Art/ Collection/ Art Object

華鬘
Keman (“Flower Garland” Temple Decoration)

Period:
Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:
ca. 1725
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Gilded bronze
Dimensions:
H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm); W. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm)
Classification:
Metalwork
Credit Line:
Fletcher Fund, 1925
Accession Number:
25.215.58
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 224
Keman (Sanskrit: kusumamala) literally means “garland of flowers,” and refers to pendant decorative disks, usually made of bronze in the shape of a round fan (uchiwa), that are suspended from beams of inner sanctuary of a temple, above a Buddhist statue. They are thought to have their origin in the garlands of fresh flowers that were offered to nobles in ancient India.
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Keman (“Flower Garland” Temple Decoration)

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