Quantcast

The Metropolitan Museum of Art LogoEmail

Type the CAPTCHA word:

Now at the Met

Met and Egyptian Government Jointly Announce Recognition of Egypt's Title to 19 Objects

Posted: Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Met Director Thomas P. Campbell and Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt, announced jointly today that, effective immediately, the Museum will acknowledge Egypt's title to nineteen ancient Egyptian objects in its collection since early in the 20th century.

Read More

Now at the Met

Met to Undertake Major Redesign and Reconstruction of Fifth Avenue Outdoor Plaza and Fountains

Posted: Tuesday, November 9, 2010

The Museum announced yesterday that it will undertake a comprehensive, multi-year effort to redesign and rebuild the four-block-long outdoor plaza that fronts its landmark Fifth Avenue facade. The project will feature as one of its centerpiece elements the design and installation of all-new fountains outside the building. Following formal approval of the project at yesterday's meeting of its Board of Trustees, the Metropolitan further announced that it has named OLIN, the award-winning landscape architecture and urban design firm with studios in Philadelphia and Los Angeles, to lead this effort.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: October 31

Adrianna Del Collo, Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Sunday, October 31, 2010

One hundred years ago today, Edward Robinson, curator of classical art and assistant director at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, was named the Museum's third director. Known for his broad knowledge, connoisseurship, and professionalism, he was a logical choice to replace the accomplished Sir Casper Purdon Clarke, who had reluctantly resigned from his duties after a long struggle with declining health.

Read More

Now at the Met

"The Secret of Édouard Baldus Revealed"

Malcolm Daniel, Senior Curator, Department of Photographs

Posted: Tuesday, October 26, 2010

"The secret of Édouard Baldus"—that was the subject line of an email I received recently. I rolled my eyes. "Right," I said to myself, "the secret of Édouard Baldus." I wrote my doctoral dissertation on Édouard Baldus (1813–1889), the nineteenth-century French photographer of landscape and architecture, and had the enormous pleasure of introducing him to the general public through a beautiful show and catalogue in 1994. Ever since, I've been "Mr. Baldus."

Read More

Now at the Met

Fall Season

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Friday, October 22, 2010

The fall season is in full swing and the Met has never felt more vibrant. Our current exhibitions take our visitors through the full span of history, telling the story of art as no other museum can.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: October 18

James Moske, Managing Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Monday, October 18, 2010

On October 18, 1880, Metropolitan Museum of Art Director Luigi Palma di Cesnola urged the Museum's Trustees to create an art library that would help fulfill the institution's educational mission. The Museum's original 1870 New York State charter had specifically committed the new institution to "establishing and maintaining . . . a museum and library of art."

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Mezzetin

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Jean Antoine Watteau's Mezzetin is among the Museum's most evocative works. Katharine Baetjer, curator in the Department of European Paintings, spoke with me about this small, striking painting.

Read More

Now at the Met

Khubilai Khan

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010

We have just opened a new show, The World of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty, one of the most complex and ambitious exhibitions ever mounted by the Metropolitan Museum. It is a true tour de force of scholarship and international collaboration, and it aims to cover every aspect of the arts and culture of China of the Yuan dynasty, one of the most dynamic and pivotal periods in Chinese history.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Roman Mosaic from Lod, Israel

Christopher S. Lightfoot, Curator, Department of Greek and Roman Art

Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010

In 1996 mosaics were accidentally uncovered during highway construction in the modern Israeli town of Lod, not far from Tel Aviv (see map). Lod is ancient Lydda, which was destroyed by the Romans in a.d. 66 during the Jewish War. Refounded by Hadrian as Diospolis, Lydda was awarded the rank of a Roman colony under Septimius Severus in a.d. 200.

Read More

Now at the Met

Between Here and There: Contemporary Photography at the Met

Douglas Eklund, Associate Curator, Department of Photographs

Posted: Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Inside the museum—not just the Met but any art museum—photography has been birthed in hallways. It began to spring from the shoulders of museums' print departments in the 1920s and 1930s, when modernism was making a case for photography as an independent art form. Over the decades it has spread institutionally through the in-between spaces that architecturally mirror the medium's proudly mongrel status as both art and not art.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: September 14

Barbara File, Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Tuesday, September 14, 2010

INDIA!, an exhibition of the art of India from the fourteenth through the nineteenth century, opened on this day in 1985 as part of a nationwide Festival of India jointly organized by the Government of India and the Indo-U.S. Sub-commission on Education and Culture.

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Armadillo-Shell Charango or Jarana

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Wednesday, September 1, 2010

On view in the Musical Instruments galleries is an arresting stringed object, an armadillo shell for its back. Ken Moore, the Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge of Musical Instruments, spoke with me about this work.

Read More

Now at the Met

New York City through Its People

Alex Hills, Former Online Marketing Coordinator, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, August 24, 2010

The current exhibition Hipsters, Hustlers, and Handball Players: Leon Levinstein's New York Photographs, 1950–1980 features candid photographs of New Yorkers, with each of Levinstein's subjects representing a particular neighborhood. In the thirty years since these photographs were taken, New York City's neighborhoods have changed dramatically: new buildings have appeared, businesses have opened or closed, and a new generation has moved in. What would Levinstein see in the people of New York today?

Read More

Now at the Met

Giovanni da Milano: Seeing with the Senses

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Monday, August 16, 2010

Two years ago I had the good fortune of being in Florence when, at the Accademia, which every tourist visits for its collection of sculpture by Michelangelo, there was a marvelous exhibition devoted to the great fourteenth-century painter Giovanni da Milano (Italian, Lombard, active 1346–69). I spent hours in the exhibition and it was there that I first saw Christ and Saint Peter; the Resurrection; Christ and Mary Magdalen.

Read More

Now at the Met

Teen T-Shirt Design Competition: And the Winners Are…

Alice W. Schwarz, Museum Educator

Posted: Friday, August 13, 2010

After days of viewing the entries and hours of narrowing the field, we have chosen four winners of the Teen T-Shirt Design Competition inspired by the special exhibition American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity.

Read More

Now at the Met

The Worldwide Met

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Wednesday, August 11, 2010

The Museum's Members just received their Summer Bulletin, which details the archaeological excavations in the ancient Near East that have been supported by the Metropolitan from 1931 to 2010. It reminds me that many people don't realize that the Met has been involved in the study of antiquity since the Museum's founding in 1870 (the Met's Egyptian Expedition began in 1906 and continued with extraordinary success for thirty years).

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Picasso's Seated Harlequin

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, August 10, 2010

The signature image of the exhibition Picasso in The Metropolitan Museum of Art (closing August 15) is the Seated Harlequin, a masterpiece painted by Picasso when he was just nineteen years old. Gary Tinterow, Engelhard Chairman of the Department of Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, spoke with me about the painting's imagery and style, as well as recent discoveries made by Metropolitan Museum conservators.

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Thursday, August 5, 2010

Among the gorgeous garments on display in the exhibition American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity (closing August 15) is an exquisite black evening dress attributed to Madame Marie Gerber of the house of Callot Soeurs. I spoke with Andrew Bolton, curator in the Met's Costume Institute, about the dress's bold design and glamorous, influential owner.

Read More

Now at the Met

Three Final Weeks for the Exhibitions Picasso and American Woman

Posted: Thursday, July 29, 2010

Summer visitors to the Met have only three more weeks—through Sunday, August 15—to view the popular exhibitions Picasso in The Metropolitan Museum of Art and American Woman: Fashioning a National Identity.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Visit to The Cloisters

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Tuesday, July 27, 2010

John D. Rockefeller Jr. once said, "I can think of nothing so unpleasant as a life devoted to pleasure." How extraordinary, then, that he would create perhaps the most idyllic retreat on the island of Manhattan: The Cloisters Museum and Gardens in Fort Tryon Park.

Read More

Now at the Met

Graduate Intern Gallery Talks: Perspectives from Scholars in Training

Ryan Wong, Former Administrative Assistant for Exhibitions, Office of the Director

Posted: Thursday, July 22, 2010

I recently posted an article about our twenty-two Summer College Interns (see "New Connections in the Permanent Collection"), and invited you to join us for one of our Highlight Tours or Special Topics Tours.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: July 19

Melissa Bowling, Associate Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Monday, July 19, 2010

One hundred years ago today, The Metropolitan Museum of Art opened the doors of its library's new home to art historians, students, and the general public.

Read More

Now at the Met

Four Extraordinary Sculptures Acquired and On View

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Friday, July 9, 2010

Each year, the Met holds four meetings at which curators present works of art to a special committee of Trustees for possible purchase by the Museum. It is a thoughtful and rigorous process, and it is always a thrill to see the acquired objects when they finally arrive in our galleries. This past year's purchases included four exquisite works of sculpture spanning from the ancient world to the mid-eighteenth century.

Read More

Now at the Met

Metropolitan Museum Reached 5.24 Million Annual Attendance, Highest Since 2001, at End of Fiscal Year

Posted: Thursday, July 1, 2010

Attendance at The Metropolitan Museum of Art reached 5,240,000 visitors during the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2010. This is the first year since 2001 that attendance at the Metropolitan exceeded five million. The number, which includes attendance at The Cloisters museum and gardens, ranks among the highest in its entire 130-year history.

Read More

Now at the Met

P.S. Art 2010 at the Met: Celebrating the Creativity of New York City Kids

Posted: Tuesday, June 29, 2010

Exceptional works of art by sixty-nine New York City public school students, ages four to twenty, are on view now through August 8 in the Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education through P.S. Art, a collaborative program between the New York City Department of Education and Studio in a School Association, Inc. This is the third consecutive year that the Met has hosted the juried exhibition, P.S. Art 2010: Celebrating the Creative Spirit of NYC Kids.

Read More

Now at the Met

Ringo Starr's Gold Drum on View at Met Museum

Posted: Tuesday, June 29, 2010

On July 7, Ringo Starr's seventieth birthday, The Metropolitan Museum of Art will inaugurate a special display of his gold-plated snare drum that will remain on view through December 2010 in the Museum's second-floor Musical Instruments Galleries. On loan from Ringo Starr, it was originally presented to him by the Ludwig Drum Company during The Beatles' 1964 visit to Chicago when the legendary rock group was on its first tour of the United States.

Read More

Now at the Met

Summer Interns: New Connections in the Permanent Collection

Ryan Wong, Former Administrative Assistant for Exhibitions, Office of the Director

Posted: Monday, June 28, 2010

When you visit the Met this summer, you will likely come across one of our twenty-two lilac-badged Summer College Interns—assisting visitors at one of the Information Desks (sometimes in a language other than English), lugging monographs out of Watson Library, or taking a break in the shade of Big Bambú. Or you may see us—and even join us—as we lead guided tours of the permanent collection.

Read More

Now at the Met

New Touch-Screen Labels for the American Wing Period Rooms

Amelia Peck, Marica F. Vilcek Curator of American Decorative Arts and Manager of the Henry R. Luce Center for the Study of American Art

Posted: Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Last May, when the seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and early nineteenth-century period rooms in the "old" American Wing building (1924) reopened after several years of renovation, visitors noticed many changes. Some were huge—we had removed several rooms and moved or replaced others—while some were more subtle, like the new lighting.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Day in the Life of an Art Librarian

Lisa Harms, Associate Manager for Circulation and Collections, Thomas J. Watson Library

Posted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010

During my weekly shifts at the reference desk at the Thomas J. Watson Library, I routinely get asked the same question by inquisitive Museum visitors who pass by our doors: "The Museum has a library?" Over the years, I have learned to treat this as an opportunity to promote the library's collection, services, and resources.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: June 12

James Moske, Managing Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Saturday, June 12, 2010

Eighty-five years ago today, on June 12, 1925, The Metropolitan Museum of Art purchased a collection of medieval sculpture and architectural fragments from George Grey Barnard (1863–1938), a prominent American sculptor and collector. This acquisition formed the nucleus of what would become The Cloisters, the branch of the Museum located in Northern Manhattan and devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Picasso Lost . . . And Found

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Eight curators, five conservators, five research scientists, and eight researchers worked together for nearly a year to create our current exhibition Picasso in The Metropolitan Museum of Art and its accompanying catalogue, shedding new light on a subject that one might think had been completely exhausted. Their work revealed many important discoveries, but perhaps none more compelling than the identification of a long-lost painting by the master.

Read More

Now at the Met

Contemporary Aboriginal Painting from Australia

Eric Kjellgren, Evelyn A. J. Hall and John A. Friede Associate Curator for Oceanic Art, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

Posted: Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Ever since its inception in the early 1970s, the contemporary Aboriginal art movement in Australia has been continually developing and expanding to embrace an ever widening group of artists, communities, and artistic styles.

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Mastering the Art of Chinese Painting

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, May 11, 2010

The exhibition Mastering the Art of Chinese Painting: Xie Zhiliu (1910–1997) showcases a rich body of material that offers a rare glimpse into the creative process of a traditional Chinese artist. I spoke with Maxwell K. Hearn, Douglas Dillon Curator in the Museum's Department of Asian Art, about Hosta and Asters, one of the many stunning works on view.

Read More

Now at the Met

Family Concert: Dan Zanes & Friends

Lisa Musco Doyle, Senior Manager, Concerts & Lectures

Posted: Tuesday, May 4, 2010

As the Senior Manager for Concerts & Lectures at the Met I am extremely proud of our ability to present amazing programs each year. While many of our readers are familiar with the Museum's program of scholarly lectures, some of you may not realize that the Met also has a long tradition of presenting musical events, including special programs just for families.

Read More

Now at the Met

Calling All Fashion and Design Mavens!

Alice W. Schwarz, Museum Educator

Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010

What do you get when you mix a groundbreaking exhibition, a cutting-edge curatorial team, two enthusiastic Museum educators, and a great American fashion company? A T-shirt design competition for teens!

Read More

Now at the Met

Surface Tension

Mia Fineman, Assistant Curator, Department of Photographs

Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Live snakes, talcum powder, cassette tapes, dust. These are a few of the unusual materials used to create the photographs currently on view in Surface Tension: Contemporary Photographs from the Collection. For many artists today, the process of making a photograph involves much more than just pointing a camera and clicking the shutter. In fact, a number of photographs in this exhibition didn't involve a camera at all.

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Head of Tutankhamun

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Wednesday, April 21, 2010

This beautiful sculpture, a representation of the boy-king Tutankhamun, is among the nearly sixty objects featured in the current exhibition Tutankhamun's Funeral. I spoke with Dorothea Arnold, the Lila Acheson Wallace Chairman of the Department of Egyptian Art, about the significance and style of this work.

Read More

Now at the Met

Today in Met History: April 13

James Moske, Managing Archivist, Museum Archives

Posted: Tuesday, April 13, 2010

One hundred forty years ago today, on April 13, 1870, the Legislature of the State of New York granted an act of incorporation that formally established The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The new institution was charged with "encouraging and developing the study of the fine arts, and the application of the arts to manufacture and practical life, of advancing general knowledge of kindred subjects, and, to that end, furnishing popular instruction and recreation."

Read More

Now at the Met

The Packard Collection at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Sinéad Vilbar, Assistant Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Friday, April 9, 2010

By all accounts, Harry C. G. Packard (1914–1991) was no ordinary collector. He is known to have crisscrossed the United States multiple times in order to sell works of Japanese art, only to return to Japan to purchase more. He had a most unusual vision; whereas the majority of collectors, scholars, and dealers tend to focus on a particular area or medium, Packard’s ambitions were more encyclopedic, not unlike that of the Met.

Read More

Now at the Met

Medieval Blogging

Wendy Stein, Research Associate, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Posted: Tuesday, April 6, 2010

We are just a little over a month into the run of The Art of Illumination—the exhibition with the impossibly long subtitle: The Limbourg Brothers and the Belles Heures of Jean de France, Duc de Berry. Come see it if you haven't already—or if you have, but couldn't get a turn with one of the magnifying glasses we have provided, come back to see the astounding detail in these magical little pictures.

Read More

Now at the Met

Artemisia Gentileschi's Esther Before Ahasuerus

Keith Christiansen, John Pope-Hennessy Chairman, Department of European Paintings

Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010

Each time I stand before this painting I am impressed by the clever way the artist—the most famous female painter of the seventeenth century—has infused a well-known biblical story with her understanding of a gendered society in which women employed beauty and cleverness to gain the upper hand.

Read More

Now at the Met

Playing with Pictures

Malcolm Daniel, Senior Curator, Department of Photographs

Posted: Monday, March 22, 2010

Most often, our special exhibitions highlight important aspects of the Met's collection or explore areas of curatorial expertise, but occasionally they give us the chance, instead, to present a type of work that's entirely absent from the collection. Playing with Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage is one such instance.

Read More

Now at the Met

March Curator Interview

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, March 16, 2010

In honor of Women's History Month, I recently spoke with Rebecca Rabinow, associate curator in the Department of Nineteenth-Century, Modern, and Contemporary Art, about The Horse Fair, a monumental painting by Rosa Bonheur (French, 1822–1899). Bonheur was among the most successful female artists of the nineteenth century.

Read More

Now at the Met

Musical Instruments and More

Ken Moore, Frederick P. Rose Curator in Charge, Department of Musical Instruments

Posted: Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Last Tuesday, we unlocked the doors of the Musical Instruments galleries, which had been closed for an eight-month hiatus while roof work was performed on the American Wing side of our galleries. During that time we refreshed the appearance of the European instrument gallery. A new paint job, better internal case lighting, reframed case doors, and a redefined arrangement of the display now offers our visitors an enhanced experience of the instruments.

Read More

Now at the Met

Bronzino Masterpiece Joins Landmark Exhibition of the Artist's Drawings

Posted: Friday, March 5, 2010

A major work by the great Florentine artist Agnolo Bronzino (1503-1572) has just been installed in the landmark exhibition now in progress, The Drawings of Bronzino (on view through April 18, 2010).

Read More

Now at the Met

Contemplations on the Moon Jar

Soyoung Lee, Associate Curator, Department of Asian Art

Posted: Wednesday, March 3, 2010

When I first saw 25 Wishes (above, left) in the Chelsea studio of the artist Ik-joong Kang nearly a year ago, my first thought was how wonderful it would look in the Met's Korean gallery.

Read More

Now at the Met

Musical Instruments Galleries Reopen Today

Posted: Tuesday, March 2, 2010

After an eight-month hiatus, The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments reopen today. They feature a refreshed and reinstalled presentation of the Museum's renowned collection of Western musical instruments that showcases more than 230 works.

Read More

Now at the Met

From Quarry to Sculpture: Understanding Provenance, Typologies, and Uses of Khmer Stones

Federico Carò, Associate Research Scientist, Department of Scientific Research

Posted: Thursday, February 25, 2010

The substantial collection of Khmer art at the Met comprises pre-Angkor and Angkor freestanding sculptures and architectural elements from Cambodia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Like the works gathered in Phnom Penh at the National Museum of Cambodia and in Paris at the Musée Guimet, these works illustrate the birth and evolution of the different Khmer styles and record changes in the sculptural artistic medium through time and across geographical areas (see map and timeline).

Read More

Now at the Met

Museum Education and the Web

William B. Crow, Managing Museum Educator, School and Teacher Programs

Posted: Tuesday, February 23, 2010

When I'm not teaching adults or students in the galleries of the Museum, I develop, plan, and oversee workshops for K–12 teachers designed to introduce educators (and, thus, their students) to great works of art through object-based learning, interdisciplinary integration, and inquiry.

Read More

Now at the Met

Important Antiquities Lent by Republic of Italy on View at Metropolitan Museum

Posted: Friday, February 19, 2010

A rare, recently excavated ancient Roman dining set consisting of twenty silver objects—one of only three such sets from the region of Pompeii known to exist in the world—and an important ancient Greek kylix (or drinking cup) have been installed in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Galleries for Greek and Roman Art as part of an ongoing exchange of antiquities between the Republic of Italy and the Museum.

Read More

Now at the Met

Family Programs at the Met: "How Did They Do That?"

Mike Norris, Museum Educator

Posted: Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Every year, the Met welcomes close to twenty thousand family members who participate in more than five hundred special activities. But we didn't always have such a large family audience.

Read More

Now at the Met

Doug + Mike Starn on the Roof: Big Bambú

Posted: Friday, February 12, 2010

American artists Mike and Doug Starn (born 1961) have been invited by The Metropolitan Museum of Art to create a site-specific installation for The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, opening to the public on April 27, 2010.

Read More

Now at the Met

Curator Interview: Romare Bearden's The Block

Jennette Mullaney, Former Associate Email Marketing Manager, Digital Media

Posted: Tuesday, February 9, 2010

As the editor of the monthly email newsletter Met News, I have the pleasure of interviewing curators and other experts about works of art from the Museum's collections. More than 113,000 subscribers already receive Met News, but I'm happy to be able to include selected interviews here for an even wider audience.

Read More

Now at the Met

Daguerreotype Masterpiece Acquired by the Met

Posted: Friday, February 5, 2010

A daguerreotype by Baron Jean-Baptiste Louis Gros—a work of extraordinary quality and rarity—has been acquired by the Metropolitan Museum.  Both a depiction and a demonstration of what the medium was capable of at its high point in 1850s Paris, The Salon of Baron Gros shows the interior of a mid-nineteenth-century parlor believed to be that of the baron, with light streaming in from a window at left.

Read More

Now at the Met

Iconic Fashions from Costume Institute Set the Bar High on Project Runway

Posted: Friday, February 5, 2010

Project Runway, the reality television series about fashion design, visited the Met during an episode entitled "The Highs and Lows of Fashion," which debuted on January 28, 2010.

Read More

Now at the Met

Behind the Scenes: The Department of Scientific Research

Marco Leona, David H. Koch Scientist in Charge, Department of Scientific Research

Posted: Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Many visitors may not realize that the Museum's staff includes ten scientists, with backgrounds in chemistry, biology, geology, or engineering. As part of the Department of Scientific Research, we study the materials and the technologies that were used in creating works of art, and we collaborate with curators and conservators on art historical studies, conservation research, and conservation treatments.

Read More

Now at the Met

Alexander McQueen’s Iconic Designs to be Celebrated in a Spring 2011 Costume Institute Retrospective

Posted: Monday, February 1, 2010

The Museum announced today that the spring 2011 Costume Institute exhibition will be Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty. The exhibition, on view May 4–July 31, 2011, will celebrate the late Mr. McQueen's extraordinary contributions to fashion.

Read More

Now at the Met

Sunday at the Met: Legends and True Stories

Joseph Loh, Managing Museum Educator, Public and Exhibition Programs

Posted: Friday, January 29, 2010

As the educator responsible for the Sunday at the Met lecture series, I plan about twenty to twenty-five different events a year. The programs usually include one or two talks, and may also feature a film or a demonstration. They are often held in conjunction with a current exhibition, a special theme, or an interesting connection to the Museum's vast permanent collection. My job is much like that of a Broadway producer, director, travel agent, and stagehand all rolled into one. Even though it's a lot of work, I wouldn't trade it for anything! I'm lucky that there are many talented people throughout the Museum who help out.

Read More

Now at the Met

A Look Back at American Stories

Katie Steiner, Research Assistant, Department of American Paintings and Sculpture

Posted: Friday, January 29, 2010

Over the past four months, I have been writing posts and responding to comments on a blog dedicated to the special exhibition American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915. The exhibition closed last Sunday, but both the blog and a special feature will remain online for those who'd like to revisit the more than one hundred iconic paintings that were included in galleries.

Read More

Now at the Met

Messerschmidt Bust Enters the Collection

Posted: Friday, January 29, 2010

Earlier this month, the Met acquired its first work by Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (1736–1783), the Austrian sculptor best known for his series of character heads, which are physiognomic and psychological studies.

Read More

Now at the Met

Welcome Post

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO

Posted: Friday, January 29, 2010

We've heard from many of you that you enjoy this website and find it to be an exciting, in-depth access point into the Museum's collections, exhibitions, programs, and research. But we've also heard that you would appreciate a single page where you can sample what's on at the Museum right now and what our experts are working on behind the scenes.

Read More

Results per page
Follow This Blog: Subscribe

About this Blog

Now at the Met offers in-depth articles and multimedia features about the Museum's current exhibitions, events, research, announcements, behind-the-scenes activities, and more.