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Treble Viol

Jean Ouvrard

Date:
1726
Geography:
Paris, France
Culture:
Paris, France
Medium:
Wood
Dimensions:
Body length: 34.5 cm. Body width: upper bout 16.5 cm. center bout 11.2 cm. lower bout 19.5 cm. Rib height: top block: 5.4 cm. center bout 6.95 cm bottom block 7/15 cm. String length: 37.0 cm.
Classification:
Chordophone-Lute-bowed-fretted
Credit Line:
The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889
Accession Number:
89.4.946
  • Description

    With original neck, fingerboard, and tailpiece in unaltered condition; a typical example of a professional musician's instrument.

    Viols were the most esteemed bowed instruments of the late Renaissance, and they were only gradually displaced by the violin family. Viols differ from violins chiefly in shape, in number of strings and tuning, and in having fretted necks. All viols are played in an upright position between the knees or on the legs (gamba means "leg"), and the bow is held palm upwards. Their sound is less brilliant and quieter than that of the violin family. Chamber music for a consort of four to six viols was composed during the Renaissance and Baroque eras, and solo works for the bass viol were being played until nearly the end of the 18th century.

  • Signatures, Inscriptions, and Markings

    Marking: (printed on paper label) JEAN OUVRARD/ McLuthier à Paris,/ 1726

  • References

    Laurence Libin. A Checklist of Viole da Gamba (Viols). 2. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1989, pg. 7, 11, ill.

    William L. Monical. A Checklist of Viole da Gamba (Viols). The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1979, pg. v, viii, ill.

    Pleasing Eye and Ear Alike. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 1971, Vol. XXX, No. 2, pg. 68, ill.

    Catalogue of the Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments: Europe. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York, 1904, vol. I, pg. 65, ill.



  • See also
    Who
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
501556:1

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