Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Tables for Ladies

Artist:
Edward Hopper (American, Nyack, New York 1882–1967 New York)
Date:
1930
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
48 1/4 x 60 1/4 in. (122.6 x 153 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
George A. Hearn Fund, 1931
Accession Number:
31.62
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 903
In Hopper’s Tables for Ladies, a waitress leans forward to adjust the vividly painted foods at the window as a couple sits quietly in the richly paneled and well-lit interior. A cashier attentively tends to business at her register. Though they appear weary and detached, these two women hold posts newly available to female city dwellers outside the home. The painting’s title alludes to a recent social innovation in which establishments advertised "tables for ladies" in order to welcome their newly mobile female customers, who, if seen dining alone in public previously, were assumed to be prostitutes.
Inscription: Signed (lower right): EDWARD HOPPER
[Frank K. M. Rehn Gallery, New York, 1930–31; sold to MMA]

Pittsburgh, Pa. Carnegie Museum of Art. "Edward Hopper: An Exhibition of Paintings, Water Colors and Etchings," March 11–April 25, 1937, no. 2.

Boston. Institute of Modern Art. "Ten Americans," October 20–November 21, 1943, no. 10.

New York. Whitney Museum of American Art. "Edward Hopper Retrospective Exhibition," February 11–March 26, 1950, no. 37.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. "Edward Hopper Retrospective Exhibition," April 13–May 14, 1950, no. 37.

Detroit Institute of Arts. "Edward Hopper Retrospective Exhibition," June 4–July 2, 1950, no. 37.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Three Centuries of American Painting," April 9–October 17, 1965, unnum. checklist.

National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. "Great American Paintings from the Boston and Metropolitan Museums," November 30, 1970–January 10, 1971, no. 83.

Saint Louis, Mo. City Art Museum. "Great American Paintings from the Boston and Metropolitan Museums," January 28–March 7, 1971, no. 83.

Seattle Art Museum. "Great American Paintings from the Boston and Metropolitan Museums," March 25–May 9, 1971, no. 83.

Maine. William A. Farnsworth Library and Art Museum. "Edward Hopper 1882–1967: Oils, Watercolors, Etchings," July 9–September 15, 1971, no. 32.

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. "Edward Hopper 1882–1967: Oils, Watercolors, Etchings," September 22–October 31, 1971, no. 32.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Selection One," February 1–April 30, 1985, no catalogue.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "14 Americans," July 16, 1990–January 2, 1991, unnum. checklist.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. "Edward Hopper," May 6–August 19, 2007, no. 102.

National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. "Edward Hopper," September 16, 2007–January 21, 2008, no. 102.

Art Institute of Chicago. "Edward Hopper," February 16–May 11, 2008, no. 102.

Nina Ffrench-Frazier. "New York's Winterset: Edward Hopper." Art International 24 (January-February 1981), p. 129, compares this work to Manet's "Bar at the Folies Bergeres" and praises it as one of Hopper's "gentler, more convivial restaurant scenes".

T. C. Linn, Jr. "Activities in the Field of Art Here and Overseas." New York Times (July 19 1931), ill. p. X5.

William B. McCormick. "Tables for Ladies." New York American (July 17, 1931), p. 28, admires the way this work represents American life and praises the museum for acquiring it.

"Will Metropolitan Now Buy Modern Art?" Art Digest 5 (August 1, 1931), p. 13, ill., postulates that this museum's acquisition of this work may demonstrate a move away from its characteristic "ultra-conservativism" towards being more "contemporary in spirit".

"List of Accessions and Loans." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 26 (July 1931), p. 178.

"Recent Museum Acquisitions." Parnassus 3 (November 1931), p. 29.

"Modern Shuns Honor by Design Academy." New York Times (March 26, 1932), p. 15, notes that the MMA had shown little interest in modern art before buying this work.

"Hopper to Decline?" Art Digest 6 (April 1, 1932), p. 4.

"Some Modern Museum Acquisitions." Parnassus 4 (February 1932), p. 33.

C. J. Bulliet. Art Masterpieces in a Century of Progress Fine Arts Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. Chicago, 1933, unpaginated, under no. 114.

Helen Appleton Read. "Racial Quality of Hopper Pictures at Modern Museum Agrees with Nationalistic Mood." Brooklyn Daily Eagle (November 5, 1933), p. 12B-C, notes that this work is an "obvious human interest canvas" and thus "among his least successful efforts" in Exh. New York 1933.

Forbes Watson. "The Rise of Edward Hopper." Brooklyn Daily Eagle (November 5, 1933), ill. p. 14.

Edward Alden Jewell. "In the Realm of Art: Hopper's Superb One-Man Show." New York Times (November 5, 1933), p. 12X.

E. C. Sherburne. "The Hopper Exhibition." Christian Science Monitor (November 6, 1933), p. 10, notes that this work demonstrates Hopper's rare ability to incorporate decoration, realim, interpretation and expression into his paintings.

"Modern Museum Holds Hopper Exhibition." Art Digest 8 (November 1, 1933), p. 19.

Horace Gregory. "A Note on Hopper." New Republic (December 13, 1933), p. 132.

Mary Morsell. "Hopper Exhibition Clarifies a Phase of American Art." Art News 32 (November 4, 1933), p. 12, notes that in this and other works during this time the artist "seems to have completely abandoned his mistrust of the human figure" with the result of diminishing the power of the work.

"Edward Hopper: His Flair for Pictorial Interpretations of the Spirit of Place." New York Herald Tribune (November 5, 1933), sec. 5, p. 10.

Archer Winsten. "Wake of the News: Washington Square North Boasts Strangers Worth Talking To." New York Post (November 26, 1935), p. 15.

"Hopper is a Realist." Life 2 (May 3, 1937), ill. p. 45 (color).

"Edward Hopper Painting Bought by Metropolitan." New York Herald Tribune (March 26, 1937), p. 19.

"Carnegie Traces Hopper's Rise to Fame." Art Digest 11 (April 1, 1937), p. 14.

Charles Burchfield. "Hopper: Career of Silent Poetry." Art News 49 (March 1950), p. 17, notes how the artist is able to freeze mundane moment while implying a greater universal significance, like people mummified in the ruins at Pompeii.

Henry Geldzahler. "Edward Hopper." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 21 (November 1962), p. 117, fig. 5.

Jerrold Lanes. "U.S.A." Burlington Magazine 107 (January 1965), p. 45, fig. 55, notes Hopper draws inspiration in this work from French masters, including the cafe scenes of Edouard Manet and the perspectival manipulations of Edgar Degas.

"Edward Hopper is Dead at 84; Painter of the American Scene." New York Times (May 17, 1967), p. 32.

Thomas N. Maytham. Great American Paintings from the Boston and Metropolitan Museums. Exh. cat., Seattle Art Museum. Seattle, 1970, p. 130, no. 83, ill. p. 131.

Gerald Weales. "The Year of the Hopper." Hudson Review 25 (Spring 1972), p. 112.

Gail Levin. Edward Hopper as Illustrator. New York, 1979, p. 44, fig. 59.

Ann Barry. "The Full Range of Edward Hopper." New York Times (September 21, 1980), sec. 2, p. 30.

W. Draeger. "Zur Biographie." du 4 (1980), ill. p. 16-17 (color).

Gail Levin. "Hopper, un gigante del realismo americana: l'America e sola al mondo." Bolaffiarte 7 (October 1980), p. 48.

Ronald Paulson. "Edward Hopper and Some Precursors." Bennington Review (December 1980), p. 67.

Gail Levin. Edward Hopper: The Art and Artist. Exh. cat., Whitney Museum of American Art. New York, 1980, p. 52, colorpl. 329.

Louise Bruner. "Edward Hopper Art Exhibited in Chicago." The Blade (November 22, 1981), sec. G, p. 2.

Alan G. Artner. "Edward Hopper: The Personal Visions of an American Genius." Chicago Tribune Magazine (September 20, 1981), ill. pp. 26, cover (detail).

Gloria-Gilda Deák Kennedy Galleries, Inc. Profiles of American Artists Represented by Kennedy Galleries. New York, 1981, p. 80, praises the artist's ability to render light in this and other interior scenes.

Richard Elovich. "London: Edward Hopper." Burlington Magazine 123 (February 1981), p. 111, fig. 56, ill. (color, cover).

Anne Coffin Hanson. "Edward Hopper, American Meaning and French Craft." Art Journal 41 (Summer 1981), pl. 5, figs. 18-19 (details).

John Hollander. "Hopper and the Figure of Room." Art Journal 41 (Summer 1981), p. 158, pl. 5.

Gail Levin. "Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks"." Arts Magazine 55 (May 1981), p. 160.

Gail Levin. "Book Reviews: "Edward Hopper" by Robert Hobbs." New England Quarterly 61 (September 1988), p. 477.

Gail Levin. Edward Hopper: A Catalogue Raisonné. Vol. 3, Oils. New York, 1995, p. 205, no. O-274, ill.

Carol Troyen et al. Edward Hopper. Exh. cat., Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Boston, 2007, pp. 191, 196, 203, 242, no. 102, ill. pp. 176 (color detail), 185 (color).

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Guide. New York, 2012, p. 417, ill. (color).

Rosalind Ormiston. Edward Hopper Masterpieces. London, 2012, ill. p. 86 (color).



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