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Posts Tagged "Piano"

Of Note

From the Ancient to the Present: Musical Instruments at the Met

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, October 19, 2015

The Department of Musical Instruments is pleased to announce the publication of a new book, Musical Instruments: Highlights of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This insightful catalogue features more than one hundred extraordinary musical instruments, from ancient cultures to the present, created by gifted artists from across the globe.

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Met Museum Presents Blog

Daring Performances in Iconic Spaces: A 2015 Met Museum Presents Itinerary

Meryl Cates, Press Officer, Met Museum Presents

Posted: Friday, June 12, 2015

Over the course of this past season, live arts at the Met have offered audiences daring and intriguing performances. By staging events right in the galleries and commissioning new works specifically for these powerful and iconic spaces, Met Museum Presents invites audiences to connect and engage with their surroundings and to be active in the performance experience.

While reflecting on this past season, as well as looking ahead to our 2015–16 season, we've assembled this special itinerary to give visitors the opportunity to view the galleries that have inspired memorable performances and have sparked the creativity of some of today's most fearless artists.

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Met Museum Presents Blog

Bringing Change to Classical Music: Lang Lang at the Met

Kongkong Jiang, Intern, Concerts & Lectures

Posted: Friday, May 8, 2015

In the minds of Chinese children who play the piano, Lang Lang is a super idol—especially when his fingers fly across the piano keyboard. As a pianist myself, I cannot simply define Lang Lang as a traditional classical-music artist; he is both a renowned pianist and, in many ways, a cultural ambassador to China, helping to bring classical music to a larger audience.

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Of Note

Happy Birthday, Johannes

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2015

The German composer Johannes Brahms was born on May 7, 1833, in the city of Hamburg. In addition to being a virtuosic pianist, Brahms also composed for orchestra, chorus, chamber ensembles of various combinations, and solo instruments. He was friends with many of the leading musicians of the nineteenth century, and was particularly close to composer Clara Schumann and to Joseph Joachim, the famed violinist to whom Brahms dedicated many of his works for that instrument.

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Of Note

An Unusual Irish Piano

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, March 16, 2015

Dublin had a flourishing music scene in the eighteenth century. The city had two cathedrals, St. Patrick's and Christ Church, that both employed a retinue of full-time professional musicians. In addition, a state orchestra was also maintained to provide music for civic occasions. Musicians were attracted to Dublin for these positions and found ample additional opportunities for music making in the numerous concert halls and theaters across the city. Dublin even attracted George Frederick Handel, who visited in 1741 and 1742, and premiered the Messiah there on April 13, 1742.

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Met Museum Presents Blog

Returning a Museum Treasure to the Limelight for Bach's Goldberg Variations

Michael Cirigliano II, Website Editor, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Despite its immense popularity in the worlds of both classical music and pop culture, Johann Sebastian Bach's Goldberg Variations is actually not a work that is regularly performed or recorded. A seminal statement of Baroque keyboard composition, the sprawling, seventy-minute collection of an aria and thirty variations remains a heralded benchmark of technical virtuosity and musical intelligence for which few pianists confidently rise to the occasion. Even soloist Jeremy Denk, one of the most respected pianists on the global concert circuit today, remarked that "the Goldberg Variations have caused me more misery than any other piece of music in history . . ." However, New York audiences have a chance to encounter this masterwork right here at the Met on November 21, when pianist Christopher Taylor presents The Goldberg Variations: The Double Manual Experience in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.

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Of Note

Celebrating National Piano Month, Part Three

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014

As September and National Piano Month come to an end, the Department of Musical Instruments wraps up its series of posts highlighting some of the most important pianos from The Metropolitan Museum of Art—home to one of the most comprehensive collections of historic pianos to be found anywhere in the world. After showcasing the work of Erard & Co., Joseph Böhm, Conrad Graf, Nunns & Clark, Johann Schmidt, and Carl Bechstein in previous installments, the celebration finishes with five final examples of pianos from the Museum's collection—including the oldest extant piano in the world.

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Of Note

Celebrating National Piano Month, Part Two

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Wednesday, September 24, 2014

In honor of National Piano Month, the Department of Musical Instruments continues its series of posts highlighting some of the most important, unusual, and visually interesting pianos from The Metropolitan Museum of Art—home to one of the most important and comprehensive collections of historic pianos to be found anywhere in the world. After exploring the craftsmanship of Erard & Co., Joseph Böhm, F. Beale & Co., John Geib and Son, and Conrad Graf in the first installment, the survey continues with five more examples of historic pianos from the Museum's collection.

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Of Note

Celebrating National Piano Month, Part One

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Friday, September 19, 2014

The piano has been an integral part of Western music since the late eighteenth century. Although invented around the year 1700, it took several decades before the instrument had become a favorite of composers and performers alike. The piano underwent enormous change in its first 150 years, and the two regional schools of instrument makers—located in Vienna and London—gave musicians a large choice of pianos with differing tonal characteristics. Versions of the instrument eventually developed that were space-efficient, first the square piano and later the upright, which allowed it to find its way into middle-class homes.

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Of Note

Happy Birthday, Mr. Mendelssohn

Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014

February 3 marks the birthday of nineteenth-century German composer Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809–1847). A prolific composer, Mendelssohn wrote pieces for orchestra, chamber ensembles, and solo piano.

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