Art/ Collection/ Art Object

Earrings with ibex head terminal

Period:
Ptolemaic Period
Date:
4th–3rd century B.C.
Geography:
From Egypt
Medium:
Gold
Dimensions:
a. As Worn: H. 1.5 × W. 1.6 cm (9/16 × 5/8 in.) b. As Worn: H. 1.5 × W. 1.6 cm (9/16 × 5/8 in.)
Credit Line:
Gift of Helen Miller Gould, 1910
Accession Number:
10.130.1508a, b
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 134
Hoops formed of wound wire with animal head terminals are the commonest type of Hellenistic earring. The heads on these earrings have been referred to as those of gazelles, but is now thought more likely to be an ibex. Ibex-head earrings are well-known in Egypt, but also Asia Minor and Cyprus.

The relatively simple decoration of these earrings points to an early Ptolemaic date.
Formerly in the collection of the Reverend Chauncey Murch (died 1907). Collected between 1883 and 1906 while Murch was a missionary in Egypt. Collection purchased by the Museum from the Murch family with funds provided by Helen Miller Gould, 1910.

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