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News of the Stag from the series known as the Hunters' Chase

Mortlake Tapestry Manufactory (British, 1619–1703)

Artist:
Related to designs probably by Bernard van Orley (Netherlandish, Brussels ca. 1492–1541/42 Brussels)
Date:
designed before 1645, woven ca. 1645–75
Culture:
British, Mortlake
Medium:
Wool (15-16 warps per inch, 6-7 per cm.)
Dimensions:
H. 136 x W. 183 inches (345.4 x 464.8 cm)
Classification:
Textiles-Tapestries
Credit Line:
Gift of Amory S. Carhart, 1957
Accession Number:
57.127
  • Description

    This tapestry is one from a nine-piece series known as the Hunters’ Chase. Curiously-enough, given its secular subject-matter, the original edition was commissioned by the Dutch Church in London, in 1645. Francis Clein designed four of the pieces in the series from scratch; the other five, including News of the Stag, were based on existing tapestry designs by the great 16th-century artist Bernard van Orley for his influential, Brussels-woven Hunts of Maximilian. Hunters’ Chase proved incredibly popular for Mortlake, resulting in much-needed commissions for the floundering manufactory: at least 8 different re-editions were woven during the following decades, including that of which this News of the Stag was part.
    For more info see Edith Standen, European post-medieval tapestries and related hangings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1985 (vol.2, cat.125) and Wendy Hefford in Tapestry in the Baroque: Threads of Splendor, MMA exh.cat. 2007 (p.182).

  • Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

    Marking: (lower right border) Manufactory mark (Mortlake)

  • Provenance

    Sackville family (which became Sackville-West in 1843) , Knole House, Kent, England (until 1911) ; J. Pierpont Morgan (in 1911) ; Amory S. Carhart , Tuxedo Park, New York (ca. 1916–57; to MMA)

  • See also
    Who
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
228717

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