Obi with “Whose Sleeves?” (Tagasode) Pattern, Twill-weave silk with supplementary weft patterning and metallic thread, Japan

誰が袖模様丸帯
Obi with “Whose Sleeves?” (Tagasode) Pattern

Period:
Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:
first half of 19th century
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Twill-weave silk with supplementary weft patterning and metallic thread
Dimensions:
13 ft. 7 in. × 25 in. (414 × 63.5 cm)
Classification:
Costumes
Credit Line:
Gift of Ellen Barker, 1934
Accession Number:
34.37.1
Not on view
A masterpiece of complex brocade weaving, this brightly colored obi, or sash, has a repeat pattern of kosode hung from silken cords. It evokes the traditional Tagasode (or "whose sleeves?") screen paintings of the Momoyama period (1568–1615), intended to pique interest in the woman who wore such evocative robes.
Ellen Barker , New York (until 1934; donated to MMA)
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Noh Robes," 1993.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Ukiyo-e Artists' Responses to Romantic Legends of Two Brothers: Narihira and Yukihira," March 27, 2008–June 8, 2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Beautiful Country: Yamato-e in Japanese Art," November 20, 2010–June 5, 2011.