensions:
H. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm); Diam. 6 in. (15.2 cm)
Classification:
Ceramics
Credit Line:
Gift of Col. G. Creighton Webb, 1936
Accession Number:
36.22.38
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 774
Creamware, so-called for its cream-colored body, is a refined earthenware with a lead-based glaze that was developed in Staffordshire, England around 1750. Due to its light color and glossy glaze, it was ideal for dinnerware. Economically affordable to produce, creamware was imported to America in large quantities. Although much creamware was used in America, it is rare to find pieces associated with a particular family. This dinner service (36.22.1 -.38) bears the initials “SBW” for Samuel Blachley Webb. The set was imported from England in 1774 by Webb, who was an aide-de-camp and military secretary to General George Washington.
Colonel G. Creighton Webb, New York, until 1936
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