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Spear Foreshaft

Date:
late 19th–early 20th century
Geography:
Vanuatu, Malakula
Culture:
Big Nambas people
Medium:
Wood, bamboo, fiber
Dimensions:
W. 4 5/16 x D. 19 1/8 in. (11 x 48.6 cm)
Classification:
Wood-Implements
Credit Line:
The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Bequest of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979
Accession Number:
1979.206.1414
  • Description

    Chiefs of the Big Nambas people of northwest Malakula Island formerly possessed a specialized category of spears that served as fearsome vehicles of retribution. Roughly ten feet (3 m) long, they consisted of a long bamboo shaft surmounted by a carved wood foreshaft such as that seen here, adorned with stylized faces representing powerful ancestors. The conical projection at the top once held a spear point of human bone, a supernaturally powerful material that increased the weapon's efficacy. A small portion of the original bamboo shaft appears at the base.
    Owned and controlled by chiefs, these spears were used primarily by maho, a class of professional assassins dispatched by the chiefs to kill enemies in retaliation for
    insults, infractions of customary law, or deaths caused by warfare or malevolent magic. The stylized facial features of the heads on the foreshafts are similar to those of the Big Nambas gable ornaments (p´naret).

  • Provenance

    [Matthias Komor, New York, until 1955]; Nelson A. Rockefeller, New York, 1955, on loan to The Museum of Primitive Art, New York, 1956–1978

  • See also
    What
    Where
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
313603:1

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