Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Wall panel, first quarter of 17th century; Safavid
    Probably from a garden pavilion in Isfahan, Iran
    Composite body, 28 square tiles, painted and glazed in cuerda seca technique over white slip, set on plaster; Panel: 38 x 63 in. (96.5 x 160 cm), tile: 8 7/8 x 8 7/8 in. (22.5 x 22.5 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1903 (03.9a–c)

    Isfahan, the Safavid capital, and Na’in were the two main centers in which buildings were lavishly decorated with tilework. The old tile-making tradition of composing repetitive geometrical or vegetal patterns was kept alive on mosques and madrasas, but an important innovation on secular buildings was a composition of square tiles individually painted as single elements of an outdoor scene with characters set in a garden landscape. These were placed in royal garden pavilions from the time of Shah cAbbas to that of Shah Sulayman (the last example being the Hasht Bihisht of 1669). The Museum owns three of these panels, all purchased in 1903 and reported to come from "a palace and pavilion built by Shah cAbbas on the garden avenue of the Chahar Bagh at Isfahan." The panel here shows a woman and three men (two of them sitting in conversation, one of the two in the act of writing) and a woman in the garden. Such scenes were among the most frequent and fashionable subjects chosen by miniature painters of the Safavid period.

    Related

    Index Terms

    Art Movement/Style

    Material and Technique

    Object

    Subject Matter/Theme


    On view: Gallery 462
    Move Separator Print
    Close
  • Wall panel, first quarter of 17th century; Safavid
    Probably from a garden pavilion in Isfahan, Iran
    Composite body, 28 square tiles, painted and glazed in cuerda seca technique over white slip, set on plaster; Panel: 38 x 63 in. (96.5 x 160 cm), tile: 8 7/8 x 8 7/8 in. (22.5 x 22.5 cm)
    Rogers Fund, 1903 (03.9a-c)

    Move
    Close