Exhibitions/ Art Object
{{img.publicCaption}}

Hotei

Artist:
Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716)
Period:
Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:
after 1704
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
Dimensions:
Image: 11 1/4 × 14 1/2 in. (28.5 × 36.8 cm) Overall with mounting: 42 1/2 × 26 9/16 in. (108 × 67.4 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015
Accession Number:
2015.300.89
Not on view
Hotei (Chinese: Budai) is one of the most beloved characters of Zen Buddhism and is believed to be an avatar of Maitreya, the Buddha of the Future. Potbellied with a shaven head, this cheerful, blissful monk is said to have roamed the countryside in the late ninth to early tenth century in the area of Mount Siming, in southern China, carrying his few belongings in a patched cloth bag.

Hotei was probably first portrayed in painting soon after his death and later entered the folklore of China and Japan as one of the Seven Gods of Good Fortune (Shichi fukujin). In his ink paintings of august East Asian mythological and historical personages, Ogata Kōrin often portrayed the seven gods in a more playful aspect, as seen here.
Believed to be an avatar of Maitreya, the Buddha of the Future, Hotei (Ch: Budai) is one of the most beloved characters of Zen Buddhism.[1] Potbellied and bald, this cheerful, blissful man roamed the countryside in the late ninth-early tenth century in the area of Mount Si-ming, in southern China, carrying his few belongings in a patched cloth bag. Hotei was probably portrayed in painting soon after his death, and later entered the folklore of China and Japan as one of the Shichifukujin (Seven Gods of Good Fortune). Beginning in the Muromachi period, the deity was depicted by innumerable artists, regardless of their religious inclination.

Kōrin's paintings of Chinese mythological and historical personages usually differ from conventional interpretations in that he often transforms them into humorous characters. He made many ink drawings of Hotei in unorthodox poses—bouncing on his bag while kicking a ball skyward or riding a wild horse, for example, activities that perhaps express his divesting himself of worldly attachments.[2] Here, Hotei is shown leaning against the bag, his constant companion. Merging with Hotei, it can easily be mistaken for the deity's potbelly. Grinning, Hotei seems amused by this cunning deception of the unsuspecting viewer. The bag, drawn in light ink, contrasts with the four patches of pitch-black ink that denote Hotei's two sleeves and the tip and base of the pole on which he carries his bag. Kōrin here loaded the brush with dark ink and, turning it on its side to form two broad strokes, "wrote" the sleeves.

The square "Dōsu" seal is impressed below Kōrin's signature. Adopted in 1704, the name can be used to date the drawing to the last dozen years of his life.[3]

[Miyeko Murase 2000, Bridge of Dreams]

[1] Chapin 1933, pp. 47–52.
[2] Murashige Yasushi 1991, figs. 157–62.
[3] Tanaka Ichimatsu 1961b, p. 27.
Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation , New York (until 2015; donated to MMA)
Tokyo National Museum. "Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: nyūyōku bāku korekushon," May 21, 1985–June 30, 1985.

Ishikawa Prefectural Museum. "Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: nyūyōku bāku korekushon," July 13, 1985–August 11, 1985.

Nagoya City Art Museum. "Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: nyūyōku bāku korekushon," August 17, 1985–September 23, 1985.

Atami. MOA Museum of Art. "Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: nyūyōku bāku korekushon," September 29, 1985–October 27, 1985.

Hamamatsu City Museum of Art. "Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: nyūyōku bāku korekushon," November 12, 1985–December 1, 1985.

New York. Asia Society. "Art of Japan: Selections from the Burke Collection, pts. I and II," October 2, 1986–February 22, 1987.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Masterpieces of Japanese Art from The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," March 30, 2000–June 25, 2000.

Museum of Fine Arts, Gifu. "Enduring Legacy of Japanese Art: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," July 5, 2005–August 19, 2005.

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum. "Enduring Legacy of Japanese Art: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," October 4, 2005–December 11, 2005.

Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. "Enduring Legacy of Japanese Art: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," January 24, 2006–March 5, 2006.

Miho Museum. "Enduring Legacy of Japanese Art: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," March 15, 2006–June 11, 2006.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art," May 26, 2012–January 13, 2013.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Celebrating the Arts of Japan: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection," October 20, 2015–January 22, 2017.

Uemura Masurō. Kōrin. Tokyo: Takamizawa Mokuhansha, 1940, fig. 110.

Tanaka Ichimatsu, ed. Kōrin (The art of Kōrin). Rev. ed. Tokyo: Nihon Keizai Shinbunsha, 1956, fig. 42.

Shimada Shūjirō, ed. Zaigai hihō: Ōbei shūzō Nihon kaiga shūsei (Japanese paintings in Western collections). Vol. 2, Shōbyōga, Rinpa, bunjinga (Screen paintings, rinpa, and literati painting). Tokyo: Gakushū Kenkyūsha, 1969, p. 81.

Murase, Miyeko. Japanese Art: Selections from the Mary and Jackson Burke Collection. Exh. cat. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1975, cat. no. 55.

Tokyo National Museum. Nihon bijutsu meihin ten: New York Burke Collection / A Selection of Japanese Art from the Mary and Jackson Burke Collection. Exh. cat. Tokyo: Chunichi Shimbun, 1985, cat. no. 44.

Avitabile, Gunhild, ed. Die Kunst des alten Japan: Meisterwerke aus der Mary and Jackson Burke Collection, New York. Exh. cat. Frankfurt: Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, 1990, cat. no. 58.

Murashige Yasushi, ed. Rinpa. Vol. 4, Jinbutsu (Scenes from literature, people). Kyoto: Shikōsha, 1992, fig. 162.

Murase, Miyeko. Bridge of Dreams: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection of Japanese Art. Exh. cat. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000, cat. no. 133.

Tsuji Nobuo et al. Nyūyōku Bāku korekushon-ten: Nihon no bi sanzennen no kagayaki / Enduring Legacy of Japanese Art: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection. Exh. cat., Museum of Fine Arts, Gifu; Hiroshima Prefectural Museum of Art; Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum; and Miho Museum, Shigaraki, Shiga Prefecture. [Tokyo]: Nihon Keizai Shinbunsha, 2005, cat. no. 92.

Carpenter, John T. Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art. Exh. cat. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012, cat. no. 26.
Related Objects

Coal container

Artist: School of Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Date: 18th century Medium: Wood, metal, mother-of-pearl, lacquer Accession: 51.132.1a, b On view in:Not on view

Writing Box (Suzuribako) with Woodcutter

Artist: Attributed to Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Date: 19th century Medium: Black and gold lacquer on wood with gold maki-e and mother-of-pearl inlay Accession: 58.169a, b On view in:Not on view

Box with Design of Maple Tree and Deer

Artist: Style of Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Date: 19th century Medium: Gold inlaid with mother-of-pearl and tin Accession: 29.100.697 On view in:Not on view

Case (Inrō) with Design of Maple Tree and Stream

Artist: In the style of Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Date: 18th–19th century Medium: Gold lacquer with dark gray ishime, gold, red, black, and silver makie, pewter, and mother-of-pearl; Ojime: bead with autumn wild flowers; Netsuke: rat eating peach; boxwood Accession: 91.1.701 On view in:Not on view

Inrō with Crane and Plum Tree

Artist: Style of Ogata Kōrin (Japanese, 1658–1716) Date: 19th century Medium: Gold lacquer ground with mother-of-pearl and pewter inlay Netsuke: fish on wheels; carved wood Ojime: vajra (thunderbolt); metal Accession: 29.82.2 On view in:Not on view