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Alabaster alabastron (perfume vase)

Period:
Archaic
Date:
early 6th century B.C.
Culture:
Etruscan
Medium:
Alabaster
Dimensions:
H.: 14 in. (35.6 cm)
Classification:
Miscellaneous-Stone Vases
Credit Line:
Purchase, The Concordia Foundation Gift, 2008
Accession Number:
2008.332
  • Description

    Cut from one piece of stone, the vase consists of the container, in the form of a woman holding a lotos flower, and a base embellished with four female heads. The work is an Etruscan response to perfume flasks with the busts of women that originated in the Near East and spawned adaptations in Cyprus, East Greece, and Etruria. The concept of decorating four sides of a vessel ultimately derives from the East as well. Related works are exhibited in the Belfer Court on the main floor.

  • Provenance

    Said to be from Vulci (Sotheby’s New York, June 5, 2008, lot 15)

    By 1963 and until 1975, collection of Mrs. Brenda Bomford and H. J. P. Bomford, Esq., Wiltshire, United Kingdom; July 1975, purchased by a Japanese private collector through Sotheby’s, London; 1975-2008, private collection, Japan; acquired in 2008, purchased through Sotheby’s, New York.

  • References

    Haynes, Sybille. 1963. "An Etruscan Alabastron." Antike Kunst, 6: pl. 1.

    Lightfoot, Christopher S. 2010. "Recent Acquisitions, A Selection: 2008-2010." The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, 68(2): pp. 6-7.

    de Puma, Richard Daniel. 2013. Etruscan Art in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. New Haven and London: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, no. 4.25, pp. 12, 66-7.

  • See also
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
258094

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