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Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Medieval Art

The Museum's collection of medieval and Byzantine art is among the most comprehensive in the world. Displayed in both the Main Building and in the Metropolitan's branch in northern Manhattan, The Cloisters museum and gardens, the collection encompasses the art of the Mediterranean and Europe from the fall of Rome in the fourth century to the beginning of the Renaissance in the early sixteenth century. It also includes pre-medieval European works of art created during the Bronze Age and early Iron Age.

Winchester Bible Exhibition Blog

Heroes of the Old Testament: Picturing the Story of David and Goliath

C. Griffith Mann, Michel David-Weill Curator in Charge, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Wednesday, January 7, 2015

The Winchester Bible: A Masterpiece of Medieval Art offers an unprecedented opportunity to examine one of the great surviving monuments of twelfth-century art. Presented together with the Morgan Leaf, which is reunited for the first time with the book to which it once belonged, the exhibition occupies the heart of the Museum's medieval European galleries. This setting offers an ideal context for exploring the Winchester Bible.

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In Season

Scenes of the Season

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, The Cloisters

Posted: Friday, January 2, 2015

The Belles Heures of Jean de France, duc de Berry, is an extraordinary illuminated manuscript and one of the great treasures of The Cloisters Collection. It is also relevant to the holiday season, as a few of its astonishingly beautiful illuminations depict scenes from the Christmas story.

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Winchester Bible Exhibition Blog

Who Ordered the Winchester Bible?

Charles T. Little, Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Deluxe giant Bibles were prestige works for major ecclesiastical institutions, but there is no record, written or otherwise, that clearly identifies the patron of the Winchester Bible. We assume that the bishop of Winchester, Henry of Blois (about 1098–1171) patronized its creation since he was of privileged background and the younger brother of King Stephen of England (r. 1135–54) and grandson of William the Conqueror. As a child oblate dedicated to become a monk at the great Burgundian abbey of Cluny, he quickly rose in the ranks of the Church to become abbot of Glastonbury in 1126, the richest abbey in Norman England, and in 1129 the bishop of Winchester, the richest cathedral in the land.

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Winchester Bible Exhibition Blog

What Is a Giant Bible?

Charles T. Little, Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Giant Bibles such as the Winchester Bible, the subject of the current exhibition at the Metropolitan, were among the most ambitious enterprises for major medieval scriptoria. They are massive volumes containing the Holy Scriptures as they were translated into Latin by Saint Jerome (ca. 342–60), and the great age of their creation was the later eleventh and twelfth centuries. Giant Bibles probably started out as prestigious papal gifts—several were produced in Rome itself—but they quickly became more widespread.

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In Season

Among the Leaves So Green

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, The Cloisters

Posted: Tuesday, December 23, 2014

The Cloisters museum and gardens will be decorated for the holidays through January 6. Today's post is intended to provide historical context for the designs, explain how the decorations are made, and to entice readers to visit and see them in person.

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Winchester Bible Exhibition Blog

Winchester as an Artistic Center

Charles T. Little, Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Wednesday, December 17, 2014

The Winchester Bible has resided in the place of its making since the Middle Ages, and has left for only brief periods of time for such occasions as its current exhibition at the Metropolitan. It is the centerpiece of the holdings of the Winchester Cathedral Library. Marking the high point of manuscript production at Winchester, the great Bible was the culmination of a long tradition of creating sumptuous manuscripts central to the spiritual life of the cathedral and its affiliated monastic communities. Before larger European cities became the driving force for artistic production, places like Winchester—which was both the royal seat of power and a spiritual and pilgrimage center—fostered the creation of amazing works for many years.

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In Season

A Cloisters Cartoon

Mortimer Lebigre, Graphic Designer, Design Department

Posted: Thursday, December 11, 2014

Winchester Bible Exhibition Blog

Welcome to The Winchester Bible

Charles T. Little, Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Welcome to the exhibition blog for The Winchester Bible: A Masterpiece of Medieval Art, opening today. Throughout the run of the exhibition, curators, conservators, and outside scholars will explore a variety of topics related to the display of this magnificent work and will attempt to present a fuller picture of its visual and thematic richness, artistic issues, and historical context. Some of the planned topics include giant Bibles as an art form, the patronage and production of the Winchester Bible, individual masters who worked on the book, and issues of conservation. We hope, through these weekly posts, to develop a fuller understanding of this important Bible, raise new questions, and inspire conversation.

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In Season

Cobill Nuts, Christmastide, and The Cloisters

Christina Alphonso, Administrator, The Cloisters

Posted: Thursday, December 4, 2014

Christmastide, the medieval celebration of Christmas, provides us with the opportunity to decorate The Cloisters with traditional materials to celebrate the season. As regular visitors and readers know, the decorative designs and elements are based on medieval evidence and are fabricated almost entirely from fresh seasonal materials. Among them is the familiar hazelnut.

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In Season

The Portal of Villeloin-Coulangé at The Cloisters: Attribution After Eighty Years of Anonymity

Lucretia Kargère, Conservator, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens; and Nancy Wu, Museum Educator, The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014

Every curator, at one point or another, has to grapple with questions of provenance. In the case of medieval stone sculpture, works often come to us in fragmentary states, roughly removed from their original sites during revolutionary events, or cautiously salvaged from monuments that have not been cared for over time. Conservators, scientists, and art historians often collaborate to solve questions of geographic origin and attribution.

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