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High chest of drawers

Date:
1710–30
Geography:
New England, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Culture:
American
Medium:
Japanned soft maple, poplar, white pine
Dimensions:
62 1/2 x 39 1/2 x 21 1/4 in. (158.8 x 100.3 x 54 cm)
Classification:
Furniture
Credit Line:
Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1940
Accession Number:
40.37.3
  • Description

    Japanning, a Western imitation of oriental lacquerwork, became fashionable in the colonies after 1700. A stylish surface treatment in which motifs of vaguely Far Eastern origin were raised, gilded, and varnished, japanning was applied to standard furniture forms and, when bright and new, must have produced a dazzling effect. Here the motifs are arranged on a solid black ground in a relaxed, undulating pattern in which people, animals, oversize flowers, and tiny pavilions happily coexist. A new form introduced in the colonies in the 1690s at the same time as the early Baroque style—known in America as the William and Mary style—the high chest of drawers was the most prestigious piece of furniture in the early eighteenth century. Built in separate upper and lower sections, it was characterized in this period by a skirt and stretchers enlivened by curves and turned legs and feet on which bulbous shapes were boldly juxtaposed to narrow tapers. One of the earliest American examples of japanning, this high chest descended in the Pickman family of Boston and Salem.

  • Provenance

    Benjamin Pickman, Salem, Massachusetts, until died 1773; his son, Benjamin Pickman, Salem, until died 1819; his grandson, Thomas Pickman; his daughter, Mary Pickman Loring; by descent, George B. Loring; by descent, Lawrence Dwight, until died 1918; his fiancee, Harriet Amory (later Mrs. Warwick Potter), New York, until 1940

  • See also
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
4286:15

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