Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Passing Off of the Storm, ca. 1872
    John Frederick Kensett (American, 1816–1872)
    Oil on canvas; 11 3/8 x 24 1/2 in. (28.9 x 62.2 cm)
    Gift of Thomas Kensett, 1874 (74.27)

    The panoramic format, spare design, predominant gray tonality, even the barely visible loop of the fish net trailing behind the punt link Kensett's conception here almost unmistakably to his colleague Sanford Gifford's Morning on the Hudson, Haverstraw Bay (Terra Foundation of Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, Chicago), probably exhibited at the Artists' Fund Society in New York in 1866. On the other hand, the ominous-looking weather effect, which the title assures us is "passing off" rather than approaching, may reference the brooding, eerie pre-thunderstorm aerial phenomena captured most vividly in paintings of the Civil War era by Martin Johnson Heade. Neither of the proposed influences subtracts from Kensett's own acute sensitivity to the full range of light, atmospheric, and meteorological conditions he observed first-hand in the few seasons he enjoyed at his summer studio on Contentment Island, just off the Connecticut coast. It was there that this work, Twilight on the Sound, Darien, Connecticut, indeed, all the paintings in his brother Thomas's 1874 gift to the Metropolitan, are believed to have been made.

    Related


    On view: Gallery 761
    Move Separator Print
    Close
  • Passing Off of the Storm, ca. 1872
    John Frederick Kensett (American, 1816–1872)
    Oil on canvas; 11 3/8 x 24 1/2 in. (28.9 x 62.2 cm)
    Gift of Thomas Kensett, 1874 (74.27)


    Move
    Close