Art/ Collection/ Art Object

愛染明王像
Aizen Myōō

Period:
Nanbokuchō period (1336–92)
Date:
14th century
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Hanging scroll; ink, color, gold, and cut gold leaf on silk
Dimensions:
53 5/16 x 32 7/16 in. (135.4 x 82.4 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Purchase, Mary Griggs Burke Gift, 1966
Accession Number:
66.90
Not on view
The blood-red body and flaming halo of Aizen Myōō, the Wisdom King of Passion, symbolize how, in Buddhist practice, the violent energies of carnality and desire can be converted in the pursuit of enlightenment. Aizen Myōō is the embodiment of rage: his hair stands on end, a snarling lion rises from his head, and his six arms brandish Esoteric Buddhist weapons and other emblems of power. The bow and arrow in his middle hands are attributes appropriated from Kama, the Hindu god of love. In contrast to this righteous anger, jewels of good fortune forming flaming clusters spill from a vase in front of the deity’s lotus throne. While Aizen Myōō’s appearance may instill fear, the faithful afflicted with problems of the heart address him as a popular intercessor.
#8808. Aizen Myōō (Râgarâja)
: / 
For Audio Guide tours and information, visit metmuseum.org/audioguide.
Marking: Seal: on reverse, Japanese characters in red
Mary Griggs Burke , New York (until at least 1965) ; [ Setsu Gatōdō Co. Ltd. , Tokyo, until 1966; sold to MMA]
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Masterpieces of Fifty Centuries," November 14, 1970–June 1, 1971.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Patterns of Collecting: Selected Acquisitions 1965–1975," December 6, 1975–March 23, 1976.

New York. Asia Society. "Journey of the Three Jewels: Japanese Buddhist Paintings from Western Collections".

New York. Asia House Gallery. "Masterworks of Japanese Buddhist Paintings from Western Collections," October 11, 1979–December 9, 1979.

Denver Art Museum. "Masterworks of Japanese Buddhist Paintings from Western Collections," March 27, 1980–May 11, 1980.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "No Ordinary Mortals: The Human and Not-So-Human Figure in Japanese Art," 1996.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," 1998.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Blossoms of Many Colors: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Japanese Art," March 21, 2000–August 9, 2000.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Mighty Kano School: Orthodoxy and Iconoclasm," December 18, 2004–June 5, 2005.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sensitivity to the Seasons: Autumn and Winter," June 22, 2006–September 10, 2006.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Animals, Birds, Insects, and Marine Life in Japanese Art," June 26, 2008–November 30, 2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Japanese Mandalas: Emanations and Avatars," June 18, 2009–November 30, 2009.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Celebrating the Arts of Japan: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," October 20, 2015–January 22, 2017.

Related Objects

Fujiwara no Kamatari as a Shinto Deity

Date: after 1350 Medium: Hanging scroll; color on silk Accession: 1985.16 On view in:Not on view

Portrait of Shun'oku Myōha

Date: ca. 1383 Medium: Hanging scroll; ink, color, and gold on silk Accession: 2007.329 On view in:Not on view

Emperor Xuanzong's Flight to Shu

Date: mid-12th century Medium: Hanging scroll; ink, color, and gold on silk Accession: 41.138 On view in:Not on view

Portrait of Xuanzang (Genjō) with Attendant

Artist: In the Style of Kasuga Motomitsu (Japanese, active early 11th century) Date: 14th century Medium: Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk Accession: 29.160.29 On view in:Gallery 224

Cicada on a Grapevine

Artist: Bokurin Guan (Japanese, active late 14th century) Date: late 14th century Medium: Hanging scroll; ink on paper Accession: 2015.300.58 On view in:Not on view