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Digital Media

The Digital Media Department leads the creation, production, presentation, and dissemination of multimedia content to support the viewing and understanding of the Met's collections and exhibitions, both within the galleries and online.

American West in Bronze Exhibition Blog

The American West in Bronze Audio Guide

Shannon Vittoria, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow, The American Wing

Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The Met launched its first audio guide in the 1960s, and although technology has come a long way since then, the objective remains the same: to enhance the visitor's experience of an artwork or an exhibition with engaging, interpretive audio content.

For a behind-the-scenes look at the making of The American West in Bronze Audio Guide, I met with Staci Hou, Assistant Content Producer in the Met's Digital Media Department. As Staci explained, "This exhibition is particularly well suited for an audio guide. It features objects in the round with fascinating stories. We wanted to focus on these stories, as well as the backgrounds of many of the artists in the show."

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Digital Underground

Creative Technologist Interview: Daniele Frazier's Implied Water

Don Undeen, Senior Manager of Media Lab, Digital Media

Posted: Wednesday, January 8, 2014

It should come as no surprise at this point that I'm interested in digital modeling and 3D printing; I like the idea that objects in the Met's collection can be used as inspiration and raw material for new works. For that reason, when I recognized a model of a Met object at 3D Notion, a recent exhibition of 3D-printed works at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University, I was immediately intrigued.

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Digital Underground

From New York to Castile

Jessica Glass, Audio-Visual Specialist, Digital Media

Posted: Monday, January 6, 2014

The 2013 production The Fuentidueña Apse: A Journey from Castile to New York was screened in Spain on November 27 as part of FICAB XIII, the 13th International Film Festival of the Bidasoa. The documentary explains how the twelfth-century Romanesque apse was dismantled in 1957 from the church of San Martín in Fuentidueña, north of Madrid, transported to New York, and installed at The Cloisters between 1958 and 1961. Christopher Noey directed and produced this 28-minute documentary and I was its editor; many people within Digital Media and across the Museum contributed to the project.

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Digital Underground

Conversations in the Digital Age

Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer

Posted: Friday, December 20, 2013

As I discussed in my first Digital Underground post, my Met colleagues do a lot of terrific digital and multimedia work. In an effort to get more attention to some of this work, I occasionally do interviews with the press. Recently, I was a guest on "Conversations in the Digital Age with Jim Zirin," a show that looks at "how the Internet is transforming the global landscape."

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Digital Underground

Digital Archives: Christmas Past

Stephanie Post, Senior Digital Asset Specialist, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, December 17, 2013

In 1937, for the very first time at the Museum, the Christmas spirit "received unusually graphic representation," according to The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin (December 1937). A small exhibition from December 19, 1937, through January 2, 1938, featured The Christmas Story in Art: The Nativity, the Adoration of the Shepherds, the Adoration of the Magi, and the Flight into Egypt as illustrated in forty paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, and decorative arts chosen from the Museum's collection.

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Digital Underground

Creative Technologist Interview: Jonathan Monaghan's Leda and the Marsyas

Don Undeen, Senior Manager of Media Lab, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, November 26, 2013

At the Met, we've been experimenting with ways that museum visitors can use 3D scanning, hacking, and printing to enhance their experience of works of art. In light of our recent explorations, we caught up with Jonathan Monaghan, a creative technologist who participated in our 3D Hackathon back in 2012, to ask him some questions about one of the works he created that weekend and about his work with 3D printing and CGI animation.

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Digital Underground

The Making of 82nd & Fifth

Howard Silver, Media Producer for Special Projects, Digital Media

Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2013

Each week this year, our web series 82nd & Fifth has brought you a little deeper into the world of the Met. In the close to ninety episodes we've posted so far, you've gotten to hear Museum curators talk about works of art that changed the way they see the world. We've produced a short video to give you a behind-the-scenes look at how our team of editors, producers, and photographers creates each two-minute episode.

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Digital Underground

Good Photographs Make for Great Digital 3D Models

Don Undeen, Senior Manager of Media Lab, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, November 12, 2013

In my last post, I introduced some of the work we're doing at the Museum with 3D scanning, modeling, and printing. I hope I piqued your interest in photographing objects in the galleries and turning those images into digital 3D models for use in your own artistic creations. Today I'm going to talk about the photography process: how to get the best images for use with the 3D-modeling program 123D Catch, and how to take pictures of an object without putting it at risk of unintended contact.

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Digital Underground

New Ways to Connect with the Met

Annie Dolmatch, Website Managing Editor

Posted: Monday, November 4, 2013

Last month we launched two new sections of metmuseum.org: Met Blogs, which collects and presents posts from blogs across the site, and Community, which highlights our activity on a wide array of social media channels. These new sections are designed to invite visitors to find new ways to connect with the Museum.

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Digital Underground

Seeing the Met through Glass

Neal Stimler, Associate Digital Asset Specialist

Posted: Monday, October 28, 2013

You've probably heard a lot about Google Glass, the mobile wearable technology created by Google that enables users to capture images and video, to receive email, SMS messages, and social media updates, and to find directions or browse the Internet. Although it's arguably the most famous, it's only one of many new mobile devices that has emerged in a field of wearable cameras, smart watches, and wristbands. We can all imagine how to use these devices in our daily lives, but what about inside a museum?

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