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The American Civil War: Paintings on the Battlefront and Home Front

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Edward Everett

Southworth and Hawes (American, active 1843–1863)

Artist:
Albert Sands Southworth (American, West Fairlee, Vermont 1811–1894 Charlestown, Massachusetts)
Artist:
Josiah Johnson Hawes (American, Wayland, Massachusetts 1808–1901 Crawford Notch, New Hampshire)
Date:
ca. 1850
Medium:
Daguerreotype
Dimensions:
21.6 x 16.5 cm (8 1/2 x 6 1/2 in.)
Classification:
Photographs
Credit Line:
Gift of I. N. Phelps Stokes, Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes, 1937
Accession Number:
37.14.21
  • Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

    Marking: Hallmark, TR, TL: 40 / H.S. (see Spirit of Fact #18, p. 155)

  • Provenance

    Edward S. Hawes, Alice Mary Hawes, and Marion Augusta Hawes; [Holman's Print Shop, Boston]; I.N. Phelps Stokes, New York, 1937

  • Notes

    In January, 1848, Everett wrote to Southworth & Hawes: "I received the three daguerreotypes yesterday, but not till I had sent you my note on the subject."

    Biography: A minister at Boston's Brattle Street Church by the age of nineteen, and a professor of Greek literature at Harvard by twenty-one, Edward Everett (1794-1865) was considered one of the greatest orators of his time. He was elected to Congress as a Whig, and sat in the House for ten years (1825-35), after which he served as governor of Massachusetts (1836-40). Over the next decade, he was ambassador to England (1841-45) and president of Harvard (1846-49). He wasappointed secretary of state upon the death of Daniel Webster in 1852. He served a brief term in the U.S. Senate (1853-54), but illness forced his resignation. Everett remained a public figure, and was invited to deliver the main speech at the dedication of GettysburgNational Cemetery in 1863. His long speech was trumped by Lincoln's breif but inspiring remarks, to which Everett responded in a note to the president: "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near the central idea of the occasion in two hours, as you did in two minutes."

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    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
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