Art/ Collection/ Art Object
{{img.publicCaption}}

Saint Roch

Date:
early 16th century
Geography:
Made in Normandy, France
Culture:
French
Medium:
Oak, paint, gilt
Dimensions:
62 1/4 × 20 1/2 × 13 3/4 in., 140 lb. (158.1 × 52.1 × 34.9 cm, 63.5 kg)
Classification:
Sculpture-Wood
Credit Line:
The Cloisters Collection, 1925
Accession Number:
25.120.239a, b
On view at The Met Cloisters in Gallery 20
Saint Roch’s celebrity derives from his reputation for curing victims of plague, having himself been miraculously cured of the disease. His representation here is in keeping with his legend: the wealthy native of Montpellier wears clothing that is richly colored and patterned with gold, and also the broad-brimmed hat of a religious pilgrim en route to Rome (symbolized by the crossed keys). On his thigh is a bulbous open sore indicative of plague. At his side is the loyal dog that helped nurse the saint back to health by bringing him bread and licking his sores. The saint once held a walking stick.
Saint Roch’s fame endured well beyond the first outbreak of plague in the mid-fourteenth century. Indeed, the elaborately painted costume and accurately rendered anatomy of this image herald the Renaissance.
Inscription: (on base): ROCH
George Grey Barnard American, Bellefonte, Pennsylvania 1863–1938 New York, New York (until 1925)
Breck, Joseph. The Cloisters: A Brief Guide. 1st ed. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1926. p. 34.

Rorimer, James J. "A Pilgrim Saint." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 24, no. 4 (April 1929). pp. 103-4.

Breck, Joseph. The Cloisters: A Brief Guide. 4th ed. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1931. p. 34.

Rorimer, James J., and Margaret B. Freeman. The Cloisters: The Building and the Collection of Mediaeval Art, in Fort Tryon Park. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1938. p. 113.

Rorimer, James J. The Cloisters: The Building and the Collection of Medieval Art in Fort Tryon Park. 3rd revised ed. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1963. p. 202.

Schrader, J. L. "George Grey Barnard: The Cloisters and the Abbaye." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, n.s., 37, no. 1 (Summer 1979). p. 45, fig. 57.

Wixom, William D. "Medieval Sculpture at The Cloisters." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, n.s., 46, no. 3 (Winter 1988-1989). p. 55.

Norris, Michael. Medieval Art: A Resource for Educators. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2005. no. 35, pp. 138-39.

Husband, Timothy B. "Creating the Cloisters." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, n.s., 70, no. 4 (Spring 2013). p. 13, fig. 19.

Kargère, Lucretia Goddard, and Michele D. Marincola. "Conservation in Context: The Examination and Treatment of Medieval Polychrome Wood Sculpture in the United States." Metropolitan Museum Studies in Art, Science, and Technology 2 (2014). p. 38, n. 56.



Related Objects

Panel with Christ and the Woman of Samarra

Date: early 16th century Medium: Oak Accession: 50.147.20 On view in:Gallery 13

Panel with the Annunciation to the Shepherds

Date: early 16th century Medium: Oak Accession: 50.147.11 On view in:Gallery 13

Panel with the Presentation in the Temple

Date: early 16th century Medium: Oak Accession: 50.147.13 On view in:Gallery 13

Panel with the Visitation

Date: early 16th century Medium: Oak Accession: 50.147.9 On view in:Gallery 13

Panel with the Massacre of the Innocents

Date: early 16th century Medium: Oak Accession: 50.147.14 On view in:Gallery 13