Quantcast
Videos ()
The Artistic Heritage of Modena: Wounded Art

Close

Young Woman with a Pearl Necklace

Copy after Willem Drost (Dutch, late 17th or early 18th century)

Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
33 1/8 x 24 1/2 in. (84.1 x 62.2 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913
Accession Number:
14.40.629
  • Gallery Label

    The sitter bears a resemblance to Hendrickje Stoffels (born about 1625–26, died 1663), Rembrandt's common-law wife and the subject of a number of his portraits, one of which is in the Metropolitan. The picture is the work of a pupil of Rembrandt, and the strong light striking the face suggests that it may be by Barent Fabritius. Another version is in Dresden.

  • Catalogue Entry

    Forthcoming

  • Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

    Inscription: Inscribed (lower right): [illegible]

  • Provenance

    John Osmaston, Hawkhurst Court, Billinghurst, Sussex; [Lesser, London, in 1909]; [Duveen, London, until 1910; sold for $136,360 to Altman]; Benjamin Altman, New York (1910–d. 1913)

  • Exhibition History

    New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Rembrandt/Not Rembrandt in The Metropolitan Museum of Art," October 10, 1995–January 7, 1996, no. 30.

    New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art," September 18, 2007–January 6, 2008, no catalogue.

  • References

    C[ornelis]. Hofstede de Groot. "Œuvres de Rembrandt nouvellement découvertes." L'art flamand & hollandais 12, no. 12 (1909), pp. 167–68, fig. 7 [published in Dutch in Onze Kunst 16 (December 1909), p. 181, fig. 7], as in the possession of Lesser, London; attributes it to Rembrandt, calls it a portrait of Hendrickje Stoffels, and dates it to the artist's best period; identifies the painting in Dresden [see Notes], then attributed to Barent Fabritius, as a copy.

    Wilhelm von Bode. Letter to Mr. Duveen. February 2, 1910, attributes it to Rembrandt, identifies the sitter as Hendrickje Stoffels, and dates it about 1656.

    Handbook of the Benjamin Altman Collection. New York, 1914, pp. 21–22, no. 13, as Hendrickje Stoffels by Rembrandt, from the collection of J. Osmaston.

    Wilhelm R. Valentiner. "The Rembrandts of the Altman Collection: I." Art in America 2 (August 1914), pp. 358, 361, calls it a portrait of Hendrickje by Rembrandt of 1656.

    C[ornelis]. Hofstede de Groot. A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch Painters of the Seventeenth Century. 6, London, 1916, p. 339, no. 719, as Hendrickje Stoffels by Rembrandt; dates it about 1658; calls the painting in Dresden [see Notes] a copy after this work by Bernaert Fabritius; gives provenance information.

    Abraham Bredius. "Wiedergefundene 'Rembrandts'." Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst, n.s., 32 (1921), p. 151, rejects the attribution to Rembrandt, assigning it to a student, possibly Barent Fabritius.

    Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Rembrandt wiedergefundene Gemälde. Stuttgart, 1921, pp. XXIII, 133, ill. p. 87, dates it about 1658.

    Alan Burroughs. "Rembrandts in the Metropolitan Museum." The Arts 4 (November 1923), p. 272, calls it "the so-called 'Portrait of Hendrickje Stoffels,' a weak study identical with one by B. Fabritius in the Dresden Gallery, and probably painted by a fellow pupil".

    John C. van Dyke. Rembrandt and His School. New York, 1923, pp. 77–78, pl. XIV-52, as probably by Barent Fabritius; questions the identification of the sitter as Hendrickje, while listing three more pictures of the same model.

    François Monod. "La Galerie Altman au Metropolitan Museum de New-York (2e article)." Gazette des beaux-arts, 5th ser., 8 (November 1923), p. 302, rejects the attribution to Rembrandt, calling it probably a study by Maes during his time in Rembrandt's workshop; refers to it as "le portrait supposé de Hendrickje Stoffels".

    Handbook of the Benjamin Altman Collection. 2nd ed. New York, 1928, pp. 64–65, no. 30.

    Katalog der alten Meister. 12th ed. Dresden, 1930, p. 67, under no. 1591, attributes the Dresden picture to Drost and calls it a copy after the MMA painting by Rembrandt.

    Wilhelm R. Valentiner. Rembrandt Paintings in America. New York, 1931, unpaginated, no. 136, pl. 136, calls the attribution to Rembrandt "not quite certain" and adds that the picture is very close to the work of Barent Fabritius, "whose similar although somewhat weaker painting is preserved in the Dresden Gallery".

    Wilhelm R. Valentiner. "Willem Drost: Pupil of Rembrandt." Art Quarterly 2 (Autumn 1939), p. 318, fig. 24, attributes it to Barent Fabritius and calls it a copy after the picture in Dresden, which he attributes to Drost.

    D. Pont. Barent Fabritius, 1624–1673. Utrecht, 1958, p. 133, includes it among pictures he has not seen and therefore declines to offer an attribution.

    Benjamin A. Rifkin. "Rembrandt and His Circle, Part I." Art News 68 (May 1969), p. 27, attributes it to Barent Fabritius and calls it a copy after the painting by Drost in Dresden.

    Werner Sumowski. "Beiträge zu Willem Drost." Pantheon 27 (September–October 1969), p. 382 n. 13, under no. 3, calls it a copy after the Dresden picture, which he attributes to Drost.

    Werner Sumowski. "J. A. Backer–A. van Dijck." Gemälde der Rembrandt-Schüler. 1, Landau/Pfalz, 1983–[94?], p. 616, under no. 332, calls it a copy, with some changes in the costume, after Drost's painting in Dresden, which he dates about 1654.

    Walter Liedtke in "Paintings, Drawings, and Prints: Art-Historical Perspectives." Rembrandt/Not Rembrandt in The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Aspects of Connoisseurship. Exh. cat., The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2, New York, [1995], pp. 108, 110–11, 119, no. 30, ill. (color), as "Young Woman with a Pearl Necklace"; calls it a copy after Drost, but rejects an attribution to Barent Fabritius.

    Jonathan Bikker. "Willem Drost (1633–1658): A Rembrandt Pupil in Amsterdam, Rome, and Venice." PhD diss., Universiteit Utrecht, 2001, p. 85, under no. 7, fig. 7a, lists it as a copy after the Dresden picture.

    Jonathan Bikker. Willem Drost (1633–1659): A Rembrandt Pupil in Amsterdam and Venice. New Haven, 2005, p. 67, under no. 7, fig. 7a.

    Walter Liedtke. Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 2007, vol. 1, pp. 178–80, no. 40, colorpl. 40, states that "a date in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century would appear likely".

    Esmée Quodbach. "The Age of Rembrandt: Dutch Paintings in The Metropolitan Museum of Art." Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 65 (Summer 2007), p. 35.



  • Notes

    This is a copy after a painting by Drost in the Gemäldegalerie, Dresden, that Sumowski [see Ref. 1983] dates about 1654. The Dresden picture was formerly attributed to Barent Fabritius.

  • See also
    Who
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
436212

Close