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Schedule of Exhibitions

UPCOMING
Major Exhibitions
Exhibitions
 

CURRENT
Major Exhibitions


CONTINUING
Exhibitions


EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: Information provided below is subject to change. To confirm scheduling and dates, call the Communications Department at 212-570-3951. CONTACT NUMBER FOR USE IN TEXT IS 212-535-7710.

SPECIAL NOTE: All exhibitions take place at The Met Fifth Avenue unless otherwise noted.


UPCOMING MAJOR EXHIBITIONS

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)
March 21–July 22, 2018
Seven hundred years of sculptural practice—from 14th-century Europe to the global present—will be examined anew in the groundbreaking exhibition Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now). On view at The Met Breuer from March 21 through July 22, 2018, the exhibition will explore expanded narratives of sculpture through works in which artists have sought to replicate the literal, living presence of the human body. A major international loan exhibition of approximately 120 works, Like Life will draw on The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s rich collection of European sculpture and modern and contemporary art, while also featuring a selection of important works from national and international museums and private collections.
The exhibition is supported in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund.
Press Preview: Monday, March 19, 10 a.m.–noon

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)
April 16–July 29, 2018
Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)The palace of Versailles and its gardens have attracted travelers ever since it was transformed under direction of the Sun King, Louis XIV, from a simple hunting lodge into one of the most magnificent and public courts of Europe. French and foreign travelers, royalty, dignitaries and ambassadors, artists, musicians, writers and philosophers, scientists, grand tourists and day-trippers alike all flocked to the majestic royal palace surrounded by its extensive formal gardens. Versailles was always a truly international setting. Countless visitors described their experiences and observations in correspondence and journals. Court diaries, gazettes, and literary journals offer detailed reports on specific events and entertainments, as well as on ambassadorial receptions that were also documented in paintings and engravings. The exhibition will track these many travelers from 1682 when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles up to 1789 when the royal family was forced to leave the palace and return to Paris. Through paintings and portraits, furniture, tapestries, carpets, costumes and uniforms, porcelain, gold boxes, sculpture, arms and armor, engravings and guidebooks, the exhibition will illustrate what the visitors encountered at court, what kind of welcome and access to the palace they received, and most importantly what they saw, and what impressions, gifts and souvenirs they took home with them.
The exhibition is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Château de Versailles.
Press Preview: April 9, 2018, 10 a.m.–noon

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici
April 24–July 22, 2018
Painted in MexicoThis is the first major exhibition devoted to the art of New Spain (Mexico) during the 18th century. It offers a fresh perspective on a neglected subject, surveying the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlighting the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. The exhibition includes approximately 120 works art, mainly paintings, many of which are unpublished and newly restored.
The exhibition is co-organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and
Fomento Cultural Banamex.
Press Preview: Monday, April 23, 10 a.m.–noon

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination
May 10–October 8, 2018
Heavenly Bodies
The Costume Institute's spring 2018 exhibition—at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters—will feature a dialogue between fashion and religious artworks from the The Met collection to examine the relationship between creativity and the religious imagination.
Serving as the cornerstone of the exhibition, papal robes and accessories from the Sistine Chapel sacristy, many of which have never been seen outside The Vatican, will be on view in the Anna Wintour Costume Center. Fashions from the early 20th century to the present will be shown in The Met's Medieval and Byzantine galleries and at The Met Cloisters alongside religious artworks, to provide an interpretative context for fashion's engagement with Catholicism.
#MetHeavenlyBodies


History Refused to Die: Highlights from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation Gift
May 22–September 23, 2018

This exhibition will present 30 paintings, sculptures, drawings, and quilts by self-taught contemporary African American artists to celebrate the 2014 gift to The Metropolitan Museum of Art of works of art from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. The artists represented by this generous donation all hail from the American South, mainly Alabama and Florida.
History Refused to Die will feature the mixed-media art of Thornton Dial (1928–2016)—whose monumental assemblage from 2004 provides the exhibition's title—and a selection of the renowned quilts from Gee's Bend, Alabama, by quilters such as Annie Mae Young (1928–2012), Lucy Mingo (born 1931), Loretta Pettway (born 1942), and additional members of the extended Pettway family. Among other accomplished artists to be featured are Nellie Mae Rowe (1900–1982), Lonnie Holley (born 1950), and Ronald Lockett (1965–1988).
Remarkably diverse in media and technique, the works in this exhibition nonetheless suggest their makers' cultural and aesthetic kinship through the use of found and repurposed materials. Their subjects are likewise varied, rooted in personal history and experience, regional identity—particularly common legacies of slavery and post-Reconstruction histories of oppression under the Black Codes and Jim Crow laws—in addition to national and international events.

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection
July 3–October 7, 2018
ObsessionThis exhibition at The Met Breuer will present a selection of some 50 works from The Met's Scofield Thayer Collection—a collection that is best known for paintings by artists of the school of Paris, and a brilliant group of erotic and evocative watercolors, drawings, and prints by Gustave Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Pablo Picasso, whose subjects, except for a handful, are nudes. The exhibition will be the first time these works have been shown together and will provide a focused look at this important collection; it also marks the centenary of the death of Klimt and Schiele.
An aesthete and scion of a wealthy family, Scofield Thayer (1889–1982) was co-publisher and editor of the literary magazine the Dial from 1919 to 1926. In this avant-garde journal he introduced Americans to the writings of T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, Arthur Schnitzler, Thomas Mann, and Marcel Proust, among others. He frequently accompanied these writers' contributions with reproductions of modern art. Thayer assembled his large collection of some 600 works—mostly works on paper—with staggering speed in London, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna between 1921 and 1923. While he was a patient of Sigmund Freud in Vienna, he acquired a large group of watercolors and drawings by Schiele and Klimt, artists who at that time were unknown in America.
When a selection from his collection was shown at the Montross Gallery in New York in 1924—five years before the Museum of Modern Art opened—it won acclaim. It found no favor, however, in Thayer's native city, Worcester, Massachusetts, that same year when it was shown at the Worcester Art Museum. Incensed, Thayer drew up his will in 1925, leaving his collection to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He withdrew from public life in the late 1920s and lived as a recluse on Martha's Vineyard and in Florida until his death in 1982.
Press Preview: July 2, 2018, 10 a.m.–noon


CURRENT MAJOR EXHIBITIONS

Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings
January 30–May 13, 2018
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings
This exhibition will establish Thomas Cole as a major artist of the 19th century within a global context. The artist's most iconic works, including The Oxbow (1836) and his five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36) will be presented for the first time as a direct outcome of his transatlantic career. Consummate works by J.M.W. Turner and John Constable, among others, will reveal Cole's engagement with European art, while masterworks by Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church will demonstrate Cole's extraordinary legacy in establishing a school of 19th-century landscape art in America. 
The exhibition is made possible by White & Case LLP and the Terra Foundation for American Art.
It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London.
Press Preview: Monday, January 29, 10 a.m.–noon

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris
January 23 – April 15, 2018
Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris

On October 22, 1953, Joseph Cornell wrote at the top of a page in his diary: “Juan Gris / Janis / Yesterday.” The annotation refers to the previous day’s outing, when, on one of his frequent trips to the gallery district in midtown Manhattan, Cornell dropped in at the Sidney Janis Gallery on East 57th Street. Among a presentation of approximately 30 works by European modernists there, one alone captivated Cornell—Juan Gris’s celebrated collage The Man at the Café (1914), which is now a promised gift to the Museum as part of the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection.
The work immediately inspired Cornell to begin a new series: some eighteen boxes, two collages and one sandtray (ca. 1953–1966) created in homage to Juan Gris, whom he called a “warm fraternal spirit.” Completed over a period of fifteen years, it is the only series Cornell dedicated to another visual artist, and exceeds in number the other of his signature boxes that he devoted to the personalities he admired from the worlds of cinema, literature, ballet, and opera. The main protagonist of Cornell’s Juan Gris series is a bird – the great white-crested cockatoo—which Cornell cast in various roles to explore Gris’s own use of blacks and shadows in his work. At The Met, the exhibition Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris will unite for the first time nearly a dozen boxes from Cornell’s Gris series together with the Cubist masterpiece, The Man at the Café.
Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris inaugurates a series of dossier exhibitions under the auspices of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
The exhibition is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.
Press Preview: Monday, January 22, 10 a.m.–noon

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve
February 6–May 27, 2018
The gift of Gigantomachy II (1966) to The Met in 2016 by The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts, with the support of the artists' sons, Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, is the occasion for this selective survey of Leon Golub's work. Born in Chicago, Golub (1922–2004) occupies a singular position in the history of mid- to late 20th-century art. His devotion to the figure, his embrace of expressionism, his fusion of modern and classical sources, and his commitment to social justice distinguish his practice as an artist.
Alongside the monumental, terrifying Gigantomachy IILeon Golub: Raw Nerve features paintings from all of the artist's most important series, including Pylon, White Squad, Riot, and Horsing Around. These are accompanied by a suite of early paintings that reflect Golub's study of antiquity, a group of unsettling portraits of the Brazilian dictator Ernesto Geisel, and works on paper that represent subjects of longstanding interest to the artist, from mercenaries, interrogators, and the victims of violence to political figures, nudes, and animals, all of them rendered in the raw, visceral style for which he is justly celebrated. Together, these objects attest to Golub's incisive perspective on the catastrophes than afflict human civilization and his critique of brutality and belligerent masculinity. The artist's work has much to teach us in the 21st century, as does his belief in the artist's ethical responsibility.


Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas
February 28–May 28, 2018
Pendant, 1 B.C.– A.D. 700. Colombia; Tolima. Museo de Oro, Banco de la República, Bogotá.This major international loan exhibition of luxury arts of the Incas, the Aztecs, and their predecessors will trace the development of gold working in the ancient Americas, from around 1000 B.C. to the arrival of Europeans in the 16th century. Featuring more than 300 newly discovered archaeological finds and other masterpieces, drawn from 53 lenders in 12 countries, the exhibition will cast new light on these ancient civilizations and their place within world history. In the ancient Americas, metals were used primarily for ritual and regalia, rather than for tools, weapons, or currency. Golden Kingdoms will reveal the distinctive ways in which ancient Americans used not only metals, but also jade, shell, and feathers—materials often considered more valuable than gold. Focusing on specific places and times, the exhibition will explore how materials were selected and transformed, imbued with meaning, and deployed in the most important rituals of their time. Accompanied by a catalogue.The exhibition is made possible in part by DAVID YURMAN. The exhibition is co-organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute.
Press Preview: Monday, February 26, 10 a.m.–noon
#Golden Kingdoms


Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence
March 12–July 29, 2018

Public Parks Private Gardens: Paris to ProvenceDrawing largely on the encyclopedic holdings of The Met, this exhibition will illustrate the horticultural boom that reshaped much of the French landscape during the 19th century. As shiploads of exotic botanical specimens arrived from abroad and local nurserymen pursued hybridization, the availability and variety of plants and flowers grew exponentially, as did the interest in them. The opening up of formerly royal properties and the transformation of Paris during the Second Empire into a city of tree-lined boulevards and parks introduced public green spaces to be enjoyed as open-air salons, while suburbanites and country-house dwellers were inspired to cultivate their own flower gardens. By 1860, the French journalist Eugène Chapus could write: "One of the pronounced characteristics of our Parisian society is that . . . everyone in the middle class wants to have his little house with trees, roses, and dahlias, his big or little garden, his rural piece of the good life."
The important role played by parks and gardens in contemporary French life is richly documented in works in The Met collection by artists extending from Corot to Matisse, many of whom were gardeners themselves. The popularity of botanical and floral motifs at this time is evidenced throughout the pictorial and decorative arts. From paintings by the Impressionists to photographs of the era and vases made to display lush bouquets, this presentation of some 150 works will provide a fresh, multisided perspective on best-known and hidden treasures housed in a Museum that took root in a park: namely, New York's Central Park, which was designed in the spirit of Parisian public parks of the period.
Press Preview: Monday, March 5, 10 a.m.–noon
#ParksandGardens


UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Ranjani Shettar: Seven ponds and a few raindrops
March 12–August 12, 2018
Indian sculptor Ranjani Shettar’s immersive installation Seven ponds and a few raindrops (2017), a recent gift to The Met from the Tia Collection, will be on view in Gallery 916 at The Met Fifth Avenue from March 12 through August 12, 2018. 
Suspended from the ceiling, Seven ponds and a few raindrops is composed of stainless steel elements that have been molded into a series of sensual, curved, amoeba-like forms covered in tamarind-stained muslin—a technique derived from a craft tradition Shettar observed in the small village of Kinnala, India. The shadows cast by the suspended elements give the viewer a sense of having stumbled upon a hidden-away oasis. 

Chippendale’s Director: The Designs and Legacy of a Furniture Maker
May 14, 2018–January 9, 2019
Thomas Chippendale (1718–1779) has been a household name in the furniture world since the mid-18th century. He is remembered today for the furniture produced by his successful London workshop as well as his influential book of furniture designs, The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director. To celebrate the 300th anniversary of Chippendale’s birth, this will look closely at how the unprecedented publication cemented Chippendale’s name as England’s most famous cabinetmaker and also endured to inspire furniture design up to the present day. Built around works in The Met collection, the exhibition will combine the original preparatory drawings from the Chippendale workshop with a selection of British and American furniture inspired by Chippendale’s designs and aesthetic.

 

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

 

Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art
February 7–May 20, 2018

The Diamond Mountains—perhaps the most famous and emotionally resonant site on the Korean peninsula—is the theme of this international loan exhibition. Though the region has inspired cultural pride since ancient times, its location in what is today North Korea has kept it largely inaccessible in modern times. Featuring nearly 30 works—from delicately painted scrolls and screens to monumental modern and contemporary art—the exhibition will present the visual imagery of this iconic site from the 18th century to the present. Among the highlights is a designated Treasure from the National Museum of Korea: an album by Jeong Seon (1676–1759), who revolutionized Korean painting. Most of the objects on view have never before been displayed in the United States.
The exhibition is part of a celebration marking the 20th anniversary of the establishment of The Met's Arts of Korea Gallery. The exhibition's opening month also coincides with South Korea's hosting of the Winter Olympics Games in Pyeongchang.

William Eggleston: Los Alamos
February 14–May 28, 2018

The American photographer William Eggleston (born 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, 50 years later, he is arguably its greatest exemplar. This exhibition will feature a landmark gift to The Met by Jade Lau of the artist's most notable portfolio, Los Alamos. Comprising 75 dye transfer prints from color negatives made between 1965 and 1974, the series has never been shown in its entirety in New York City and includes the artist's first color photograph (Untitled, Memphis, 1965) of a young clerk pushing a train of shopping carts at a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee.  

Painting blossomed in Japan during the Edo period (1615–1868), as artists daringly experimented with conventional styles. In this exhibition, more than 40 examples of Edo-period paintings from the collection of Estelle P. Bender and her late husband T. Richard Fishbein—mostly gifts and promised gifts to The Met—will help trace the development of the major schools and movements of this fascinating era. Contemporary Japanese ceramics will be juxtaposed with Edo-period paintings, while works in various formats and media from The Met collection will provide context. The celebration of the natural world will serve as a unifying theme, and the intertwined relationship between poetry and the pictorial arts—so fundamental to Japanese tradition—will be a particular focus of the exhibition. 
The exhibition and catalogue are made possible by the Bender-Fishbein-Goodman Family.
Press Preview: Monday, February 26, 10 am–noon
 
Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism
January 17–July 15, 2018
This exhibition will survey Conceptual art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. It is occasioned by the artist William Wegman's extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in this medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown, accompanied by photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California such as John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.
Wegman took up video while studying painting at the University of Wisconsin. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video, like photography, for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities—and unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.
It wasn't until he moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he only lived in Los Angeles for three years, Wegman found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed, puns and homonyms are pursued to absurd conclusions. The artist's key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his pet Weimaraner Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom for humorous improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that chime with work by fellow West Coast Conceptualist friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.
 
Crowns of the Vajra Masters: Ritual Art of Nepal
December 16, 2017—December 16, 2018
Ritual is at the heart of the esoteric school of Buddhism practiced in the Himalayas. Central to its enactment in Nepal is the wearing of elaborate crowns—gilt copper and jewel encrusted— by the priests who perform the ritual service. The crowns befit the perfected being (bodhisattva) who the priests impersonate during worship. By wearing the crown, the practitioner is understood to ultimately become a bodhisattva, with full knowledge (wisdom) and (spiritual) authority. The crowns are worn exclusively by the hereditary caste of Vajracharyas, who occupy the highest rank in the Nepalese Buddhist community and serve as the officiating ritual agents of Vajrayana Buddhism as practiced in Nepal. Crowns of the Vajra Masters features five spectacular crowns at its center, configured as a mandala, along with The Met’s unrivaled collection of early Nepalese cloth paintings as well as paraphernalia associated with ritual performance. The crowns, some dating as early as the 13th century, preserve the memory of early Indian Buddhist practices otherwise lost to us.
Curator: John Guy, Florence and Herbert Irving Curator of the Arts of South and Southeast Asia.
The exhibition is supported by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund
 
Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer
December 13, 2017–April 8, 2018
Throughout his nearly 50-year career, the German artist Anselm Kiefer (born 1945) has never been afraid to wrestle with the past. In 1969, toward the end of his studies at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Karlsruhe, he photographed himself in his father's Wehrmacht uniform, posing before historic monuments and Romantic seascapes in Europe with his arm extended in an illegal Nazi salute. Six years later, the artist selected 18 of these images for a photo-essay titled "Occupations," which met with widespread public outcry. Indeed, while Kiefer's artistic provocation ran counter to the intense process of postwar denazification, which included the destruction of offensive monuments and other symbols of Germany's infamous history, it was also a threat to a kind of collective amnesia that had overtaken West Germany in the 1960s and 1970s.
In his continuing effort to disinter the past, in the 1980s Kiefer began to reuse old photographs for new projects and also extend his artistic means. He added new materials, such as earth, lead, and hay, and approached his works in near-alchemical ways. He also turned to monumental themes (including architecture, cosmology, and mysticism) to further ponder time and existence. While his ambition still grows in scale—today, his projects take over his nearly 400,000-square-foot studio outside Paris—his art, particularly in its worked and layered surfaces weathered by time and nature, remains a visceral and poetic consideration of the past as a means to understand our collective present and, by implication, our future. The works presented here, drawn from The Met collection, also offer us an opportunity to reflect on our own nation and the conflicted history we struggle to readdress today. 

The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery
December 12, 2017–March 11, 2018

This exhibition will be dedicated to the extraordinary set of 12 silver-gilt standing cups known collectively as the Aldobrandini Tazze. The Tazze will be reunited and displayed together for the first time since the mid-19th century, when the objects were disassembled and dispersed, their constituent parts misidentified and mismatched. The exhibition will thus provide visitors with a rare opportunity to appreciate one of the finest and most enigmatic monuments of 16th-century goldsmiths’ work. Properly reassembled, the Tazze bring to life the history of the first 12 Caesars, as recounted by the Roman historian Suetonius. Each stands over a foot high, and is comprised of a shallow footed dish surmounted by the figure of one of the Caesars; four scenes from Suetonius’s Life of the relevant ruler appear intricately wrought upon the concave interior of each dish. The Silver Caesars will highlight the elegance and erudition of the Tazze, presenting them together with a small selection of relevant works in silver as well as in other media, including both ancient and Renaissance coins and medals, and Renaissance prints, books, and paintings. The show will also address the set’s later history by presenting 18th- and 19th-century works that the Tazze inspired. A digital component will enable visitors to explore the Tazze and their fantastic antiquarian imagery in greater depth. In addition to offering new insights into the Tazze and their history, the exhibition will also explore the set’s famously mysterious reputation—engaging the visitor in tracing clues that may lead us towards a better understanding of this Renaissance masterpiece.
The exhibition is madepossible by The Schroder Foundation, Selim Zilkha, the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, and anonymous donors.
 
December 4, 2017–April 8, 2018
A member of the high society “international set” in fin-de-siècle Europe, Baron Adolf de Meyer (1868–1946) was also a pioneering art, portrait, and fashion photographer. This is the first museum exhibition devoted to the artist in more than 20 years. Some 40 works—including early snapshots, society portraits, an exceptional book documenting Nijinsky’s scandalous 1912 ballet L’Après-Midi d’un Faune, early experiments in color processes, and inventive fashion photographs—will demonstrate the breadth of his career.
 
December 4, 2017–September 3, 2018
As avatars of royal power and authority in Western Cameroon, Tsesah crest masks by Bamileke artists stand out for their monumental scale and bold interpretations of the head. In celebration of The Met’s recent acquisition of a rare 18th-century masterpiece, the exhibition presents this Tsesah crest along with three examples drawn from other collections. Only 15 works from this genre survive, and this presentation is the first opportunity in the United States to view a group of these epic creations together.
 
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
Heber Bishop's collection of carved jades was formed in the last quarter of the 19th century and bequeathed to the Metropolitan Museum in 1902. Consisting of over 1,000 pieces—primarily Chinese jades of the 18th and 19th centuries, and jades from Mughal India—it was the first major collection of its kind in the country. This exhibition features a selection of the finest examples from this renowned collection.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
#BishopJades
 
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
Consisting of 20 textiles and 50 lacquers, this exhibition of Chinese decorative art will explore how real and mythical animals—such as the dragon, unicorn, phoenix, lion, ox, and butterfly—are depicted on luxury materials of late imperial China. Spanning several hundred years—from the 13th to the 19th century—the exhibition will present a wide range of objects: dragon robes, rank badges, and tapestry panels for interior decoration, as well as many different types of lacquer vessels from imperial workshops. All objects are drawn exclusively from The Met collection.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
 
Art and Peoples of the Kharga Oasis
October 11, 2017–September 30, 2018
In 1908, The Metropolitan Museum of Art began to excavate late-antique sites in the Kharga Oasis, located in Egypt’s Western Desert. The multiple cultural and religious identities of people who had lived in the region between the third and seventh centuries A.D. will be revealed through the presentation of some 30 works from these excavations.

Portable Storage: Tribal Weavings from the Collection of William and Inger Ginsberg
September 25, 2017–May 7, 2018
Woven bags carried by nomads from Iran, Turkey, and Transcaucasia were designed to contain all of the necessities of life, from bedding to salt. This exhibition of 19 distinctly patterned examples from the collection of William and Inger Ginsberg will lend insight into a way of life practiced in the Middle East for hundreds of years.
The exhibition is made possible by The Hagop Kevorkian Fund.
 
August 26, 2017–January 6, 2019
About a thousand years ago, the legendary Chinese landscape painter Guo Xi posed the question, “In what does a gentleman’s love of landscape consist?” The question is at the heart of this exhibition. Showcasing more than 120 Chinese landscape paintings in three rotations, it will explore the many uses of landscape in the Chinese visual arts. The focus is on paintings, but the presentation will also include textiles, ceramics, bamboo carvings, and more.
The exhibition is made possible by the Joseph Hotung Fund.
 

Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissance
August 7–June 23, 2019
Bringing together 62 masterpieces from The Met’s permanent collection of 16th-century northern European art, and one important loan, this exhibition revolves around questions of historical worth, exploring relative value systems in the Renaissance era. Organized in six sections—raw materials, virtuosity, technological advances, fame, market, and paragone—tapestry, stained and vessel glass, sculpture, paintings, precious metal-work and enamels are juxtaposed with pricing data from 16th-century documents. What did a tapestry cost in the 16th century? Goldsmiths’ work? Stained glass? How did variables like raw materials, work hours, levels of expertise and artistry, geography and rarity, affect this? Did production cost necessarily align with perceived market valuation in inventoried collections? Who assigned these values? By exploring different 16th century yardsticks of gauging worth, by probing extrinsic versus intrinsic value, and by presenting works of different media and function side-by-side, the exhibition captures a sense of the splendor and excitement of this era.

Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014
This reinstallation of the first-floor galleries of the Lila and Acheson Wallace Wing for modern and contemporary art is a comprehensive and unprecedented reinterpretation of The Met collection of European and American modern painting, sculpture, photography, drawings and prints, and design. The first-floor galleries have been divided into seven themes that relate to art and life in the first half of the 20th century: Avant-Garde (Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Gallery and The Esther Annenberg Simon Gallery), Direct Expression (Gallery 911), Abstraction (The Marietta Lutze Sackler Gallery and The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Gallery), Bodies (also in The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Gallery), Work and Industry (Gallery 903), The Metropolis (Pierre and Maria-Gaetana Matisse Gallery), and Retreat (The Sharp Gallery and 901).


Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 30, 2021

When Matilda Geddings Gray acquired her first piece of Fabergé for her niece, in 1933, she was already a wealthy and sophisticated collector, and the name of the Russian artist-jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé (1846–1920) was almost unknown in the United States. Since then, Fabergé’s art has become widely known and his exquisite objects are now internationally sought after. On long-term loan to The Met, this selection from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation collection, one of the finest in the world, includes objects created for the Russian Imperial family, such as the Lilies-of-the-Valley Basket—the most important Fabergé creation in the United States—and three Imperial Easter Eggs.

 
GALLERIES
 

Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room
Opened December 15, 2015

This sumptuous Aesthetic-style dressing room (1881–82) was part of George A. Schastey’s larger commission for Arabella Worsham. She then sold her West 54th Street house and its furnishings to John D. Rockefeller, who made few changes. Although little known today, Schastey operated one of the largest and most successful decorating firms of the time. The Worsham-Rockefeller Dressing Room has found new life at The Met, where it provides fresh insight into the luxurious and artistic interiors found in New York’s wealthiest households in the late 19th century.

The Arts of Nepal and Tibet
Reopened March 13, 2015

These newly reinstalled galleries for Nepalese and Tibetan arts display some 100 sculptures, paintings, and textiles from the 9th to the 19th century, showcasing the 14 masterpieces acquired recently from the Zimmerman Family Collection.
The installation is made possible in part by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund.
#NepalTibetArts
#AsianArt100 

Chinese Treasury
Opened May 19, 2014

This gallery, which recreates the type of collecting and display found in 18th-century treasure cabinets (duobaoge), features some of The Met's most precious works of Chinese art including sculptures and vessels of ivory, rhinoceros horn, glass, porcelain, and jade. Touchpads allow viewers to read introductory texts for all of the objects as well as to explore further by grouping the works of art digitally by material and by theme.

The Costume Institute’s Anna Wintour Costume Center
Opened May 8, 2014

The Costume Institute galleries reopened on May 8 as the Anna Wintour Costume Center after a two-year renovation, reconfiguration, and updating. The 4,200-square-foot main Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery features a flexible design that lends itself to frequent transformation, as well as a zonal sound system and innovative projection technology. The redesigned space also includes: the Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery, which orients visitors to The Costume Institute’s exhibitions and holdings; a state-of-the-art costume conservation laboratory; an expanded study/storage facility that houses the combined holdings of The Met and the Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection (which was transferred to The Met in 2009); and The Irene Lewisohn Costume Reference Library, one of the world’s foremost fashion libraries. The Costume Institute was last refurbished in 1992.

European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800
Opened May 23, 2013

The Met’s galleries for its world-renowned collection of European Old Master paintings from the 13th through the early 19th century reopened in May 2013 after an extensive renovation and reinstallation. This was the first major renovation of the galleries since 1951 and the first major reinstallation of the collection since 1972. Gallery space has increased by almost one-third, making it possible to display more than 700 paintings from the collection and giving the entire floor of galleries a grandeur not seen in half a century. The reinstallation also captures historical crosscurrents between countries and contacts between artists by placing them in adjoining rooms. The Met collection of early Netherlandish, Italian, and French paintings is wide-ranging and includes landmark pictures, while its collection of Dutch school paintings must be counted among the finest in the world. As for individual artists, the representation of Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Poussin, Velázquez, Goya, and David is the strongest in the western hemisphere, and there are individual masterpieces known to every student of art history, such as Bruegel’s The Harvesters and David’s The Death of Socrates. Key works have been cleaned, conserved, or reframed, and important new loans complement the collection.

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Updated March 9, 2018


 

 
UPCOMING MAJOR EXHIBITIONS


Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300
–Now)

March 21–July 22, 2018

Visitors to Versailles (1682
–1789)

April 16–July 29, 2018

Painted in Mexico 1700
–1790: Pinxit Mexici

April 24–July 22, 2018

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination
May 10–October 8, 2018

History Refused to Die: Highlights from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation Gift
May 22–September 23, 2018

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection
July 3–October 7, 2018
 


CURRENT MAJOR EXHIBITIONS

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve
February 6–May 27, 2018

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas
February 28–May 28, 2018
 
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings
January 30–May 13, 2018
 
Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris
January 23–April 15, 2018
 
Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence
March 12–July 29, 2018
 
 
UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS


Ranjani Shettar: Seven ponds and a few raindrops
March 12–August 12, 2018

Chippendale’s Director: The Designs and Legacy of a Furniture Maker
May 14, 2018–January 9, 2019

 

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

Diamond Mountains: Travel and Nostalgia in Korean Art
February 7–May 20, 2018
 
William Eggleston: Los Alamos
February 14–May 28, 2018

The Poetry of Nature: Edo Paintings from the Fishbein-Bender Collection
February 27–January 21, 2018
Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism

January 17–July 15, 2018
 
Crowns of the Vajra Masters: Ritual Art of Nepal
December 16, 2017–December 16, 2018
 
Provocations: Anselm Kiefer at The Met Breuer
December 13, 2017–April 8, 2018
 
The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery
December 12, 2017–March 11, 2018 

Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs
December 4, 2017–March 18, 2018
 
A Passion for Jade: Heber Bishop and His Collection
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
 
Spirited Creatures: Animal Representations in Chinese Silk and Lacquer
October 21, 2017–July 22, 2018
 
Art and Peoples of the Kharga Oasis
October 11, 2017–September 30, 2018
 
Portable Storage: Tribal Weavings from the Collection of William and Inger Ginsberg
September 25, 2017–May 7, 2018
 
Streams and Mountains without End: Landscape Traditions of China
August 26, 2017–January 6, 2018
 
Relative Values: The Cost of Art in the Northern Renaissance
August 7–Summer 2019
 
Reimagining Modernism: 1900–1950
Opened September 2014
 
Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection
November 22, 2011–November 30, 2021


Image Captions:

 Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now): Greer Lankton (American, 1958-1996). Rachel (detail), 1986. Papier-mâché, metal plates, wire, acrylic paint, and matte medium. 28 × 21 × 11 in. (71.1 × 53.3 × 27.9 cm). Collection Eric Ceputis and David W. Williams, promised gift to the Art Institute of Chicago.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell's Homage to Juan Gris: Joseph Cornell (American, 1903-1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953-54. Box construction. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased: John D. McIlhenny Fund. Art © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY
 
Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence: Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926). The Parc Monceau (detail), 1878. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ittleson Jr. Purchase Fund, 1959 (59.142)

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve: Leon Golub (American, 1922-2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966. Acrylic on linen, 9 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 24 ft. 10 1/2 in. (303.5 x 758.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, 2016 (2016.696). © The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789):Charles-Gabriel Sauvage, called Lemire pere (1741-1827). Figure of Louis XVI and Benjamin Franklin, 1780-85. Porcelain, 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 6 in. (32.4 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of William H. Huntington, 1883 (83.2.260)

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici: Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexican, 1713-1772). Portrait of Doña Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas (detail), c. 1762. Galería Coloniart, Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City. Photo © Rafael Doniz

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination: El Greco, Cardinal Fernando Niño de Guevara (1541-1609), ca. 1600, oil on canvas; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.5); Image © Metropolitan Museum of Art

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination: Evening Coat, Cristobal Balenciaga for House of Balenciaga, autumn/winter 1954-55; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Bryon C. Foy, 1957 (C.I.57.29.8); Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Digital Composite Scan by Katerina Jebb

History Refused to Die: Highlights from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation Gift: Thornton Dial (American, 1928-2016). History Refused to Die (detail), 2004. Okra stalks and roots, clothing, collaged drawings, tin, wire, steel, Masonite, steel chain, enamel, spray paint, 8 ft. 6 in. x 87 in. x 23 in. (259.1 x 221 x 58.4 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection, 2014 (2014.548.1). © Thornton Dial

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection: Egon Schiele (Austrian, 1890-1918). Standing Nude with Orange Drapery, 1914. Watercolor, gouache, and graphite on paper, 18 1/4 x 12 in. (46.4 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982 (1984.433.315ab)
 
Thomas Cole's Journey: Atlantic Crossings: Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow (detail), 1836. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908.

Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas: Pendant, 1 b.c.– a.d. 700. Colombia; Tolima. Museo de Oro, Banco de la República, Bogotá.

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