Basin, Attributed to Damián Hernández (Mexican, active 1607–70), Tin-glazed earthenware, Mexican

Basin

Maker:
Attributed to Damián Hernández (Mexican, active 1607–70)
Date:
1660–80
Geography:
Made in Puebla, Mexico
Culture:
Mexican
Medium:
Tin-glazed earthenware
Dimensions:
H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm); Diam. 20 1/4 in. (51.4 cm)
Classification:
Ceramics
Credit Line:
Gift of Mrs. Robert W. de Forest, 1911
Accession Number:
11.87.3
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 749
The shape of this type of basin, called a lebrillo, is rooted in Hispano-Islamic ceramic traditions. In Mexico, the lebrillo was adapted to a variety of uses, both religious and domestic, often distinguishable by the way in which they are decorated. The interior of this basin, glazed in a technique called aborronado, features a woman in contemporary dress surrounded by birds and a dense pattern of dotted foliate decoration. The basin is marked with the initials “he,” which may belong to Damián Hernández, a founding member of the Puebla potter’s guild.
Marking: marked on exterior of side: h e
Albert Pepper, Mexico City; Mrs. Robert W. de Forest, New York, until 1911