Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Tamamo no Mae and the Archer Miura Kuranosuke

Artist:
Formerly attributed to Yashima Gakutei (Japanese, 1786?–1868)
Period:
Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:
1835
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Polychrome woodblock print (surimono); ink and color on paper
Dimensions:
7 7/8 x 8 3/4 in. (20 x 22.2 cm)
Classification:
Prints
Credit Line:
Gift of Estate of Samuel Isham, 1914
Accession Number:
JP1038
Not on view
The Nine-Tailed Fox, disguised as a beautiful woman, was said to bewitch emperors in China and came to Japan disguised as Tamamo no Mae, a favorite concubine of the Toba emperor (1103–1156). Detected by the court astrologer Abe no Seimei, she flew away to Nasu Field, in northeast Japan, and was shot by the archer Miura Kuranosuke, whereupon she turned into a stone.
Signature: Gakutei
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Masterpieces from the Permanent Collection," July 2, 2005–November 29, 2005.

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