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Teen Blog

What Does One Do with a Wall Full of Feathers?

Sage, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, October 31, 2013

Many questions surround the beautiful feather panels, created between about 600 and 1000 by the Wari peoples of Peru, that are currently on view in the exhibition Feathered Walls: Hangings from Ancient Peru. The simplistic juxtapositions of color and painstaking care put into them tantalize the mind and make one wonder what purpose the panels served.

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Teen Blog

A New Perspective on an Ancient Object

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, October 24, 2013

As a preface, I would just like to ask that you not take my excitement about the work above to be some kind of authoritative perspective on it—in other words, that you'll visit the Museum, see this piece and have a great, transcendent epiphany with the swelling baritone of a hallelujah chorus behind you. Perhaps it's just me being overzealous and getting unnecessarily pumped up about something as usual. But, for a second, let's be indulgent and allow me to express how this piece requires you to reconfigure your mind, and just how weird and interesting it is. Let's break it down for a second, shall we?

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Teen Blog

Chodhisone: Our 3D Creation in Plastic

Sage, TAG Member; and Katy, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The idea for our 3D sculpture came together after taking pictures of a Chinese chimera and a bodhisattva from the Asian Art galleries, along with Ritual Seat for a Noble (Osa' osa), currently on view in the Met's Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas galleries. From there, we took each of the photos and stitched them together using 3D printing software.

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Teen Blog

Monster in a Monster

Angeles, TAG Member; and Briana, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2013

The inspiration for our 3D scanning and printing workshop project came from our mutual interest in both Asian and Greek mythology. Although we came across many potential subjects while getting to know the Museum's collection, we quickly decided to base our plastic sculpture on Greek mythological figures and Buddhist deities—combining animal and human forms to create a supernatural god.

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Teen Blog

Our Untitled 3D Sculpture

Sumura, TAG Member; and Matthew, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Monday, September 30, 2013

Before beginning the design process for our 3D sculpture, we were both inspired by three different sculptures currently on view at the Met: Lectern for the Reading of the Gospels with the Eagle of Saint John the Evangelist in the Medieval Sculpture Hall; Statue of the Goddess Sakhmet from the Egyptian Art collection; and Mourning Victory from the Melvin Memorial in the Charles Engelhard Court of The American Wing. With all of the artwork the Museum has to offer, it definitely seemed like choosing a subject to work with would be the most challenging part—but then the printing process began.

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Teen Blog

Pax Santi

Brooke, TAG Member; and Veronika, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2013

As we walked through each gallery of the Met in order to determine the subject for our 3D sculpture, we were immediately inspired by the tranquility of Buddha Preaching the First Sermon at Sarnath in the Asian Art galleries. However, we were also intrigued by the fierceness of the Greek and Roman marble sculptures on display, and elected to combine both the head of the Roman Emperor Hadrian—currently on loan to the Museum—with the body of a lion.

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Teen Blog

Cleo and Her Friends

Alison, Teen Program Participant; and Nathaniel, Teen Program Participant

Posted: Friday, August 30, 2013

This past July, we and eight other high school students participated in the Metropolitan Museum's first 3D scanning and printing workshop for teens. During the weeklong intensive, we were introduced to the Met's collections of Asian, American, Oceanian, ancient Egyptian, and Roman art, and we then used specialized printers to convert photographs of some of these objects into 3D models.

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Teen Blog

Lollipop Trees on Concrete Tiles

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2013

What happened here? Did someone spill paint on these tiles? Is this supposed to be blood? Is there blood all over the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art?!

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Teen Blog

The Unexpected Humanity of the Roof Garden Commission

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 8, 2013

Upon first seeing Imran Qureshi's installation on the Museum's roof garden, I was immediately struck by how effectively it subverts one's expectations. Along with the rest of the Teen Advisory Group, I was simply informed that we would be visiting a "rooftop installation," which immediately brought to mind the kind of monolithic modernist sculpture that seems to be increasingly ubiquitous in outdoor art installations these days. Surprisingly, though, we were greeted with something much more subtle and thought-provoking.

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Teen Blog

The Poppy Field on the Rooftop

Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, August 1, 2013

Sudden violence in the United States, especially when unpredictable, triggers an immediate and mass reaction. This is hardly so in the case of Pakistan, however, a country where violence is the norm and not the exception. At the Museum's roof garden this summer, contemporary Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi challenges American viewers to immerse themselves in the bloodbath of civilians killed in sectarian conflicts far away from our own shores.

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Teen Blog

The Dividing Line

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 26, 2013

Imran Qureshi's installation on the Met's roof is abrupt. Looking across the roof, one is confronted by something of a geological layering. In the foreground, violence and bloodshed come to mind, and behind, the Met's stone superstructure separates you from the immediacy of Central Park's seemingly dense forests. Looking down at your feet, your confidence is partially shattered by the realization that you are walking on paint. Instinctively, my feet searched for an oasis of untainted stone.

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Teen Blog

Crossing Borders

Shivanna, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 19, 2013

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden at the Metropolitan Museum is a magnificent place to exhibit art high above Central Park. You have the warm sun, the sounds of nature, the clear blue sky, the green foliage, and a breathtaking view of the concrete jungle around you. Walking out onto the roof recently, I expected to see an immense sculpture. Instead, I was greeted by Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi's painted installation.

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Teen Blog

The Irony of Punk

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 12, 2013

I learned from visiting PUNK: Chaos to Couture that punk was an ironic movement and that its irony has contributed to its staying power. When punk started in the mid-1970s, it was dealing with a social landscape that had lost sight of its goals. The hippies said they wanted a revolution, but changing the world is not a passive exercise. That's where the punks came in.

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Teen Blog

Deconstructing Madame X

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, July 5, 2013

In my drawing at left, I wanted to create a visual response of sorts to what I saw in PUNK: Chaos to Couture, namely the D.I.Y.: Hardware gallery.

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Teen Blog

Punk Undercover

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Monday, July 1, 2013

Shhhh! The dresses in the D.I.Y.: Hardware gallery in PUNK: Chaos to Couture are punk undercover. In contrast to the more obviously punk shirts, pants, trash-bag dresses, and tie-dye ball gowns in the rest of the exhibition, these clothes are not necessarily meant to be punk. It is obvious, however, that they are indeed influenced by punk style.

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Teen Blog

Redefining Garbage with Bricolage

Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Friday, June 21, 2013

The punk aesthetic of the 1970s, its underground survival throughout the 1980s, and its high-fashion revival in the 1990s have profoundly shaped what it means to be a rebellious youth. To be punk means to express one's disillusionment with the status quo and to challenge it.

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Teen Blog

Punk Meant Anything

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013

When I walked into the Metropolitan Museum's PUNK: Chaos to Couture exhibition, I was not expecting big-name designers. Punk was supposedly a movement for nobody and nothing, wasn’t it? However, upon walking into the exhibition's catacomb of glorified dissension, replete with pieces from Galliano, Dolce and Gabbana, and Prada, I soon realized that the designer clothes on display are a testament to punk's power. I didn't used to associate names like Versace and Dior with crusty-shirted tribalism and deconstructionism, but punk has so changed the landscape for artistic expression that Givenchy and Johnny Rotten can now coexist happily in the same place.

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Teen Blog

Licked: The Academic Ideal

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, June 3, 2013

Impressionist paintings are so beautiful, emotional, and colorful, yet in the nineteenth century, they were considered laughable; at the time, people favored meticulously realistic, "licked" paintings over the Impressionists' "broken brushstrokes." The term "licked" refers to paintings that shine like someone has licked them to even out any trace of brushstrokes, and "broken brushstrokes" refers to thick dabs of paint on a canvas.

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Teen Blog

Skill versus Judgment

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Okay, now don't get me wrong. While I'm sort of presenting the following ideas as fact, I don't claim to know much about painting or anything about Impressionism, but I am completely fascinated with the movement—actually head over heels infatuated. I want more than anything to understand how it works, so please forgive the following inelegant suppositions as the workings of a mind tussling with understanding.

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Teen Blog

Sigh

Evelin, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2013

It's been a long day. You've been knocked around a couple of times. You sit down, and your eyes slowly begin to close. It's time to breathe a sigh of relief, take a break, and transport yourself to a different, more peaceful place. Two works by the Impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840–1926) allow you to do just that.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.