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Large Kneeling Statue of Hatshepsut

Period:
New Kingdom
Dynasty:
Dynasty 18
Reign:
Joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III
Date:
ca. 1473–1458 B.C.
Geography:
From Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Deir el-Bahri, Senenmut Quarry, MMA 1927–1928
Medium:
Granite
Dimensions:
h. 261.5 cm (102 15/16 in); w. 80 cm (31 1/2 in); d. 137 cm (53 15/16 in)
Credit Line:
Rogers Fund, 1929
Accession Number:
29.3.1
  • Description

    This large kneeling statue once was part of a group of similar figures aligned on the right-hand (northern) side of the processional way, most probably in the second court of the temple. The pharaoh wears the nemes headdress, and around her neck is a chain of tubular beads from which hangs an amulet of somewhat enigmatic form (a double pouch pierced with a thorn ?). It is an adornment copied from the Middle Kingdom statues of Senwosret III that stood in the temple of Mentuhotep II, just south of Hatshepsut's monument.
    According to the inscription on the base, "Maatkare" (Hatshepsut) is represented here as "the one who gives Maat to Amun." Maat was the goddess of order, right balance, and justice, and for a king to offer an image of Maat to another deity meant reaffirming that this was the guiding principle of his/her rule.

  • Provenance

    Museum excavations, 1927-28. Acquired by the Museum in the division of finds, 1929.

  • See also
    What
    Where
    When
    In the Museum
    Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History
    MetPublications
544449

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