Art/ Collection/ Collection/ Art Object
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Vase with Dragon amid Clouds

Period:
Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Yongzheng mark and period (1723–35)
Date:
early 18th century
Culture:
China
Medium:
Porcelain painted with copper red under transparent glaze (Jingdezhen ware)
Dimensions:
H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm)
Classification:
Ceramics
Credit Line:
The Friedsam Collection, Bequest of Michael Friedsam, 1931
Accession Number:
32.100.434
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 202
Arguably the most well-known motif in Chinese art, the dragon is a multivalent symbol imbued with many layers of meaning, including protection, happiness, and fertility. In early Chinese art the dragon was understood as a symbol of the cardinal direction east, and it has long been associated with water, particularly lakes and rivers. The dragon also signifies imperial rule, and works decorated with five-clawed dragons are known to have been produced for use at court.
Marking: Yongzheng markKangxi mark (six letters on bottom in underglaze blue)
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