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Teen Blog

Transitory Elegance

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Sweet, elegant, loving, beauty: these are the words that come to mind when I look at Springtime by Pierre-Auguste Cot. After hearing one of our amazing educators, Kathy Galitz, speak about it, though, I have a new feeling about what this and the other pieces in gallery 827 represent.

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Teen Blog

First Impressions (Sorry, I Had To)

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013

The Teen Advisory Group recently set out to learn about Impressionist art. Captained by Associate Museum Educator Kathy Galitz, we actually began our journey not with Impressionist art itself but with a brief exposé on what is lovingly referred to as "academic" art. Yes, academic.

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Teen Blog

Photographer as Subject

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, May 2, 2013

Sometimes, in discrete moments of boredom-induced reflection, I begin to think about why certain things have survived from the past and others haven't. I wonder whether it is through sheer dumb luck that some artworks are preserved while others are lost, and whether the creators of the surviving works had any idea that their work would last for so long and be seen by so many eyes.

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Teen Blog

When Sitting on a Porch Means So Much More

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, April 22, 2013

Curator Jeff L. Rosenheim recently spoke to the Teen Advisory Group about the current exhibition Photography and the American Civil War. As part of his talk, he showed us an 1864 photograph of Union soldiers posing on the front steps of Robert E. Lee's Virginia home, which the government had confiscated in 1861.

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Teen Blog

Historical Photographs: Windows into the Past

Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2013

Photographs play an important role in history by documenting moments in time. When people look at historical photographs, they are able to peer into worlds they previously could only imagine.

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Teen Blog

Curiosity Carries Within

Evelin, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Seeing the work of Henri Matisse—the French artist who experimented with different methods such as painting, printmaking, and sculpture—makes me want to know more about art in general.

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Teen Blog

Salvador Dalí

Theo, High School Intern

Posted: Wednesday, March 27, 2013

My family has a penchant for strolling through museums. I've appreciated this more as I've gotten older, but as a kid I got bored easily. Pausing before a piece by Salvador Dalí was always an incredible relief, and I came to crave the fluid style and disturbing clutter of his work.

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Teen Blog

A Painting as an Experience

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Monday, March 18, 2013

"A painting is not a picture of an experience; it is an experience." –Mark Rothko

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Teen Blog

A Comfortable Position

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Wednesday, March 13, 2013

The Teen Advisory Group recently visited the Museum's permanent collection of modern and contemporary art to talk about the work of Henri Matisse. Our guest speaker, Met lecturer Deborah A. Goldberg, PhD, asked, "What do you first think of when you think of Matisse?" There was a great variety of answers.

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Teen Blog

Non Finito

Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2013

In our recent tour through the Met's galleries with lecturer Deborah A. Goldberg, we looked at Henri Matisse's paintings and Fauvist works by other artists that incorporate techniques such as mixing an enormous array of colors. Although my brain is still processing the information, one of Matisse's methods particularly stood out to me. It's called "non finito."

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Teen Blog

Perspective

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, February 26, 2013

How many times has the word "perspective" appeared when referring to one's impression of, well, any artwork or art gallery? "Perspective" is like the bacon of art vocabulary; you sprinkle it over any conversation and it can spark a delicious array of reactions. In my experience, abstract art produces the most varied responses.

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Teen Blog

Passport to Another World

Shivanna, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013

When you enter the Met, you leave the buzzing streets of Manhattan behind and are transported back in time and to foreign places. As an artist, intern, frequent Met visitor, and New Yorker, I can say the Met is my favorite place to "vacation" when I need to get away from the bustling world outside.

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Teen Blog

Listening to Art

Julia, High School Intern

Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2013

I'll admit it. There are some pieces in the Met's collection that I am very tempted to touch—the smooth, cold sculptures, for instance, and paint globs that dry seemingly inches off the canvas. It's due in part to this inclination that I enjoy visiting the Musical Instruments galleries so much.

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Teen Blog

A Rectangular-Shaped Surprise in the Greek and Roman Art Galleries

Julia, High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013

When I think of the Greek and Roman Art galleries, the first color that comes to mind is white, thanks to the slick marble statues that fill the courtyards and halls with both a sense of calm and a buzzing chit-chatter. So I am always somewhat surprised and very delighted to stop in on this primarily black fresco. I love that it seems to be at odds with almost every other piece in the collection.

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Teen Blog

Special (Little) Exhibitions

Julia, High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Have a favorite nook at the Met? A quiet space where you can truly be alone with the pieces? Whether your answer to this question is "yes" or "no," I suggest you explore the smaller special exhibitions scattered throughout the Metropolitan Museum.

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Teen Blog

Let's See Some Stuff

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, January 23, 2013

My first introduction to the Metropolitan Museum was through a portfolio drawing class I took in 2010. I think it would be fair to say that the course was the reason I stuck around as a member of the Teen Advisory Group, and thus the reason I'm writing this blog post today.

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Teen Blog

What is Art?

Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, January 14, 2013

Is art merely the "imitation of the good," as the ancient Greek philosopher Plato wrote in his Republic, or the "lie that makes us realize truth," as the Spanish artist Picasso contended? Does art serve a utilitarian, religious, or aesthetic purpose, or no purpose at all?

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Teen Blog

A Saturday Afternoon at the Met

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Many teens already make a habit out of visiting the Metropolitan Museum, but I thought I should let our blog readers know about a teen program I think they would really enjoy. One Saturday each month, the Met offers a class called Saturday Sketching for visitors ages 11 through 18. I've been attending these tranquil drawing sessions for some time now, and I have enjoyed meeting new friends and catching up with the old ones who frequently come to the class.

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Teen Blog

The Ostentatiously Weird and Elegantly Beautiful, Part 2: The Sum of Its Parts

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Friday, December 28, 2012

Last week, I left you with the promise that I would discuss Leap into the Void in greater detail, and I certainly don't intend to disappoint you now. Without further ado, I would like to present the second of two photographs in the exhibition Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop that I found particularly striking.

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Teen Blog

The Ostentatiously Weird and Elegantly Beautiful, Part 1: Please Pardon the Unidentified Flying Object

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Thursday, December 20, 2012

Let's consider these two images aesthetically, as visual matter to be both analytically dissected and emotionally felt.

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Teen Blog

It's about Sex

Genevieve, TAG Member; and Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Photoshop is a relatively new program that allows people to manipulate images digitally. However, artists began manipulating images long before Photoshop came to be.

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Teen Blog

The Spooky Figures behind the Black-and-White Stills

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Among the humorous, tragic, beautiful, and controversial photographs found in the current exhibition Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop, you will find disappearing people, questionable "others," ghostlike figures, and possible spirits. By using various methods of manipulation such as the combining of several negatives into one cohesive piece, mid-nineteenth-century photographers were able to make these spooky images.

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Teen Blog

Finding Enlightenment in the Japanese Wing

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member; and Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 27, 2012

According to Joseph Loh, a Museum educator specializing in Japanese art, the ideal time to see cherry blossoms is not when they are most bountiful, nor when the flowers have peaked at full bloom, but rather as the flowers begin to fall and inevitably die. It is the melancholy nature, he says, that makes this event so spectacular because it can only be witnessed once each year.

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Teen Blog

Nothing Lasts Forever

Mayra, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2012

In western society, people don't really notice the transition between seasons until it has already taken place. Artworks painted in the Japanese Rinpa style, by contrast, highlight a cultural focus on the seasons through natural imagery, vibrant colors, and connections to literature. This fall, in the exhibition Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art, Ogata Kenzan's Autumn Ivy shows us how much one can appreciate nature through observation and reflection.

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Teen Blog

Personal Responses to Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member; and Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2012

This week, we have chosen to present our personal responses to the exhibition Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art. Dan has written a poem inspired by several examples of poetry in the exhibition, and Kristen has created a collage inspired by images of cherry blossoms.

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Teen Blog

Literature, Love, and Art

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Monday, November 5, 2012

Visitors come to the Metropolitan Museum expecting to be immersed in beautiful art from various eras. Whether they're looking for a particular piece or intending to stroll casually through the galleries, they might be surprised to get wrapped up in a story.

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Teen Blog

The Spirit Within

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member; Ethan, TAG Member; and Tiffany, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012

Walking through the dimly lit halls of the Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia inspires a true sense of wonder. "Where did this all come from?" one might ask. "This doesn't seem like the Islamic world I know today." In many ways, it isn't.

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Teen Blog

Function over Form

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member; and Karl, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, October 15, 2012

At the first TAG meeting of the year, we chose to explore the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. We were particularly struck by one object, which we want to share with you.

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Teen Blog

Floors!

Evelin, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Let us introduce you to our favorite place in the Metropolitan Museum: the Greek and Roman Art galleries.

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Teen Blog

Fairytale or Mystery?

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern; Garrett, TAG Member; and Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012

We started our first Teen Advisory Group meeting of the 2012–13 school year with the question "If you were a book, would you rather be a fairytale or a mystery?" When we were asked to write a blog post introducing other teenagers to our favorite galleries at the Metropolitan Museum, that question stuck in our minds. We invite you to read the following tale about three knights who found themselves in the Museum's Galleries for 19th- and Early 20th-Century European Paintings and Sculpture.

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Teen Blog

A Venture for the Makers: Summer Art and Film Intensive 2012

Maleficent Twemlow (a.k.a. Anna), TAG Member

Posted: Monday, September 24, 2012

As a disclaimer, I don't know how efficiently or elegantly I can write about my experience during the Art and Film Intensive, so when the following feels disjointed, please feel free to add joints, and kindly bear with me.

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Teen Blog

Working Title

Cheeky Swagger (a.k.a. Dan), TAG Member

Posted: Monday, September 17, 2012

Last week, Audrey wrote a blog post about the Met's Drawing and Painting Experiments teen class. I also participated in a summer teen program at the Met: the Art and Film Intensive, a three-week course taught by staff from the New York Film Academy and the Metropolitan Museum.

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Teen Blog

A Summer Art Getaway

Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Monday, September 10, 2012

Like Evelin, from whom you heard last week, I participated in the Met's Drawing and Painting Experiments program this summer. This is my third year doing the program, and I have found that each year is unique because of the different projects and the student artists who participate.

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Teen Blog

Drawing and Painting Experiments

Evelin, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Last week, Jamilah and Genevieve wrote the final post related to the Spies in the House of Art exhibition and the Teen Advisory Group's photography project. Over the next month, our blog posts will focus on two of the Met's summer teen programs.

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Teen Blog

Art Tailing

Jamilah, TAG Member; and Genevieve, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Like our fellow TAG members, we spent the last meeting of the summer taking photographs of things that inspired us in the Museum. We found ourselves fascinated by how people reacted to works of art in the galleries—looking closer, taking photographs, and talking to each other about how they felt about the art.

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Teen Blog

Connections

Jimmy, TAG Member; Emily R., Former TAG Member; and Audrey, Former TAG Member and High School Intern

Posted: Monday, August 20, 2012

As frequent visitors to the Met, we often create personal connections with the works of art we see in the galleries. In the Teen Advisory Group's recent photo adventure throughout the Museum, we attempted to integrate the works of art into our own reality.

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Teen Blog

Socialize and Meditate

Evelin, TAG Member; and Garrett, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2012

As Kristen and Ethan wrote last week, the Teen Advisory Group spent its last meeting of the summer wandering around the Museum with cameras. As we explored the building, we learned that the Met provides a space in which people can both socialize with others and meditate by themselves. Our photographs show people who discovered really cool spots at the Met to hang out with friends or to spend time on their own.

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Teen Blog

Framed!

Kristen, TAG Member; and Ethan, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Inspired by the photography, film, and video exhibition Spies in the House of Art, we spent our final Teen Advisory Group meeting of the summer roaming around the Met's galleries with cameras in search of subjects for our own artwork.

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Teen Blog

The Monuments of Paris

Emily R., Former TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 30, 2012

There are many types of art—photographs, film, and video—in the exhibition Spies in the House of Art. I found several of the works in this exhibition quite amusing and a little strange. I was particularly interested in The Monuments of Paris by Laura Larson because it looks at first glance like a conventional tourist photograph.

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Teen Blog

A Machine Worth Much More Than a Penny!

Claudia, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 23, 2012

Sculpture has long been my favorite type of art, but there is one sculpture in Spies in the House of Art—a box construction by Joseph Cornell—that particularly captures my imagination.

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Teen Blog

Broken Pieces

Jimmy, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 16, 2012

In my opinion, this artwork is dull compared to the other works in this gallery, and I don't think this piece would be popular among visitors. However, the lack of color gives these twelve felt panels—which depict fragments of a horse statue in a case—a mysterious aura. I wonder what the statue would have looked like in its entirety.

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Teen Blog

The Mysterious Youth

Genevieve, TAG Member; and Alisha, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 9, 2012

The portrait on the left was painted by the American artist Henry Inman in 1833. The work on the right is a photograph of Inman's painting, taken by the artist Tim Davis in 2003.

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Teen Blog

Flash!

Evelin, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, July 2, 2012

The short film Flash in the Metropolitan documents different works of art at the Met in the middle of the night. The filmmakers moved throughout the galleries with a flash strobe and a 16mm film camera on a track. The film is only three minutes and twenty-five seconds long, but it is on a constant loop in the gallery. This is my favorite piece because it's so unique and the film focuses on works of art chosen by the filmmakers.

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Teen Blog

A Stark Contrast

Ethan, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, June 26, 2012

This photograph is titled The Restorers at San Lorenzo Maggiore, Naples and is by Thomas Struth. In this scene, four art restorers stand in a large room that was formerly part of a church. All four are focused intently on the camera, and each stands in a unique pose. The central focus of the photograph is on the restorers, and the rest of the picture is slightly blurry.

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Teen Blog

Not Your Average Tour

Kit, High School Intern

Posted: Monday, June 18, 2012

In Andrea Fraser's performance art piece, a video titled Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk, the artist assumes the character of Jane Castleton, a docent at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The fictional Castleton leads the audience through what starts as an ordinary tour but slowly becomes more and more bizarre as she discusses not works of art but objects such as the museum's water fountains and restrooms. Fraser's script borrows from many eclectic sources, including Good Housekeeping magazine, a 1960s anthology on poverty, and the writings of Immanuel Kant.

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Teen Blog

Getting "Meta" with Spies in the House of Art

Douglas Eklund, Associate Curator, Department of Photographs

Posted: Monday, June 11, 2012

I would like for visitors to the exhibition Spies in the House of Art: Photography, Film, and Video to have a slightly "meta" experience—specifically, to see themselves standing in a museum looking at art about art in museums.

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Teen Blog

Washington's Search for Victory

DeAndre, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, June 4, 2012

I remember hearing about Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware in school when I was younger. Years later, when I joined the Met's Teen Advisory Group at age eighteen, I was able to see it for the first time. If you learn about the American Revolution, you have to come to the Met to see the lifesize George Washington cross the icy waters of the Delaware.

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Teen Blog

A Majestic Undertaking

Garrett, TAG Member

Posted: Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Walk into the American Wing and step back in time to stand before the six-foot-three George Washington in Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware. Leutze's painting captures the spirit of this daring undertaking by George Washington, and illustrates America's capacity to overcome adversity at great odds.

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Teen Blog

A Glorified Crossing

Kristen, TAG Member

Posted: Monday, May 21, 2012

After the Teen Advisory Group's recent meeting in the American Wing galleries, I chose to write my blog post about Washington Crossing the Delaware, painted by Emanuel Leutze. Sitting in front of this painting, I was most struck by its size; it hangs over twelve feet high and twenty feet wide. This monumental painting seems alive, like a snapshot from the actual crossing of the Delaware River in 1776.

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Teen Blog

Unapproachable

Emily R., Former TAG Member

Posted: Monday, May 14, 2012

My art teacher has a poster of Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau) in our classroom, so as soon as I saw the actual painting in the Met's galleries, I immediately recognized it.

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About this Blog

This blog, written by the Metropolitan Museum's Teen Advisory Group (TAG) and occasional guest authors, is a place for teens to talk about art at the Museum and related topics.