Art/ Collection/ Collection/ Art Object

A Lady Playing the Tanpura

Date:
ca. 1735
Culture:
India (Rajasthan, Kishangarh)
Medium:
Ink, opaque and transparent watercolor, and gold on paper
Dimensions:
18 1/2 x 13 1/4 in. (47 x 33.7 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Fletcher Fund, 1996
Accession Number:
1996.100.1
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 251
As a nayika (archetypal heroine), this figure personifies the ideal of feminine beauty as conceptualized in Indian devotional poetry of the period. She strums a tanpura and wears elaborate jewelry and sheer textiles, clearly placing her as a member of the court. At the same time, there is the allusion that she is Radha, the divine consort of Krishna, who was important to these Kishangarh patrons.
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