Art/ Collection/ Art Object
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琴棋書画図屏風
The Four Accomplishments

Artist:
Kano Motonobu (Japanese, 1477–1559)
Period:
Muromachi period (1392–1573)
Date:
mid-16th century
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Pair of six-panel folding screens; ink and color on paper
Dimensions:
Image (each screen): 67 x 150 in. (170.2 x 381 cm)
Classification:
Screens
Credit Line:
Dr. and Mrs. Roger G. Gerry Collection, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Roger G. Gerry, 1991
Accession Number:
1991.480.1, .2
Not on view
Within a dramatic landscape of towering pines, distant peaks, and roaring waterfalls, are four scenes of human activity, each of which alludes to one of the four pursuits appropriate for a Chinese gentleman: music, the board game Go, calligraphy, and painting. At far right, a scholar is accompanied by a servant carrying his zither (qin). They move toward a riverbank upon which three gentlemen are absorbed in a game of Go. In the left screen, two boys carrying bundles of books and scrolls follow a hatted gentlemen headed toward a thatched pavilion. Inside, three servants have unrolled a painted hanging scroll for their master, who stands at the parapet gazing at a waterfall. Moving right to left through the screens, we find that we have also traveled temporally, from the barren plum branches of early spring, through a hazy summer, geese alighting on a sandbank in autumn, and finally to the snow-covered rocks of winter.
Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art. "Great Masters of the Kano School," April 22, 1989–May 21, 1989.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Tea Ceremony Wares of Mino: Shino and Oribe," 1992.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Immortals and Sages: Fusuma Paintings from Ryoan-Ji and the Lore of China in Japanese Art," 1993.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "No Ordinary Mortals: The Human and Not-So-Human Figure in Japanese Art," 1996.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Resonant Image: Tradition in Japanese Art (Part One)," 1997–98.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," 1998.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Blossoms of Many Colors: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Japanese Art," March 21, 2000–August 9, 2000.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Graceful Gestures: A Decade of Collecting Japanese Art," September 29, 2001–March 10, 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Written Image: Japanese Calligraphy and Paintings from the Sylvan Barnet and William Burto Collection," October 1, 2002–March 2, 2003.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Mighty Kano School: Orthodoxy and Iconoclasm," December 18, 2004–June 5, 2005.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sensitivity to the Seasons: Autumn and Winter," June 22, 2006–September 10, 2006.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Graceful Gestures: Two Decades of Collecting Japanese Art," 2007.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Drama of Eyes and Hands: Sharaku's Portraits of Kabuki Actors," September 20, 2007–March 24, 2008.

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