Art/ Collection/ Art Object

砂糖黍文徳利
Bottle with Sugar Cane

Artist:
Hamada Shōji (Japanese, 1894–1978)
Period:
Shōwa period (1926–89)
Date:
ca. 1960
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Stoneware with painted decoration on iron-oxide glaze
Dimensions:
H. 8 in. (20.3 cm)
Classification:
Ceramics
Credit Line:
Purchase, Rogers Fund and Richard and Peggy Danziger and Anonymous Gifts, 1994
Accession Number:
1994.289
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 202
Hamada was one of the most influential ceramicists of the folk art, or mingei, tradition in Japan, which extolled the innate expressiveness of earlier work by anonymous craftsmen. This bottle represents the artist’s distinctive style—a synthesis of influences from varied sources. Hamada was a close friend of the British studio potter Bernard Leach and briefly worked with him in Cornwall.
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Graceful Gestures: A Decade of Collecting Japanese Art," September 29, 2001–March 10, 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sense of Place: Landscape in Japanese Art," May 8, 2002–September 8, 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Studies in Global Ceramic History," 2015.

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