Art/ Collection/ Art Object
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Aegis of Sakhmet or Bastet

Period:
Late Period–Ptolemaic Period
Dynasty:
Dynasty 21–30
Date:
664–30 B.C.
Geography:
From Egypt
Medium:
Faience
Dimensions:
H. 3.7 cm (1 7/16 in); w. 3 cm (1 3/16 in)
Credit Line:
Gift of Helen Miller Gould, 1910
Accession Number:
10.130.2055
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 134
An aegis is a collarlike necklace (often called a broad-collar) bearing a divine head as symbol of protection and fertility. The aegis was an element of a sacred menat necklace from at least the 18th dynasty. Heads of Lion- or cat-headed goddesses were most frequently depicted, but other goddesses and some gods might appear.

Small faience examples like this one might serve as amulets.
Formerly in the collection of the Reverend Chauncey Murch (died 1907). Collected between 1883 and 1906 while Murch was a missionary in Egypt. Collection purchased by the Museum from the Murch family with funds provided by Helen Miller Gould, 1910.

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