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Posts Tagged "Turkey"

Travel Blog

Museum Visits in Ankara and Istanbul

Deniz Beyazit, Assistant Curator, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014

With a cultural heritage that spans world civilization from prehistoric to contemporary times, Turkey is home to some very important museums. In the past week, we've seen some of the top Turkish museums, including the recently reopened Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara, which we visited on a day trip when traveling from Cappadocia to Istanbul.

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Travel Blog

Day Trip to Bursa

Deniz Beyazit, Assistant Curator, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Today we had to get up early to catch a seaplane to Bursa, the first Ottoman capital and city, which is about 250 kilometers south of Istanbul.

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Travel Blog

The High Winds and Deep Valleys of Cappadocia

Deniz Beyazit, Assistant Curator, Department of Islamic Art

Posted: Friday, September 5, 2014

The first stop on our journey to Turkey was Cappadocia, inhabited since Hittite times and famous for its unique landscape, where wind and erosion naturally created deep valleys of sand-dune-like formations and its characteristic Peri chimneys.

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Travel Blog

Disembarking and Reflecting in Istanbul

Jeffrey Blair, Assistant Secretary and Senior Associate Counsel

Posted: Sunday, May 4, 2014

After visiting Sochi, Russia, traveling across the Romanian countryside to see the incredible painted churches of Bucovina, and stopping in the Bulgarian ports of Varna and Nessebar to behold amazing archaeological artifacts, we returned to our starting point: Istanbul/Constantinople. Disembarking here is a poignant end to a trip throughout a rich, multicultural region that has been so influenced by this ancient yet modern city for centuries. It has been an incredible journey—one filled with illuminating lectures and discussions, new discoveries, and many interesting people.

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Travel Blog

Monasteries in Turkey and Georgia

Jeffrey Blair, Assistant Secretary and Senior Associate Counsel

Posted: Friday, May 2, 2014

From the ancient Turkish port of Trabzon (formerly Trebizond), we traveled up into the hills to visit the monastery at Sumela. Built into the cliff, with dramatic views of the gorge below, the group received a lively and engaging explanation by curator Helen Evans of the monastery's wall frescoes dating from the sixteenth century. From Turkey, our group sailed to Batumi, Georgia—a rapidly growing city—before traveling inland to Kutaisi to visit a monastery and cathedral dating back to the tenth and eleventh centuries, respectively. Both are UNESCO World Heritage sites, although the recent and controversial restoration of the cathedral has placed it on a watch list, which may result in removal of the designation by UNESCO.

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Travel Blog

The Sights and Tastes of Istanbul

Jeffrey Blair, Assistant Secretary and Senior Associate Counsel

Posted: Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Our trip began today by bringing together the various groups of travelers in Istanbul for lunch: those here for the trip's prelude, others exploring the city on their own, and those arriving today on the group flight from New York. After a sampling of cuisine inspired by Ottoman palace menus, our group then toured the incredible Hagia Sophia. We then strolled on the plaza facing the six minarets of the beautiful Blue Mosque before boarding the bus and driving out of Sultanahmet, across the Golden Horn to our ship, the Variety Voyager. We settled into our cabins and dined on-deck while sailing out of Istanbul, up the Bosphorus and into the Black Sea. Tomorrow brings a day of relaxation at sea as our journey continues east.

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Now at the Met

This Weekend in Met History: November 21

Melissa Bowling, Associate Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Friday, November 19, 2010

On November 21, 1870, The Metropolitan Museum of Art accessioned its first work of art—a Roman marble sarcophagus found in 1863 at Tarsus in Cilicia (modern southern Turkey). This finely worked but unfinished sarcophagus came to the Museum as a gift from J. Abdo Debbas, the American vice consul at Tarsus. Debbas, a native of the province of Adana, Turkey, served in the United States Department of State there until 1882.

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