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Schedule of Exhibitions

CURRENT
Major Exhibitions

UPCOMING
Major Exhibitions
Exhibitions

CONTINUING
Exhibitions

Galleries

Chronological List of Exhibitions

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: Information provided below is subject to change. To confirm scheduling and dates, call the Communications Department at 212-570-3951. CONTACT NUMBER FOR USE IN TEXT IS 212-535-7710.

SPECIAL NOTE: All exhibitions take place at The Met Fifth Avenue unless otherwise noted.

CURRENT MAJOR EXHIBITIONS


Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed
November 15, 2017–February 4, 2018
Location: The Met Breuer

Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the BedAlthough Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) attained notoriety early in his career for his unnerving depictions of human anxiety, he believed that his artistic breakthrough occurred much later in life, beginning at age 50. One of his last works, Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed (1940–43)—from which the exhibition takes its title—serves as a lens through which his entire career can be reassessed. Just as composers and writers return to leitmotifs throughout their oeuvre, so did Munch. In the presentation, late works will be presented in dialogue with earlier ones to reveal how the artist revisited former themes and motifs through innovative painting techniques. Featuring some 45 paintings produced between the 1880s and 1940s, with 16 self-portraits and several paintings on view in the United States for the first time, the exhibition reconsiders the legacy of this modern master whose later paintings are largely unknown to American audiences.
The exhibition is made possible by Leonard A. Lauder.
It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Munch Museum, Oslo.
Press Preview: Monday, November 13, 10 a.m.–noon
#MetMunch


Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer
November 13, 2017–February 12, 2018

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and DesignerMichelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564), a towering genius in the history of Western art, will be the subject of a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art this fall. During his long life, Michelangelo was celebrated for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il Divino (“the divine one”) by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today. Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist: approximately 150 of his drawings, three of his marble sculptures, his earliest painting, his wood architectural model for a chapel vault, as well as a substantial body of complementary works by other artists for comparison and context. Among the extraordinary international loans are the complete series of masterpiece drawings he created for his friend Tommaso de’Cavalieri and a monumental cartoon for his last fresco in the Vatican Palace. Selected from 54 public and private collections in the United States and Europe, the exhibition will examine Michelangelo’s rich legacy as a supreme draftsman and designer.
The exhibition is made possible by Morgan Stanley.
Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, Dinah Seiver and
Thomas E. Foster, Cathrin M. Stickney and Mark P. Gorenberg, and Ann M. Spruill and
Daniel H. Cantwell.
Press Preview: Monday, November 6, 10 a.m.–noon
#MetMichelangelo


Rodin at The Met
September 16, 2017–January 15, 2018
Rodin at The Met
On the centenary of the death of Auguste Rodin (1840–1917), The Metropolitan Museum of Art will celebrate its historic collection of the artist's work. Nearly 50 marbles, bronzes, plasters, and terracottas by Rodin, representing more than a century of acquisitions and gifts to the Museum, will be displayed in the newly installed and refurbished B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Gallery (gallery 800). The exhibition will feature iconic sculptures such asThe Thinker and The Hand of God, as well as masterpieces such as;The Tempestthat have not been on view in decades. Paintings from The Met collection by some of Rodin's most admired contemporaries, including his friends Claude Monet (1840–1926) and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes (1824–1898), will be presented in dialogue with the sculptures on display. The extraordinary range of The Met's holdings of Rodin's work will also be highlighted in an adjacent gallery (gallery 809) with a selection of drawings, prints, letters, and illustrated books, as well as photographs of the master sculptor and his art. This focused presentation will introduce visitors to the evolution of Rodin's draftsmanship and demonstrate the essential role of drawing in his practice. It will also address Rodin's engagement with photographers, especially Edward Steichen (1879–1973), who served as a key intermediary in bringing Rodin's drawings to New York.
The exhibition is made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.
Press Preview: Friday, September 15, 9–11 a.m.
#RodinatTheMet

Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection
October 4, 2017–January 7, 2018
Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection
This exhibition will trace the development of European drawing from the Renaissance to the early 20th century through works by such celebrated masters such as Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer, Rembrandt, Tiepolo, Ingres, Seurat, and Matisse. Drawn from the Museum’s acclaimed Robert Lehman Collection and featuring approximately 55 drawings, the exhibition will present a dynamic array of styles, techniques, and genres—from compositional studies for mythological and biblical narratives to panoramic landscapes and arresting studies of the human form. The selection will also illustrate the different facets of the artists’ creative processes—from Leonardo’s keen anatomical observation in his Study of a Bear, to Dürer’s awakening artistic self-consciousness in his Self-Portrait study, to Rembrandt’s re-interpretation of Leonardo’s painted masterpiece, The Last Supper. Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection is the first presentation to highlight the full range of Robert Lehman’s vast and distinguished drawings collection—numbering over 700 sheets—and to explore his significant activity as a 20th-century collector.
Press Preview: Monday, October 2, 10 a.m.–noon
#MetMasterDrawings



Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs
October 11, 2017–January 2, 2018
Location: The Met Breuer
Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs
Raghubir Singh (1942–1999) was a pioneer of color street photography who worked and published prolifically from the late 1960s until his death in 1999 at age 56. Born into an aristocratic family in Rajasthan, Singh resided in Hong Kong, Paris, London, and New York—but his lifelong subject was his native India. The retrospective at The Met Breuer will situate Singh’s work at the intersection of Western modernism and traditional South Asian modes of picturing the world. The 85 photographs by Singh will be featured in counterpoint with the work of his contemporaries and examples of Indian court painting styles that inspired him.
The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art with the cooperation of Succession Raghubir Singh.
Press Preview: Tuesday, October 10, 10 a.m.–noon
#RaghubirSingh


Delirious: Art and the Limits of Reason, 1950–1980

September 13, 2017–January 21, 2018
Location: The Met Breuer

Delirious: Art and the Limits of Reason, 1950–1980Delirious times demand delirious art, or so this exhibition proposes. The years between 1950 and 1980 were beset by upheaval around the globe. Some artists responded by incorporating absurdity, disorder, nonsense, disorientation, and repetition into their work. In the process, they destabilize space and perception, give form to extreme mental, emotional, and physical states, and derange otherwise logical structures and techniques. Featuring roughly 100 objects by 62 artists, the exhibition explores the embrace of absurdity, irrationality, and disorientation among artists living in Europe, South America, and the United States.
Press Preview: Tuesday, September 12, 10 a.m.–noon

 

UPCOMING MAJOR EXHIBITIONS






David Hockney
November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018

David HockneyFor nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. The major retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art—the show’s only North American venue—honors the artist in his 80th year through presenting the most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present. Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney, through his art, has examined, probed, and questioned how the perceived world of movement, space, and time can be captured in two dimensions. David Hockney will offer a grand overview of the artist’s achievements across all media, including painting, drawing, photography, and video. From his early experiments with modernist abstraction and mid-career experiments with illusion and realism, to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has consistently explored the nature of perception and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking.
The exhibition is made possible in part by The Jay Pritzker Foundation, and the
Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed Fund.
It is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Press Preview: Monday, November 20, 10 a.m.–noon
#Hockney

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris
January 23 – April 15, 2018
Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On October 22, 1953, Joseph Cornell wrote at the top of a page in his diary: “Juan Gris / Janis / Yesterday.” The annotation refers to the previous day’s outing, when, on one of his frequent trips to the gallery district in midtown Manhattan, Cornell dropped in at the Sidney Janis Gallery on East 57th Street. Among a presentation of approximately 30 works by European modernists there, one alone captivated Cornell—Juan Gris’s celebrated collage The Man at the Café (1914), which is now a promised gift to the Museum as part of the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection.
The work immediately inspired Cornell to begin a new series: some eighteen boxes, two collages and one sandtray (ca. 1953–1966) created in homage to Juan Gris, whom he called a “warm fraternal spirit.” Completed over a period of fifteen years, it is the only series Cornell dedicated to another visual artist, and exceeds in number the other of his signature boxes that he devoted to the personalities he admired from the worlds of cinema, literature, ballet, and opera. The main protagonist of Cornell’s Juan Gris series is a bird – the great white-crested cockatoo—which Cornell cast in various roles to explore Gris’s own use of blacks and shadows in his work. At The Met, the exhibition Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris will unite for the first time nearly a dozen boxes from Cornell’s Gris series together with the Cubist masterpiece, The Man at the Café.
Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris 
inaugurates a series of dossier exhibitions under the auspices of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The exhibition is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.
Press Preview: Monday, January 22, 10 a.m.–noon

 

Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings
January 30–May 13, 2018
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings
This exhibition will establish Thomas Cole as a major artist of the 19th century within a global context. The artist's most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) will be presented for the first time as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career. Consummate works by J.M.W. Turner and John Constable, among others, will reveal Cole's engagement with European art, while masterworks by Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church will demonstrate Cole's extraordinary legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America. 
The exhibition is made possible by White & Case LLP and the Terra Foundation for American Art.
It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London.
Press Preview: Monday, January 29, 10 a.m.–noon

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas
February 28–May 28, 2018
Pendant, 1 B.C.– A.D. 700. Colombia; Tolima. Museo de Oro, Banco de la República, Bogotá.This major international loan exhibition of luxury arts of the Incas, the Aztecs, and their predecessors will trace the development of gold working in the ancient Americas, from around 1000 B.C. to the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century. Featuring more than 300 newly discovered archaeological finds and other masterpieces, drawn from 53 lenders in 12 countries, the exhibition will cast new light on these ancient civilizations and their place within world history. In the ancient Americas, metals were used primarily for ritual and regalia, rather than for tools, weapons, or currency. Golden Kingdoms will reveal the distinctive ways in which ancient Americans used not only metals, but also jade, shell, and feathers—materials often considered more valuable than gold. Focusing on specific places and times, the exhibition will explore how materials were selected and transformed, imbued with meaning, and deployed in the most important rituals of their time. Accompanied by a catalogue.The exhibition is made possible in part by DAVID YURMAN. The exhibition is co-organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute.
Press Preview: Monday, February 26, 10 a.m.–noon
#Golden Kingdoms

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)
April 16–July 29, 2018
The palace of Versailles and its gardens have attracted travelers ever since it was transformed under direction of the Sun King, Louis XIV, from a simple hunting lodge into one of the most magnificent and public courts of Europe. French and foreign travelers, royalty, dignitaries and ambassadors, artists, musicians, writers and philosophers, scientists, grand tourists and day-trippers alike all flocked to the majestic royal palace surrounded by its extensive formal gardens. Versailles was always a truly international setting. Countless visitors described their experiences and observations in correspondence and journals. Court diaries, gazettes, and literary journals offer detailed reports on specific events and entertainments, as well as on ambassadorial receptions that were also documented in paintings and engravings. The exhibition will track these many travelers from 1682 when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles up to 1789 when the royal family was forced to leave the palace and return to Paris. Through paintings and portraits, furniture, tapestries, carpets, costumes and uniforms, porcelain, gold boxes, sculpture, arms and armor, engravings and guidebooks, the exhibition will illustrate what the visitors encountered at court, what kind of welcome and access to the palace they received, and most importantly what they saw, and what impressions, gifts and souvenirs they took home with them.
The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Château de Versailles.
Press Preview: April 9, 2018, 10 a.m.–noon

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici
April 24–July 22, 2018
This is the first major exhibition devoted to the art of New Spain (Mexico) during the 18th century. It offers a fresh perspective on a neglected subject, surveying the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlighting the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. The exhibition includes approximately 120 works art, mainly paintings, many of which are unpublished and newly restored.
The exhibition is co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and
Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Press Preview: Monday, April 23, 10 a.m.–noon

 

 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche
November 21, 2017–January 7, 2018

The Met will continue a long-standing holiday tradition with the presentation of its Christmas tree, a favorite of both New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. The magnificently lit, 20-foot blue spruce looms over a vivid 18th-century Neapolitan Nativity scene, enshrined in an abundant array of lifelike figures with silk-robed angels hovering above. The scene describes in detail the Mediterranean harbor town's multi-cultural society. The installation will be set in front of the 18th-century Spanish choir screen from the Cathedral of Valladolid in the Museum’s Medieval Sculpture Hall. Recorded Christmas music and daily lighting ceremonies will add to the enjoyment of the holiday display.
The exhibit of the crèche is made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund.
#MetChristmasTree

Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs
December 4, 2017–March 18, 2018
A member of the high society “international set” in fin-de-siècle Europe, Baron Adolf de Meyer (1868–1946) was also a pioneering art, portrait, and fashion photographer. This is the first museum exhibition devoted to the artist in more than 20 years. Some 40 works—including early snapshots, society portraits, an exceptional book documenting Nijinsky’s scandalous 1912 ballet L’Après-Midi d’un Faune, early experiments in color processes, and inventive fashion photographs—will demonstrate the breadth of his career.
 
The Face of Dynasty: Royal Crests from Wstern Cameroon
December 4, 2017–September 3, 2018
As avatars of royal power and authority in Western Cameroon, Tsesah crest masks by Bamileke artists stand out for their monumental scale and bold interpretations of the head. In celebration of The Met’s recent acquisition of a rare 18th-century masterpiece, the exhibition presents this Tsesah crest along with three examples drawn from other collections. Only 15 works from this genre survive, and this presentation is the first opportunity in the United States to view a group of these epic creations together.
 
The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery
December 12, 2017–March 11, 2018

This exhibition will be dedicated to the extraordinary set of 12 silver-gilt standing cups known collectively as the Aldobrandini Tazze. The Tazze will be reunited and displayed together for the first time since the mid-19th century, when the objects were disassembled and dispersed, their constituent parts misidentified and mismatched. The exhibition will thus provide visitors with a rare opportunity to appreciate one of the finest and most enigmatic monuments of 16th-century goldsmiths’ work. Properly reassembled, the Tazze bring to life the history of the first 12 Caesars, as recounted by the Roman historian Suetonius. Each stands over a foot high, and is comprised of a shallow footed dish surmounted by the figure of one of the Caesars; four scenes from Suetonius’s Life of the relevant ruler appear intricately wrought upon the concave interior of each dish. The Silver Caesars will highlight the elegance and erudition of the Tazze, presenting them together with a small selection of relevant works in silver as well as in other media, including both ancient and Renaissance coins and medals, and Renaissance prints, books, and paintings. The show will also address the set’s later history by presenting 18th- and 19th-century works that the Tazze inspired. A digital component will enable visitors to explore the Tazze and their fantastic antiquarian imagery in greater depth. In addition to offering new insights into the Tazze and their history, the exhibition will also explore the set’s famously mysterious reputation—engaging the visitor in tracing clues that may lead us towards a better understanding of this Renaissance masterpiece.
The exhibition is madepossible by The Schroder Foundation, Selim Zilkha, the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, and anonymous donors.
 
Crowns of the Vajra Masters: Ritual Art of Nepal
December 16, 2017—December 16, 2018
Ritual is at the heart of the esoteric school of Buddhism practiced in the Himalayas. Central to its enactment in Nepal is the wearing of elaborate crowns—gilt copper and jewel encrusted— by the priests who perform the ritual service. The crowns befit the perfected being (bodhisattva) who the priests impersonate during worship. By wearing the crown, the practitioner is understood to ultimately become a bodhisattva, with full knowledge (wisdom) and (spiritual) authority. The crowns are worn exclusively by the hereditary caste of Vajracharyas, who occupy the highest rank in the Nepalese Buddhist community and serve as the officiating ritual agents of Vajrayana Buddhism as practiced in Nepal. Crowns of the Vajra Masters features five spectacular crowns at its center, configured as a mandala, along with The Met’s unrivaled collection of early Nepalese cloth paintings as well as paraphernalia associated with ritual performance. The crowns, some dating as early as the 13th century, preserve the memory of early Indian Buddhist practices otherwise lost to us.
Curator: John Guy, Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of the Arts of South and Southeast Asia.
The exhibition is supported by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund

A Passion for Jade: Heber Bishop and His Collection
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
Heber Bishop's collection of carved jades was formed in the last quarter of the 19th century and bequeathed to the Metropolitan Museum in 1902. Consisting of over 1,000 pieces—primarily Chinese jades of the 18th and 19th centuries, and jades from Mughal India—it was the first major collection of its kind in the country. This exhibition features a selection of the finest examples from this renowned collection.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#BishopJades

Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
Consisting of 20 textiles and 50 lacquers, this exhibition of Chinese decorative art will explore how real and mythical animals—such as the dragon, unicorn, phoenix, lion, ox, and butterfly—are depicted on luxury materials of late imperial China. Spanning several hundred years—from the 13th to the 19th century—the exhibition will present a wide range of objects: dragon robes, rank badges, and tapestry panels for interior decoration, as well as many different types of lacquer vessels from imperial workshops. All objects are drawn exclusively from The Met collection.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.

Art and Peoples of the Kharga Oasis
October 11, 2017–September 30, 2018
In 1908, The Metropolitan Museum of Art began to excavate late-antique sites in the Kharga Oasis, located in Egypt’s Western Desert. The multiple cultural and religious identities of people who had lived in the region between the third and seventh centuries A.D. will be revealed through the presentation of some 30 works from these excavations.

Portable Storage: Tribal Weavings from the Collection of William and Inger Ginsberg
September 25, 2017–May 7, 2018
Woven bags carried by nomads from Iran, Turkey, and Transcaucasia were designed to contain all of the necessities of life, from bedding to salt. This exhibition of 19 distinctly patterned examples from the collection of William and Inger Ginsberg will lend insight into a way of life practiced in the Middle East for hundreds of years.
The exhibition is made possible by The Hagop Kevorkian Fund.

Streams and Mountains without End: Landscape Traditions of China
August 26, 2017–January 6, 2019
About a thousand years ago, the legendary Chinese landscape painter Guo Xi posed the question, “In what does a gentleman’s love of landscape consist?” The question is at the heart of this exhibition. Showcasing more than 120 Chinese landscape paintings in three rotations, it will explore the many uses of landscape in the Chinese visual arts. The focus is on paintings, but the presentation will also include textiles, ceramics, bamboo carvings, and more.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.

Range: Experiments in New York, 1961-2007
August 18, 2017–February 25, 2018
This installation borrows its title from a series of drawings by Donald Moffett (born San Antonio, 1955) rendered in fudge on paper pierced with a bullet shot by his friend, Robert Beck (born Towson, Maryland, 1959). As a young artist who arrived in New York in the late 1970s, Moffett was inspired by more-established colleagues, including Alice Aycock, Lynda Benglis, and Elizabeth Murray, whose post-Minimalist work resonated with what he calls his "fractured formalist impulses." Taking this intergenerational artistic milieu as its point of departure, this exhibition brings together works by artists whose output subverts a rigorous formalism through references to subjectivity, narrative, and process.

On Country: Australian Aboriginal Art from the Robert Kaplan and Margaret Levi Gift
August 11, 2017–December 17, 2017

Six works of contemporary art by leading Australian Aboriginal artists will be the focus of this exhibition. Monumental in both scale and ambition, the works on view will explore a particular kind of movement in nature—such as one sees in rain and lightning and other occurrences that shine or shimmer—and its relationship to time and the ancestral landscape. The paintings are part of a 2016 gift that introduces an electrifying new dimension into The Met’s representation of global contemporary art.

Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissance
August 7–Summer 2019
Bringing together 62 masterpieces from The Met’s permanent collection of 16th-century northern European art, and one important loan, this exhibition revolves around questions of historical worth, exploring relative value systems in the Renaissance era. Organized in six sections—raw materials, virtuosity, technological advances, fame, market, and paragone—tapestry, stained and vessel glass, sculpture, paintings, precious metal-work and enamels are juxtaposed with pricing data from 16th-century documents. What did a tapestry cost in the 16th century? Goldsmiths’ work? Stained glass? How did variables like raw materials, work hours, levels of expertise and artistry, geography and rarity, affect this? Did production cost necessarily align with perceived market valuation in inventoried collections? Who assigned these values? By exploring different 16th century yardsticks of gauging worth, by probing extrinsic versus intrinsic value, and by presenting works of different media and function side-by-side, the exhibition captures a sense of the splendor and excitement of this era.

World War I and the Visual Arts
July 31, 2017–January 7, 2018

Organized to commemorate the anniversary of World War I, this exhibition will focus on the impact of the war on the visual arts. Moving chronologically from its outbreak to the decade after the armistice, World War I and the Visual Arts will highlight the diverse ways artists represented the horrors of modern warfare. The works on view will reflect a variety of responses, ranging from nationalist enthusiasm to a more somber reflection on the carnage and mass devastation that resulted. The exhibition, drawn mainly from the collection of The Met and supplemented with select loans, will include prints, drawings, photographs, illustrated books, posters, periodicals, World War I trading cards from the Museum’s celebrated Burdick Collection, and other documentary material. World War I and the Visual Arts will reveal how artists—including Otto Dix, C.R.W. Nevinson, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, Fernand Léger, Gino Severini, and Edward Steichen—reflected a myriad of styles, approaches, ideologies, and mediums in response to the war and how it influenced modern art.

Eighteenth-Century Pastel Portraits
July 26–November 5, 2017
Pastel portraiture flourished in 18th-century Europe owing to the medium's distinctive optical properties—its brilliant colors and warm glow. The powdery nature of pastel crayons allowed artists to bathe their sitters in flattering light. The dual nature of the paintings—realistic yet ephemeral—inspired in viewers a sense of wonder. This exhibition will draw from a small but important group of French, Italian, German, and British pastels in the Museum's collection. Examining works by Rosalba Carriera, Charles Antoine Coypel, Adélaïde Labille-Guiard, and other leading portraitists, it will explore the rising popularity of pastel in conjunction with artistic practices and technological advances of the day.

Frederic Remington at The Met
July 3, 2017–January 2, 2018
The artist Frederic Remington (1861–1909)—chronicler par excellence of the American West—has long been celebrated for his achievements as an illustrator, a painter, a sculptor, and a writer. This exhibition will present the artist’s legacy through some 20 paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and illustrated books from the late 1880s until his death. His creative process will be revealed through the juxtaposition of examples from each area of endeavor.
The exhibition is made possible by the William Cullen Bryant Fellows.

Talking Pictures: Camera-Phone Conversations between Artists
June 27, 2017–December 17, 2018
Over the past decade, mobile-phone cameras have changed how photographs are made, used, and looked at. The devices have turned photography into a means of communication that is fluid, instantaneous, and ephemeral, an act that is closer to speaking than to writing. While the camera once functioned chiefly as a tool for preserving the past, today people use mobile phones to share their visual experience in real time and with unprecedented intimacy. The exhibition will highlight this novel aspect of photographic communication by exploring what happens when 12 artists are paired with 12 other artists and invited to engage in a visual dialogue with one another on their phones, sending still images and brief videos back and forth in a game of visual ping-pong. The completed dialogues will be presented in the galleries in various forms.
The exhibition is made possible by Adobe.
#MetTalkingPictures

Cosmic Buddhas in the Himalayas
June 24–December 10, 2017
By presenting the intricate realm of the multifaceted Himalayan pantheon in a startlingly simple way—in a single room—this exhibition will unlock the complex world of Himalayan Buddhism. The presentation will demonstrate the core structure of its belief system using the gallery as a metaphor for the macrocosm. Through 18 exquisite works of sculpture and painting, dating from the 13th through the 19th century, from the area that is now Nepal and Tibet, it will tell the story of five different Buddhas and some of their most significant manifestations as well as the Buddhas’ relationship with the four heavens.
The exhibition is made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund.

The Body Politic: Video from The Met Collection
June 20–September 3, 2017
Location: The Met Breuer
This exhibition presents four videos created between 1995 and 2015. Ranging from the provocative to the poignant to the absurdist, the videos are David Hammons’s Phat Free (1995); Arthur Jafa’s Love Is the Message, the Message Is Death (2016); Steve McQueen’s Five Easy Pieces (1995); and Mika Rottenberg’s NoNoseKnows (2015). The exhibition considers the body in relationship to race, ethnicity, class, and gender. The videos—all from The Met’s collection—explore the connection between power, performance, and moving images. In each, the role of the camera is paramount, as is that of the actors and the activity it records.
#MetBodyPolitic

Talking Pictures: Camera-Phone Conversations between Artists
June 27, 2017–December 17, 2018
Over the past decade, mobile-phone cameras have changed how photographs are made, used, and looked at. The devices have turned photography into a means of communication that is fluid, instantaneous, and ephemeral, an act that is closer to speaking than to writing. While the camera once functioned chiefly as a tool for preserving the past, today people use mobile phones to share their visual experience in real time and with unprecedented intimacy. The exhibition will highlight this novel aspect of photographic communication by exploring what happens when 12 artists are paired with 12 other artists and invited to engage in a visual dialogue with one another on their phones, sending still images and brief videos back and forth in a game of visual ping-pong. The completed dialogues will be presented in the galleries in various forms.
The exhibition is made possible by Adobe.
#MetTalkingPictures

Japanese Bamboo Art: The Abbey Collection
June 13, 2017–February 4, 2018

This exhibition of more than 90 masterworks of Japanese bamboo art will explore the refined beauty and technical sophistication of Japanese bamboo, which has been little known in the West until recent years. The exhibition will open with a monumental contemporary bamboo sculpture—a site-specific installation commissioned by The Met—and highlight key stages in the modern history of Japanese bamboo art. It will introduce the main lineages of bamboo masters and show the emergence of a contemporary bamboo art scene. Drawn from one of the finest collections of Japanese baskets and bamboo sculpture in private hands, it includes works by six artists who are designated as Living National Treasures in Japan. The exhibition is also the focus of the spring 2017Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin.
The exhibition and accompanying Bulletin are made possible by Diane and Arthur Abbey.
#MetBamboo

American Indian Art from the Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection
May 9-October 8, 2017

This exhibition features 38 masterworks from the Thaw Collection of American Indian Art at the Fenimore Art Museum. Showcasing works in various media—sculpture, painting, drawing, basketry, textiles, ceramics, and decorative arts—it attests to the long-standing excellence of the aesthetic traditions of North America’s Native peoples. Spanning the first millennium to the 20th century, it includes a monumental war record vividly painted on animal hide; a nearly life-size Kwakwaka’wakw potlatch figure; and a waterproof Kamleika garment made of seal or other sea-mammal gut. All works are drawn from the more than 870 pieces assembled by philanthropists Eugene and Clare Thaw.
The exhibition is made possible in part by the Friends of the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.
It is organized by the Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, New York, in collaboration with
The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Paradise of Exiles: Early Photography in Italy
March 13–August 13, 2017

Deemed a “Paradise of Exiles” by the British poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, Italy attracted not only 19th-century Romantics, but also many of photography’s earliest practitioners who traveled to the peninsula in order to capture its monuments and distinctive topography. At the same time, Italians adopted daguerreotypes and paper negatives as a means to represent their own cultural patrimony during a period of political upheaval. The exhibition focuses on Italy’s importance as a center of exchange and experimentation during the first three decades of photography’s history—from 1839, the year of its invention, to 1871, the year Italy became a unified nation.

Sara Berman’s Closet
March 6–November 26, 2017

The meticulously organized closet in which Sara Berman (1920–2004)—an immigrant from Belarus—kept her all-white apparel and accessories both contained her life and revealed it. A re-creation of this modest closet, with its neatly arranged stacks of starched and precisely folded clothing, is presented in The Met’s American Wing as a small period room in dialogue with the opulent, recently installed Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room from 1882. Conceived by the artists Maira and Alex Kalman (Berman’s daughter and grandson), the exhibition was originally organized at Mmuseumm, New York.

Late Antique Textiles and Modern Design
November 11, 2016–October 1, 2017

Artists and designers often find inspiration for their work in objects created in the past. Focusing on foliate patterns and roundels found on textiles from the Late Roman, Byzantine, and Early Islamic periods in Egypt, this exhibition considers how similar motifs found their way onto postcards by the Wiener Werkstätte and garments designed by Mariano Fortuny (1871–1949). All works are from The Met collection.

Splendors of Korean Art
October 1, 2016–September 17, 2017

Thirteen masterpieces on loan from the National Museum of Korea are the highlights of this exhibition. They include Silla gold jewelry and pottery, Goryeo Buddhist sculpture and celadon, and Joseon porcelain and paintings—some of which have never before crossed the Pacific Ocean—and are presented together with treasured works from The Met collection in the Arts of Korea Gallery. Organized chronologically from the Late Bronze Age to the 21st century, this year-long presentation explores Korea's rich artistic traditions and conveys the broad framework of its art history.
The exhibition is made possible in part by The Met’s collaboration with the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Korea and the National Museum of Korea.
#MetKoreanArt

The Aesthetic Movement in America
July 13, 2016–December 10, 2017

The Aesthetic movement developed in the wake of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain with the aim of reforming art and industry through design. This influential design crusade championed the marriage of the beautiful and the functional in all media. A cultural phenomenon of its time, the Aesthetic movement promoted beauty as an artistic, social, and moral force, particularly in the domestic realm. The exhibition features nearly two dozen American works—primarily from The Met collection—that represent the movement.

From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th Centuries
June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

This installation sheds light on Chinese opera costumes. Showcasing robes drawn entirely from The Met collection, it examines these luxury textiles from artistic and technical points of view. The first rotation (on view through January 8, 2017) focuses on costumes used in dramas based on historical events; and the second rotation (on view January 14–October 9, 2017) will feature costumes from plays derived from legends and myths. A set of album leaves faithfully depicting theatrical characters wearing such robes is also displayed.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#ChineseOperaCostumes

Cinnabar: The Chinese Art of Carved Lacquer, 14th to 19th Century
June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

An installation featuring 45 magnificent examples of Chinese carved lacquer drawn entirely from The Met collection, this display explores the development of this significant artistic tradition.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#ChineseLacquer

Colors of the Universe: Chinese Hardstone Carvings

June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

Showcasing a selection of 75 exquisite carvings—not only jade, the most esteemed of East Asian gems, but also agate, malachite, turquoise, quartz, amber, coral, and lapis lazuli—this installation presents the lapidary art of China’s Qing dynasty (1644–1911). Drawn entirely from The Met collection, it reveals the extensive variety of hardstones and full palette of vibrant colors favored at the imperial court.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.

Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014

This reinstallation of the first-floor galleries of the Lila and Acheson Wallace Wing for modern and contemporary art is a comprehensive and unprecedented reinterpretation of The Met collection of European and American modern painting, sculpture, photography, drawings and prints, and design. The first-floor galleries have been divided into seven themes that relate to art and life in the first half of the 20th century: Avant-Garde (Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Gallery and The Esther Annenberg Simon Gallery), Direct Expression (Gallery 911), Abstraction (The Marietta Lutze Sackler Gallery and The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Gallery), Bodies (also in The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Gallery), Work and Industry (Gallery 903), The Metropolis (Pierre and Maria-Gaetana Matisse Gallery), and Retreat (The Sharp Gallery and 901).

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #370
June 30, 2014–January 28, 2018

Sol LeWitt’s 1982 piece Wall Drawing #370: Ten Geometric Figures (including right triangle, cross, X, diamond) with three-inch parallel bands of lines in two directions was installed at the Museum over a period of four weeks. The drawing of 10 geometric figures set within squares went on view in its complete state beginning June 30, 2014 and will remain on view through January 1, 2018.
The loan of Wall Drawing #370 is courtesy of The Estate of Sol LeWitt.
The installation is made possible by The Modern Circle.

Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 30, 2021

When Matilda Geddings Gray acquired her first piece of Fabergé for her niece, in 1933, she was already a wealthy and sophisticated collector, and the name of the Russian artist-jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé (1846–1920) was almost unknown in the United States. Since then, Fabergé’s art has become widely known and his exquisite objects are now internationally sought after. On long-term loan to The Met, this selection from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation collection, one of the finest in the world, includes objects created for the Russian Imperial family, such as the Lilies-of-the-Valley Basket—the most important Fabergé creation in the United States—and three Imperial Easter Eggs.

 
Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room
Opened December 15, 2015

This sumptuous Aesthetic-style dressing room (1881–82) was part of George A. Schastey’s larger commission for Arabella Worsham. She then sold her West 54th Street house and its furnishings to John D. Rockefeller, who made few changes. Although little known today, Schastey operated one of the largest and most successful decorating firms of the time. The Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room has found new life at The Met, where it provides fresh insight into the luxurious and artistic interiors found in New York’s wealthiest households in the late 19th century.

The Arts of Nepal and Tibet
Reopened March 13, 2015

These newly reinstalled galleries for Nepalese and Tibetan arts display some 100 sculptures, paintings, and textiles from the 9th to the 19th century, showcasing the 14 masterpieces acquired recently from the Zimmerman Family Collection.
The installation is made possible in part by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund.
#NepalTibetArts
#AsianArt100

Chinese Treasury
Opened May 19, 2014

This gallery, which recreates the type of collecting and display found in 18th-century treasure cabinets (duobaoge), features some of The Met's most precious works of Chinese art including sculptures and vessels of ivory, rhinoceros horn, glass, porcelain, and jade. Touchpads allow viewers to read introductory texts for all of the objects as well as to explore further by grouping the works of art digitally by material and by theme.

The Costume Institute’s Anna Wintour Costume Center
Opened May 8, 2014

The Costume Institute galleries reopened on May 8 as the Anna Wintour Costume Center after a two-year renovation, reconfiguration, and updating. The 4,200-square-foot main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery features a flexible design that lends itself to frequent transformation, as well as a zonal sound system and innovative projection technology. The redesigned space also includes: the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery, which orients visitors to The Costume Institute’s exhibitions and holdings; a state-of-the-art costume conservation laboratory; an expanded study/storage facility that houses the combined holdings of The Met and the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection (which was transferred to The Met in 2009); and The Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library, one of the world’s foremost fashion libraries. The Costume Institute was last refurbished in 1992.

European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800
Opened May 23, 2013

The Met’s galleries for its world-renowned collection of European Old Master paintings from the 13th through the early 19th century reopened in May 2013 after an extensive renovation and reinstallation. This was the first major renovation of the galleries since 1951 and the first major reinstallation of the collection since 1972. Gallery space has increased by almost one-third, making it possible to display more than 700 paintings from the collection and giving the entire floor of galleries a grandeur not seen in half a century. The reinstallation also captures historical crosscurrents between countries and contacts between artists by placing them in adjoining rooms. The Met collection of early Netherlandish, Italian, and French paintings is wide-ranging and includes landmark pictures, while its collection of Dutch school paintings must be counted among the finest in the world. As for individual artists, the representation of Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Poussin, Velázquez, Goya, and David is the strongest in the western hemisphere, and there are individual masterpieces known to every student of art history, such as Bruegel’s The Harvesters and David’s The Death of Socrates. Key works have been cleaned, conserved, or reframed, and important new loans complement the collection.

# # #

Updated September 1, 2017


CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF UPCOMING AND CURRENT EXHIBITIONS
 
CURRENT MAJOR EXHIBITIONS
Ettore Sottsass: Design Radical
July 21–October 8, 2017

Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque
July 25–October 15, 2017

The Roof Garden Commission: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance
April 14–October 29, 2017



UPCOMING MAJOR EXHIBITIONS
 
Delirious: Art and the Limits of Reason, 1950–1980
September 13, 2017–January 21, 2018
 
Rodin at The Met
September 16, 2017–January 15, 2018

Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection
October 4, 2017–January 7, 2018

Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs
October 11, 2017–January 2, 2018

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer
November 13, 2017–February 12, 2018

Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed
November 15, 2017–February 4, 2018

David Hockney
November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas
February 28–May 28, 2018

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)
April 16–July 29, 2018

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici
April 24–July 22, 2018

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS



Portable Storage: Tribal Weavings from the Collection of William and Inger Ginsberg
September 25, 2017–May 7, 2018

Art and Peoples of the Kharga Oasis
October 11, 2017–September 30, 2018

Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018

A Passion for Jade: Heber Bishop and His Collection
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018

Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche
November 21, 2017–January 7, 2018
 
Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs
December 4, 2017–March 18, 2018

The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery
December 12, 2017–March 11, 2018
 

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

Streams and Mountains without End: Landscape Traditions of China
August 26, 2017–January 6, 2018

Gilded Age Drawings at The Met
August 21, 2017–December 10, 2017

Range: Experiments in New York, 1961–2007
August 18, 2017–February 25, 2018

On Country: Australian Aboriginal Art from the Robert Kaplan and Margaret Levi Gift
August 11, 2017–December 17, 2017

Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissance
August 7–Summer 2019

World War I and the Visual Arts
July 31, 2017–January 7, 2018

Eighteenth-Century Pastel Portraits
July 26–October 29, 2017

The Body Politic: Video from The Met Collection
June 20–September 3, 2017

Talking Pictures: Camera-Phone Conversations between Artists
June 27, 2017–December 17, 2018

Japanese Bamboo Art: The Abbey Collection
June 13, 2017–February 4, 2018

American Indian Art from the Fenimore Art Museum: The Thaw Collection
May 9-October 8, 2017

Sara Berman’s Closet
March 6–November 26, 2017

Late Antique Textiles and Modern Design
November 11, 2016–October 1, 2017

Splendors of Korean Art
October 1, 2016–September 17, 2017

The Aesthetic Movement in America
July 13, 2016–December 10, 2017

From the Imperial Theater: Chinese Opera Costumes of the 18th and 19th Centuries
June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

Cinnabar: The Chinese Art of Carved Lacquer, 14th to 19th Century
June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

Colors of the Universe: Chinese Hardstone Carvings
June 25, 2016–October 9, 2017

Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014

Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawing #370
June 30, 2014–January 28, 2018

Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 30, 2021


Image Captions:

The Roof Garden Commission: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Roof Garden Commission: Adrián Villar Rojas, The Theater of Disappearance. Installation view, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2017. Courtesy of the artist; Marian Goodman Gallery; and Kurimanzutto, Mexico City. Photographed by Jörg Baumann

Ettore Sottsass: Design Radical: Ettore Sottsass, "Carlton" Room Divider (detail), 1981. Wood, plastic laminate. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, John C. Waddell Collection, Gift of John C. Waddell, 1997

Cristóbal de Villalpando: Mexican Painter of the Baroque: Cristóbal de Villalpando (ca. 1649–1714). Moses and the Brazen Serpent and the Transfiguration of Jesus (detail), 1683. Oil on Canvas. Col. Propiedad de la Nación Mexicana, Secretaría de Cultura, Dirección General de Sitios y Monumentos del Patrimonio Cultural Acervo de la Catedral de Nuestra Señora de la Inmaculada Concepción, Puebla, Mexico
 
Delirious: Art and the Limits of Reason, 1950–1980: Anna Maria Maiolino,In-Out (Antropofagia) [In-Out (Antropophagy)], from Fotopoemação [Photopoemaction] series, 1973/74.Black and white analog photograph (Photo: Max Nauenberg). Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth © Anna Maria Maiolino

Rodin at The Met: Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840-1917 Meudon), Orpheus and Eurydice, modeled probably before 1887, carved 1893, marble. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910

Leonardo to Matisse: Master Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection: Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (French, Montauban 1780-1867 Paris), Study for "Raphael and the Fornarina"(?), ca. 1814(?), graphite on white wove paper. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Modernism on the Ganges: Raghubir Singh Photographs: Raghubir Singh, Pavement Mirror Shop, Howrah, West Bengal, 1991, Collection of Cynthia Hazen Polsky. Photograph copyright © 2017 Succession Raghubir Singh.

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer: Michelangelo Buonarroti (Italian, Caprese 1475–1564 Rome), Three Labours of Hercules (detail), 1530-33, red chalk. ROYAL COLLECTION TRUST / © HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 2017, www.royalcollection.org.uk

Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed: Edvard Munch, Self-Portrait between the Clock and the Bed (detail), 1940-43. Oil on canvas. Munch Museum, Oslo © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © Munch Museum

David Hockney: David Hockney (British, born Bradford, 1937),A Bigger Splash, 1967. Acrylic on canvas. Tate, purchased 1981. ©David Hockney, Photo Credit: ©Tate, London 2017
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings: Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow(detail), 1836. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908.

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas: Pendant, 1 b.c.– a.d. 700. Colombia; Tolima. Museo de Oro, Banco de la República, Bogotá.

 

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